The Instigator
andreaneeds
Con (against)
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The Contender
TheSatiricalAnarchist
Pro (for)
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Should the U.S be responsible for oversea sweatshops conditions'?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 11/19/2015 Category: Politics
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 405 times Debate No: 82828
Debate Rounds (3)
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andreaneeds

Con

The U.S should not take responsibility for oversea sweatshops. The U.S pays for goods to be made and they are not responsible for what goes during the making of these goods. Major countries we buy from, for instance, China or India should take the responsibility over their workers; we simply pay for the result of their "poor conditions."
TheSatiricalAnarchist

Pro

I accept this debate. Thank you for the opportunity, Con. I wish you the best of luck.

[1] The United States imports millions of items made in other countries through the industry of sweatshops, factories known to violate at least two laws of labour. China is a major exporter to the United States, and many of its goods are produced through sweatshops. America is showing that it condones these conditions by accepting goods from it. If America is truly about morality and democracy, it should be rejecting the goods produced in the labour of children and adults kept to some of the poorest conditions every conceived, which are also essentially slave labour. http://www.veganpeace.com...

[2] There are many rationales involved in this debate, but I personally believe the following cited source really hits them home. http://www.businessweek.com...



Debate Round No. 1
andreaneeds

Con

The U.S doesn't condone these conditions; China and India do. They are aware that their workers in harm, the U.S obviously acknowledges that factories/sweatshops aren't the best conditions, but not all are like that. Less than 2% of sweatshops are safe but the U.S doesn't know which ones are.

For example, if your house was made in India and it starts to fall apart, you're going to complain to how it was constructed and who you hired, not the people who manufactured it in India, are you?

China has completely different laws than the U.S does, the U.S signs a contract and they cannot do anything in their power logically to change Chinese laws - they simply want their goods made. The U.S is not in charge for how their products are made just the end result. Chinese government are aware of these overcrowding sweatshops, it's THEIR fault and decision to change it. China is the 3rd main export market in the U.S - our economy will go bankrupt without it.

https://ustr.gov...
TheSatiricalAnarchist

Pro

Con is contending that the American consumption of the items conceived in these sweatshop, poor conditions does not directly imply that America is therefore supporting the treatment of the workers in these ways. If America opposed these conditions, they would not be imporing items made in them. It's like saying I don't support the family that controls Walmart because I don't appreciate how badly they treat their workers, but yet I shop there all the time and become a source of their profit that keeps them alive.

Yes, China has completely different laws - my argument is not that America should be trying to change the laws of the Chinese Government. What I am instead contending is that if America is getting its imports from China, they should be signing a contract with the provisions that the workers who are making the imports are not to be placed in sweatshops for sweatshop wages and working sweatshop hours. Any consumerism out of that becomes a source of income that keeps these sweatshops alive, and that's why America's consumption of the products condones the acts.
Debate Round No. 2
andreaneeds

Con

The thing is that these sweatshops/factories are owned by the Chinese. The business contracts are formally approved by the Chinese. Honestly, money talks everywhere. China is one of the top 8 richest countries because of that. It's hard to buy something without it being made in China. Most of our items even dating back to the Industrial Revolution were mass produced by labor through children. Even so, your argument is not that America should change the laws - but Chinese companies are in it for their money. I'm pretty sure if the U.S presented a contract saying to establish better conditions, they would either drop out or it would cost them millions to repair and have safe factories/sweatshops all round China/India.

http://www.aflcio.org...

"(for example, the 2008 Employee Contract Law), and created a policy favoring widespread "collective consultation" over wages and working conditions." They have already made a law protecting their workers and if the companies do not follow-up, the U.S cannot oblige to change that. If they are breaking a law, the U.S has no way of knowing it unless they themselves are working there.

After all, the Chinese live there - they are in charge and head of the factories/sweatshops and they accept it. We are simply consumers of products that we signed for - never agreeing to be involved in how people are treated. America does not condone it, in the U.S we have insurance and policies for workers of all kind; we have no say what happens in a completely other country. If we stopped buying from them, we would experience a drop in our economy drastically.

This article proves how not every sweatshop or factory has labor problems:
http://www.theatlantic.com...
TheSatiricalAnarchist

Pro

TheSatiricalAnarchist forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
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