The Instigator
Victoria.Pham
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
finn.b14
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points

Should the children under 16 have much homework?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 4/16/2016 Category: Education
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 392 times Debate No: 89761
Debate Rounds (5)
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Votes (0)

 

Victoria.Pham

Con

I don't agree. the children should have time to develop skills.
finn.b14

Pro

The negative has stated that children under the age of 16 should not have much homework. They have not set up a scope or definition for the phrase "much homework" and so as the affirmative speaker I will create one.

Children under the age of 16 (below ninth grade) should not have 'much homework': extensive schoolwork that a pupil is required to do at home. I firmly believe that that the statement above is true- students should have 'much homework'.

The negative's first point was that students need to have time to develop skills. They obviously believe that students will not develop skills from doing homework. This is incorrect. As my case continues, a myriad of skills developed from homework will clearly become apparent.

Schools have a purpose to teach kids skills that they need for later life. The school day lasts for only 6 hours and whilst this is enough time to introduce all skills, it is not enough to reiterate, and ensure that a deep understanding of the involved exists. This is why homework is essential for school children.

Whilst the negative has built up a safety barrier by writing the topic as 'under 16 year olds', this statement in practice offers no safety as all skills required for the entrance to these imperative senior years are developed before the child is sixteen.

An example of this lies in the subject of mathematics. If a Year 8 student tried to tackle algebra in class but failed, the teacher would not set the child homework as it was against the negative's policies. The student will forget the work in class and would have to relearn the matter again in the next resulting in a cumulative lag in the child's knowledge of algebra and mathematics. Whilst this may not be as bigger of an issue in pre-senior years, by the time the child is entering advanced algebra and equations- the lack of homework has had devastating effects.

However, my case shouldn't be mistaken via the inclusion of algebra. Homework in primary school years can include fitness exercises, chores to complete around the home and even questions to ask your family and friends. These are all skilled building activities that are not inevitable unless homework is in place within out school. By doing homework, students can stay fit, learn good habits and build social abilities.

Finally we hit the crux of the affirmative's case, the common complaint of most pupils... 'much homework'. Whilst this is a vague term put forward by the negative, I believe that the benefits of homework mentioned above imply the fact that kids should do a lot of homework. It is highly beneficial and the workload can prepare them for the stresses of senior years.

Children under 16 should have homework. Thank you.
Debate Round No. 1
Victoria.Pham

Con

Victoria.Pham forfeited this round.
finn.b14

Pro

Ummmmm...
Debate Round No. 2
Victoria.Pham

Con

Victoria.Pham forfeited this round.
finn.b14

Pro

Does anyone know the correct way to address a forfeit? I just feel stupid every time I have to write something like this.
Debate Round No. 3
Victoria.Pham

Con

Victoria.Pham forfeited this round.
finn.b14

Pro

finn.b14 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
Victoria.Pham

Con

Victoria.Pham forfeited this round.
finn.b14

Pro

Children under the age of 16 should have homework. In fact, they should have 'much homework' as the long-term benefits are well worth the time and effort put into the tasks.
Debate Round No. 5
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