The Instigator
Its_Jay15
Pro (for)
Winning
3 Points
The Contender
DoctorFight
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points

Should we allow transgender people to use their preferred public bathroom?

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 1 vote the winner is...
Its_Jay15
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 4/12/2016 Category: Society
Updated: 10 months ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 545 times Debate No: 89577
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (3)
Votes (1)

 

Its_Jay15

Pro

I believe we should allow people who are transgender to go in to their preferred public rest room/toilet because they are that gender. Gender is a wide spectrum and some people do not even have a gender. Society boxes people in and so there is only male and female toilets, either way the toilets are there for the same reason. They are there for people to use. So why should gender impact where we go to use the toilet?
DoctorFight

Con

You're conflating sex and gender. Gender is a social construct. Sex is (arguably) not. The present multi-stall bathroom system is expedient. It sets out to cater to the needs of individual BIOLOGICAL SEX's lavatory needs: men's washrooms, for example, are fitted with specially suited devices for convenient and speedy urination (I am, personally, an advocate for the proliferation of the woman's urinal, which does exist).

This also may be a matter of putting the cart before the horse. While I've been to a number of events that touted unisex toilets with which there were no issues, they were usually pretty progressive affairs. I question whether general society is ready to embrace a unisex lavatory. I should also reinforce this with an anecdote: at a queer poetry night a couple weeks ago, a guy friend and I (also a guy) were lounging in the unisex washroom. On two occasions, a woman would peek in, notice that there were men in the washroom, and then peek out to patiently wait for us to leave, despite the abundance of places available for them to pee. They simply weren't comfortable with it or didn't feel safe - so, there, again, in a space full of supposed progressives, we couldn't allow ourselves to fully get past the arbitrary boundary around where we pee and who we pee with.

Plus this one concert I went to had unisex washrooms and basically people were just having sex in them all night.
Debate Round No. 1
Its_Jay15

Pro

I understand where your coming from when you say that people would feel uncomfortable using unisex toilets however, in the Transgender community a lot of people face discrimination when they go in to their assigned sex's bathroom. This is because they try and make themselves look more to the gender that they are. Being transgender myself and having experienced trans-phobia in a public restroom, i know that it is very intimidating and unfair, and I would much rather go in to the men's bathroom. But I would face discrimination there as well. So why is it such a problem for people who are transitioning to use their correct bathroom? Cant they go in to their preferred bathroom. I mean yes, unisex toilets are always an option but it is a risk for everyone due to the fact that sadly people can get assaulted. That being said it is still unfair that some trans people are so afraid of getting called out in the bathroom, that they go and use the disabled toilets. Its not fair and it should be allowed that trans people, no matter if they are transitioning from male to female or female to male they should be able to use which ever bathroom makes them feel comfortable without feeling afraid.
DoctorFight

Con

I think trans people are at risk whether the bathrooms are unisex or segregated; the problem isn't the bathrooms, it's the people who use them. An intimate space such as a washroom is going to be unsafe regardless. Only a transphobic person would accost someone for using the wrong bathroom, and it's those people who need to be educated and reduced.
Debate Round No. 2
Its_Jay15

Pro

Its_Jay15 forfeited this round.
DoctorFight

Con

DoctorFight forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
3 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 3 records.
Posted by Leugen9001 10 months ago
Leugen9001
Arguments go to Pro. In this debate, the main point of conflict was over which side would benefit trans people the most; other actors/agents weren't discussed. In round 1, Pro argued that it makes sense for people to go to the washroom that matches with their gender. In response, Con argued that washrooms are designed based on sex, not gender, and raises urinals as proof. In round 2, Pro argued that allowing trans people to use their preferred washroom can make them less afraid. Pro's round 2 point wasn't well contested, since Con simply argued that transphobia needed to be stopped but didn't prove that to be better than allowing trans people to use their preferred wahsrooms. Pro's arguments outweigh Con's in terms of impact, since being able to use a washroom comfortably and safely is more important than being able to stand up to pee when we clash Con's R1 response with Pro's R2 argument. Con's grammar was slightly better, with their correct use of semicolons, but wasn't enough to merit S/g/.
Posted by DoctorFight 10 months ago
DoctorFight
Gender's still arbitrary/a social construct. Compartmentalizing one's actions as being emblematic of another gender - arbitrary. But the first step is getting people to see gender as fluid, before dissolving it completely and allowing people to "be" without necessary labels.
Posted by Samcoder1 10 months ago
Samcoder1
Aren't transgenders proof that gender is not entirely a social construct? If it were a social construct, why would a boy, raised as a boy, taught to act like a boy, come out as a girl? This often happens in extremely conservative families and the transgenders are thus outcast. The transgender community is either the result of biological factors, which would strongly imply gender is NOT a social construct, or they are proof of society's insatiable desire to normalise mental illness. The evidence would appear to suggest the former, and so people have no right to deny others the right to be who they are on the inside. Sex is strictly a biological feature, only 'arguably' otherwise if a certain culture has certain traditions which would influence pre-natal hormone balances.
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by Leugen9001 10 months ago
Leugen9001
Its_Jay15DoctorFightTied
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Total points awarded:30 
Reasons for voting decision: rfd in comments