The Instigator
xxdogboy999xx
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
enderpigdebates
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Should we fund oil mines to make them safer?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 6/3/2014 Category: Economics
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 577 times Debate No: 55953
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (3)
Votes (0)

 

xxdogboy999xx

Pro

We should fund them so then we won't have incidents like the gulf of mexico. If we fund so they are more careful then the risk of accidents will lower down.
enderpigdebates

Con

Actually, I think we should not fund them and make it unallowed. Tons of deaths are form oil mining accidents and mining can hurt wildlife
Debate Round No. 1
xxdogboy999xx

Pro

xxdogboy999xx forfeited this round.
enderpigdebates

Con

With the recent oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, there has been outrage at BP's lack of planning which led to this environmental disaster. However, only some of the blame can lie with BP - similar disasters litter the history of offshore drilling (such as the Ixtoc 1 spill in the Gulf of Mexico 30 years ago), while spills from ships such as the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Alaska, and the Torrey Canyon in the UK have also illustrated the harm oil spills can cause to ocean-based ecosystems. Is it worth risking our renewable resources in the search for the last few non-renewables? We propose that governments with oil reserves off their coastline should pass laws, similar to the ban overturned by George W. Bush in 2008, that prevent new contracts for offshore drilling being given so that when existing contracts finish, companies would no longer be permitted to drill for deep oil deposits offshore.

All the Yes points
Offshore drilling poses environmental risks
Offshore drilling can cripple local economies.
The amount of oil in offshore deposits could easily be offset in other ways
We must invest in renewable sources
Oil spills are inevitable
It is all delaying and worsening the innevitable
England Summary
All the No points
Banning drilling is unfair to nations and responsible companies
Well-regulated, local offshore drilling has environmentally friendly effects
Offshore drilling has global economic benefits
Offshore drilling prevents environmentally-unfriendly effects
Summary (Mongolia)

Oil Companies Should Not Be Allowed To Drill Offshore

Yes because...No because...
Offshore drilling poses environmental risks
The environmental risk taken by offshore drilling is very topical, made evident by oil spills such as the recent BP oil spill and the Exxon Valdez oil spill in 1989 off the coast of Alaska. In the case of the Exxon Valdez spill up to 250,000 sea birds died, over 2,800 sea otters and thousands of other animals[[http://www.evostc.state.ak.us...]], (figures from the BP oil spill are not yet complete), having had a massive impact on the local wildlife and leading to a ban on all offshore drilling in America, until George Bush overturned it in 2008 - the recent oil spill suggests this repeal was a mistake. In this way, offshore drilling destroys ecosystems and fish stocks. These resources are vital for humanity to feed its population, and wasteland like much of the coast of southern USA is of no use until cleaned.

There is also a long term effect because the remaining species will have a lower heterozygosity index (the amount of allele variation within a species). This is important because if there is a change in selection pressure, such as a new disease, this could leave the remainder of the species vulnerable as they are less likely to survive because they are less likely to have a dormant allele that becomes advantageous.

The potential environmental risk is massive and thus offshore drilling should not be allowed because it can have such an effect on the environment, both in the short term and long term. Offshore drilling could lead to the extinction of various species, and a ban would be a sure way to help preserve biodiversity.
Modern technology used in new drilling rigs has dramatically reduced the risk of possible accidents and many factors have to stack up in order for accidents such as those of BP or Exxon Valdez to occur. Exxon Valdez's accident was caused by highly irresponsible practices such as strained workers and unfulfilled promises of higher technology equipment. [[http://bit.ly...]]
Furthermore, an example Exxon Valdez incident which occurred over 20 years ago, is already outdated. Safety measures and drilling equipment have been significantly improved by each decade, and risks of an accident are much lower today.
The second example the proposition has provided against offshore drilling can similarly be attributed to the irresponsible company. BP is a company known for its terrible safety track record blotched with frequent accidents that could have been easily prevented. It's safety regulation violations are numerous and it has been fined 760 times, the data of whose significance is further crystallized by oil giant ExxonMobil who has been, in comparison, fined only once.[[http://bit.ly...]]
Both of these examples show that the causes of these accidents were not the inherent danger of offshore oil drilling, but the highly irresponsible practices of the operating companies. If offshore drilling is performed according to the safety measures, regulated by the government, the practice has very small, if any, dangers. Countries like Brazil and Norway have had no major accidents comparable to that of BP. Norway, whose oil and gas offshore operations have safely and effectively co-existed with fishing operations since 1971 [[http://bit.ly...]], clearly demonstrates this. In fact, Norway is now the world's sixth largest oil producer and the tenth largest fish producer. The fact that there have been no major accidents in almost 40 years in Norway clearly shows that if offshore drilling is performed correctly dangers can be effectively prevented.
Offshore drilling can cripple local economies.
Another issue with offshore drilling is that if there is an accident it can cripple the local economy as it prevents people from fishing and because any oil spilt will end up affecting the wildlife, as earlier discussed, people will be prevented from fishing which is generally the largest source of income for many local areas. Fishing is important as it not only provides income for the fisherman but also to the restaurants that they sell to. Due to the recent BP disaster many restaurants along the coast line have had to close for weeks because they cannot get fish to sell in their restaurants. As a result of this the local economy has been crippled with many people unable to earn the money they need to be able to afford their basic living costs.
Fish numbers are not just temporarily cut following an oil spill, but drastically cut for a long time. There would therefore have to be very limited fishing in order to ensure that the fish stock does increase and is not lowered further. This means that the local economy will struggle for, potentially, years because they will not be able to fish as much as they did before the accident.
In the event of such complications, as it is in the case of BP, the oil companies are sometimes asked to pay the bill for both the clean-up effort and the efforts to restore peoples' quality of life (though off poorer coasts, this isn't always so). BP's bill now sums $6.1bn [[http://www.bbc.co.uk...]] This means that any offshore drilling has an associated risk of being unprofitable. But the success of other offshore wells mean that this is a risk oil companies continually make, gambling their profitability on offshore drilling. Legislation preventing offshore drilling would prevent companies from taking such costly risks.
Thus offshore drilling should be banned because can have a serious, long-term, effect on the local economy, or can cripple the oil company unfortunate enough to lose the game of Russian roulette.
The flaw we see in the proposition's argument is that it assumes that a disaster of a large scale necessarily occurs. As the opposition has shown in their refutation to the first arguments, large scale accidents are extremely rare (occurring approximately in 30-year intervals), and preventable. The periods in which disasters do not occur and offshore drilling contributes vastly to the economy outweigh by far the times when an accident happens.
Furthermore, offshore drilling is highly profitable for many reasons.
First of all, locally produced oil will reduce the price of oil for the nations, which can bring huge savings to the nation. Even a slight reduction in oil prices can have very significant benefits for a nation.
Secondly, offshore drilling jobs are very highly paying. The starting salary of an offshore drilling company employee stands minimally at about 3000$ per month [[http://ezinearticles.com...]] and higher.
Thirdly, the nations and states can collect large amounts of revenue in taxes and royalties from oil and gas drilling companies. The state of Louisiana in the U.S. for example, has made 1.5 billion USD in revenues in 2008 [[http://www.usatoday.com...]] and the profits have been projected to further increase. Residents of the state also benefit from high-paying jobs benefiting the state's economy even more.
In case of rare accidents that can have significant impacts on their vicinity that (as mentioned before and illustrated by examples of countries like Norway and Brazil) are highly unlikely (and we emphathically stress the "highly") when strict regulations are followed and observed, the company is responsible for all the damages its operations have caused and is made to make amends for the problems it caused. Therefore, fishing industries and businesses dependent on clean shores and beaches need not fear the problems that are highly unlikely
The amount of oil in offshore deposits could easily be offset in other ways
From the first two points it is clear that mining offshore oil deposits is, at least in some ways, undesirable. It is also unnecessary. The energy offshore deposits can provide pales in comparison to other options. The energy loss entailed by ending offshore drilling in the USA could, for example, be offset simply by wasting less food[[http://www.newscientist.com...]]
Debate Round No. 2
xxdogboy999xx

Pro

xxdogboy999xx forfeited this round.
enderpigdebates

Con

enderpigdebates forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
xxdogboy999xx

Pro

xxdogboy999xx forfeited this round.
enderpigdebates

Con

enderpigdebates forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
xxdogboy999xx

Pro

xxdogboy999xx forfeited this round.
enderpigdebates

Con

enderpigdebates forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
3 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 3 records.
Posted by alanesh 2 years ago
alanesh
WHO do you want to fund these? The companies that build and use them already get hundreds of millions of dollars from the US Government in the form of tax breaks and incentives.
The answer is not for citizens/governments to throw more money at the already ultra-profitable oil industry, but to increase REGULATIONS, forcing the oil companies to build safer systems.
Posted by Samreay 2 years ago
Samreay
I feel like a prerequisite question for this debate is to determine that more funding of the rigs will increase safety noticeably.
Posted by xxdogboy999xx 2 years ago
xxdogboy999xx
They should be funded. So we are safer to wildlife.
No votes have been placed for this debate.