The Instigator
hd1997
Con (against)
Tied
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The Contender
12momjosh12
Pro (for)
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Should we get vaccines

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 10/16/2014 Category: Health
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,073 times Debate No: 63365
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (7)
Votes (0)

 

hd1997

Con

I say that vaccines are evil and should go burn in the fiery depth of hell the are not needed and what kid wants to get poked and prodded at the doctors office. We should always banned vaccines and let the parents choose it they want their children to have them.
12momjosh12

Pro

nobody likes vaccine but its really important because

A vaccine is a biological preparation that improves immunity to a particular disease. A vaccine typically contains an agent that resembles a disease-causing microorganism and is often made from weakened or killed forms of the microbe, its toxins or one of its surface proteins. The agent stimulates the body's immune system to recognize the agent as foreign, destroy it, and keep a record of it, so that the immune system can more easily recognize and destroy any of these microorganisms that it later encounters.

Vaccines can be prophylactic (example: to prevent or ameliorate the effects of a future infection by any natural or "wild" pathogen), or therapeutic (e.g., vaccines against cancer are also being investigated; see cancer vaccine).

it fight desease.

Vaccines do not guarantee complete protection from a disease.[3] Sometimes, this is because the host's immune system simply does not respond adequately or at all. This may be due to a lowered immunity in general (diabetes, steroid use, HIV infection, age) or because the host's immune system does not have a B cell capable of generating antibodies to that antigen.

Even if the host develops antibodies, the human immune system is not perfect and in any case the immune system might still not be able to defeat the infection immediately. In this case, the infection will be less severe and heal faster.

Adjuvants are typically used to boost immune response. Most often, aluminium adjuvants are used, but adjuvants like squalene are also used in some vaccines, and more vaccines with squalene and phosphate adjuvants are being tested. Larger doses are used in some cases for older people (50"75 years and up), whose immune response to a given vaccine is not as strong.[4]

Maurice Hilleman's measles vaccine is estimated to prevent 1 million deaths every year.[5]
The efficacy or performance of the vaccine is dependent on a number of factors:

the disease itself (for some diseases vaccination performs better than for other diseases)
the strain of vaccine (some vaccinations are for different strains of the disease)[6]
whether one kept to the timetable for the vaccinations (see Vaccination schedule)
some individuals are "non-responders" to certain vaccines, meaning that they do not generate antibodies even after being vaccinated correctly
other factors such as ethnicity, age, or genetic predisposition.
When a vaccinated individual does develop the disease vaccinated against, the disease is likely to be milder than without vaccination.[7]

The following are important considerations in the effectiveness of a vaccination program:[citation needed]

careful modelling to anticipate the impact that an immunization campaign will have on the epidemiology of the disease in the medium to long term
ongoing surveillance for the relevant disease following introduction of a new vaccine
maintaining high immunization rates, even when a disease has become rare.
In 1958, there were 763,094 cases of measles and 552 deaths in the United States.[8][9] With the help of new vaccines, the number of cases dropped to fewer than 150 per year (median of 56).[9] In early 2008, there were 64 suspected cases of measles. Fifty-four out of 64 infections were associated with importation from another country, although only 13% were actually acquired outside of the United States; 63 of these 64 individuals either had never been vaccinated against measles or were uncertain whether they had been vaccinated.

The immune system recognizes vaccine agents as foreign, destroys them, and "remembers" them. When the virulent version of an agent is encountered, the body recognizes the protein coat on the virus, and thus is prepared to respond, by (1) neutralizing the target agent before it can enter cells, and (2) recognizing and destroying infected cells before that agent can multiply to vast numbers.

When two or more vaccines are mixed together in the same formulation, the two vaccines can interfere. This most frequently occurs with live attenuated vaccines, where one of the vaccine components is more robust than the others and suppresses the growth and immune response to the other components. This phenomenon was first noted in the trivalent Sabin polio vaccine, where the amount of serotype 2 virus in the vaccine had to be reduced to stop it from interfering with the "take" of the serotype 1 and 3 viruses in the vaccine.[20] This phenomenon has also been found to be a problem with the dengue vaccines currently being researched,[when?] where the DEN-3 serotype was found to predominate and suppress the response to DEN-1, W22;2 and W22;4 serotypes.[21]

Vaccines have contributed to the eradication of smallpox, one of the most contagious and deadly diseases known to man. Other diseases such as rubella, polio, measles, mumps, chickenpox, and typhoid are nowhere near as common as they were a hundred years ago. As long as the vast majority of people are vaccinated, it is much more difficult for an outbreak of disease to occur, let alone spread. This effect is called herd immunity. Polio, which is transmitted only between humans, is targeted by an extensive eradication campaign that has seen endemic polio restricted to only parts of four countries (Afghanistan, India, Nigeria, and Pakistan).[22] The difficulty of reaching all children as well as cultural misunderstandings, however, have caused the anticipated eradication date to be missed several times.

In order to provide best protection, children are recommended to receive vaccinations as soon as their immune systems are sufficiently developed to respond to particular vaccines, with additional "booster" shots often required to achieve "full immunity". This has led to the development of complex vaccination schedules. In the United States, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, which recommends schedule additions for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, recommends routine vaccination of children against:[23] hepatitis A, hepatitis B, polio, mumps, measles, rubella, diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, HiB, chickenpox, rotavirus, influenza, meningococcal disease and pneumonia.[24] The large number of vaccines and boosters recommended (up to 24 injections by age two) has led to problems with achieving full compliance. In order to combat declining compliance rates, various notification systems have been instituted and a number of combination injections are now marketed (e.g., Pneumococcal conjugate vaccine and MMRV vaccine), which provide protection against multiple diseases.

Besides recommendations for infant vaccinations and boosters, many specific vaccines are recommended at other ages or for repeated injections throughout life"most commonly for measles, tetanus, influenza, and pneumonia. Pregnant women are often screened for continued resistance to rubella. The human papillomavirus vaccine is recommended in the U.S. (as of 2011)[25] and UK (as of 2009).[26] Vaccine recommendations for the elderly concentrate on pneumonia and influenza, which are more deadly to that group. In 2006, a vaccine was introduced against shingles, a disease caused by the chickenpox virus, which usually affects the elderly.

Prior to the introduction of vaccination with material from cases of cowpox (heterotypic immunisation), smallpox could be prevented by deliberate inoculation of smallpox virus, later referred to as variolation to distinguish it from smallpox vaccination. This information was brought to the West in 1721 by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, who showed it to Hans Sloane, the (British) King's physician.[27]

Sometime during the late 1760s whilst serving his apprenticeship as a surgeon/apothecary Edward Jenner learned of the story, common in rural areas, that dairy workers would never have the often-fatal or disfiguring disease smallpox, because they had already had cowpox, which has a very mild effect in humans. In 1796, Jenner took pus from the hand of a milkmaid with cowpox, scratched it into the arm of an 8-year-old boy, and six weeks later inoculated (variolated) the boy with smallpox, afterwards observing that he did not catch smallpox.[28][29] Jenner extended his studies and in 1798 reported that his vaccine was safe in children and adults and could be transferred from arm-to-arm reducing reliance on uncertain supplies from infected cows.[1] Since vaccination with cowpox was much safer than smallpox inoculation,[30] the latter, though still widely practised in England, was banned in 1840.[31] The second generation of vaccines was introduced in the 1880s by Louis Pasteur who developed vaccines for chicken cholera and anthrax,[2] and from the late nineteenth century vaccines were considered a matter of national prestige, and compulsory vaccination laws were passed.[28]

The twentieth century saw the introduction of several successful vaccines, including those against diphtheria, measles, mumps, and rubella. Major achievements included the development of the polio vaccine in the 1950s and the eradication of smallpox during the 1960s and 1970s. Maurice Hilleman was the most prolific of the developers of the vaccines in the twentieth century. As vaccines became more common, many people began taking them for granted. However, vaccines remain elusive for many important diseases, including herpes simplex, malaria, and HIV.[28]

The influenza vaccination is an annual vaccination using a vaccine specific for a given year to protect against the highly variable influenza virus.[1] Each seasonal influenza vaccine contains antigens representing three (trivalent vaccine) or four (quadrivalent vaccine) influenza virus strains: one influenza type A subtype H1N1 virus strain, one influenza type A subtype H3N2 virus strain, and either one or two influenza type B virus strains.[2] Influenza vaccines may be administered as an injection, also known as a flu shot, or as a nasal spray.

okay enjoy your time on getting vaccines and feel better!!
Debate Round No. 1
hd1997

Con

hd1997 forfeited this round.
12momjosh12

Pro

12momjosh12 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
hd1997

Con

First off my opponent coppied without siting the source and second vaccines hurt the small children I dont want them to cry it is not worth it and second why do the young kids need toget hurt every time they go to the doctors
12momjosh12

Pro

12momjosh12 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
hd1997

Con

We should ban vaccines for every one
12momjosh12

Pro

12momjosh12 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
7 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 7 records.
Posted by SebUK 2 years ago
SebUK
'Passion is Good, Emotion is Bad
Passion is a driving force in almost everything we do, but when emotion is tossed into that mix things can go downhill fast. When you are debating on Debate.org try to keep emotion out of your arguments. Debate.org is a place for fun and relaxation; not drama and stress. However tempting it may be, always refrain from using personal or general insults. It is not only rude, but against the terms of service as well.'
Posted by SebUK 2 years ago
SebUK
'I can only pray that con is a troll. If not, I propose that we sterilize him/her.' Unfortunatly I do not think she is as much as I share your feelings , Con somebody must tell you this so let it be me . You are an awful debater there is a reason why you lost 30 out of 42 debates. You are and I mean this with no offense wasting other debaters time. If you choose to stay on this website please use sources , learn how to spell better and don't use emotional arguments but rational arguments that make sense oh and of course do not use 'bulling' (Badly spelt) as an excuse to avoid criticism.
Posted by hd1997 2 years ago
hd1997
@Anti_Theist1 I am not a troll they can call me what you want but in the end you are bulling me
Posted by Wylted 2 years ago
Wylted
Pro clearly plagiarized. He didn't even bother to erase the article he stole from's citation numbers, lol.
Posted by Anti_Theist1 2 years ago
Anti_Theist1
I can only pray that con is a troll. If not, I propose that we sterilize him/her.
Posted by hd1997 2 years ago
hd1997
what the hell are you talking about
Posted by numberwang 2 years ago
numberwang
troll debate, nice
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