The Instigator
rachaelchow
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Stonewall
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Should there be more single sex schools in America?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 9/20/2013 Category: Education
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 589 times Debate No: 37964
Debate Rounds (3)
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rachaelchow

Pro

I believe that more single sex schools should be established around America for many reasons. That stating, both male and females would have an opportunity to experience a different learning environment.
Stonewall

Con

Best of luck!

I'll start by refuting your single point that "both male [sic] and females would have an opportunity to experience a different learning environment." A "different learning environment" is, by no means, a better one. This alone has no real ground for the argument of implementing single-sex schools, other than for experimentation. I do not like to experiment when it comes to a developing mind.

First, isolating a child to a building filled with other kids of the same sex is understandably bad for developing social skills. In the "real world," as I called it as a kid, we have to deal with men and women, people of different colors, and people of different social standings. Adolescents who have never had an experience with someone of the opposite gender (save for possibly family members) are not going to have the social skills to deal with them. Call it politically correct or not, men and women are very different creatures. We just are. We think and act differently in almost every way. Growing up with each other is vital to understanding the world as a whole, and since men and women make up 100% of it (LGBT's aside), without it, the first 18 years of life only "gets" half of it.

Next, supporting single-sex schools encourages gender stereotypes in the developing mind. This mirrors the days of racially segregated schools, where children grew to believe, "We go to different schools, so we must be very different." This is obviously a flawed way of thinking... we should grow with a respect for other people who "aren't so different after all." When grouped with others like them, boys and girls will merely encourage their own behavior, whereas when they mingle, they begin to adapt multiple ways of thinking based on their experiences.

Finally, there is little research to back up that isolating different sexes is better for them academically. According to former president of the American Psychological Association Diane Halpern, "N
euroscientists have found few sex differences in children’s brains beyond the larger volume of boys’ brains and the earlier completion of girls’ brain growth, neither of which is known to relate to learning ( 15)... certain sex differences have been reported (e.g., in brain activation patterns, auditory thresholds, memory performance) ( 16– 18), but none are substantial enough to justify different educational methods" (1).

1: http://womenstudies.wisc.edu...
Debate Round No. 1
rachaelchow

Pro

As I have experienced 8 years of being in a female school, I did learn to inhabit different views of things and learned many ways of thinking. Firstly, it is clear to society that males usually have a slower mind than the female and their brains do not start to develop until the later stages of their schooling, per say high school. Having two genders one being the group that begins to sprout quicker than the other, thus the group that has fallen behind will most likely stall the learning opportunity of the quicker thinking group. And generally, the slower group is usually males.
Single sex schools also allow students to focus on their studies and not begin thinking of having 'relationships', making their school work fall behind. However, as I am aware that some are homosexual, I fully believe in equality and I am stating as a whole, that more than 50% of people are not homosexuals.
Male schools tend to often be more physically rigorous than female schools. This saying, separating genders allow males to focus on more physical activities that not many females play, for example American football. Generally in high school, sports tend to focus on the male ground, therefore the female portion of sport teams aren't largely focused on, which could possibly lead to cutting female sport teams. However, in a single sex schools, all sport teams would have an equal chance in the school. A female school would not have to worry about the over powering of male sport teams. Also, male teams tend to have a bigger impact in school then female teams.

I wish you luck, thank you:)
Stonewall

Con

"Having two genders one being the group that begins to sprout quicker than the other, thus the group that has fallen behind will most likely stall the learning opportunity of the quicker thinking group."

I extend my argument from last time: "Neuroscientists have found few sex differences in children’s brains beyond the larger volume of boys’ brains and the earlier completion of girls’ brain growth, neither of which is known to relate to learning... certain sex differences have been reported (e.g., in brain activation patterns, auditory thresholds, memory performance), but none are substantial enough to justify different educational methods" (1). This negates any notion that co-ed schools hinder the performance of girls' education.

And, by your reasoning, if boys do hinder the education of girls, couldn't girls also encourage the learning of boys? It's not as though education is a one-way street. Your wording, in fact, supports my point in the previous round where "gender stereotypes in the developing mind" can be encouraged by same-sex schools. This suggested sexism, "(the slower group) will most likely stall the learning opportunity of the quicker thinking group... the slower group is usually males" when both sides are equally valid actually supports my claim.

"Single sex schools also allow students to focus on their studies and not begin thinking of having 'relationships', making their school work fall behind."

Many sources show time and again that relationships only affect students' grades if they already do poorly in school (2) (3) (4). I'd like to see any source describing how, exactly, relationships hinder learning. In said article, I'd also like to see how dozens of other factors inhibit learning- television, sports, family, friends (after all, boys grouped together do get more aggressive), and, of course, relationships formed outside of school- it's not as if public schools encourage relationships.

"Generally in high school, sports tend to focus on the male ground, therefore the female portion of sport teams aren't largely focused on, which could possibly lead to cutting female sport teams."

By that logic, if we don't even have the budget to keep both sports teams from getting cut, how are we supposed to implement same-sex schools in the first place? On another note, studies show that sports negatively affect women's grades, while also bettering men's (5, pg. 37)... maybe girl sports being cut isn't necessarily a bad thing? Overall, I feel as though academics should come first and foremost from a child's education, followed by athletics. Considering your argument hinges on equal opportunities, and most public schools do have equal opportunities for sports (or similar ones, i.e., softball and baseball, volleyball and football, etc.), this point doesn't really give any ground for the same-sex school argument.

1: http://womenstudies.wisc.edu...

2: http://blogs.ajc.com...

3: http://www.examiner.com...

4: http://www.foxnews.com...

5: http://econ.berkeley.edu...
Debate Round No. 2
rachaelchow

Pro

rachaelchow forfeited this round.
Stonewall

Con

Alrighty then. I enjoyed this debate greatly; thank you for it. Vote on what we discussed.
Debate Round No. 3
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