The Instigator
cachora
Pro (for)
The Contender
ryan15
Con (against)

Smoking

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 11/17/2016 Category: Society
Updated: 2 weeks ago Status: Debating Period
Viewed: 78 times Debate No: 97096
Debate Rounds (5)
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cachora

Pro

Why is cigarette smoking considered the leading preventable cause of death in the United States? Describe the health consequences of smoking cigarettes. What categories of people are most and least likely to smoke? Has the smoking hazard always been recognized? Why, in your opinion, is cigarette smoking still as common as it is in this country?
ryan15

Con

First and for most i would like you to be welcome to this debate and i would ike you to be clear on what you are asking what is your stance on smoking or is smiking bad or ood for you ?
Smoking leads to disease and disability and harms nearly every organ of the body.1
More than 16 million Americans are living with a disease caused by smoking.
For every person who dies because of smoking, at least 30 people live with a serious smoking-related illness.
Smoking causes cancer, heart disease, stroke, lung diseases, diabetes, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which includes emphysema and chronic bronchitis.
Smoking also increases risk for tuberculosis, certain eye diseases, and problems of the immune system, including rheumatoid arthritis.
Smoking is a known cause of erectile dysfunction in males.
Smoking is the leading cause of preventable death.
Worldwide, tobacco use causes nearly 6 million deaths per year, and current trends show that tobacco use will cause more than 8 million deaths annually by 2030.2
Cigarette smoking is responsible for more than 480,000 deaths per year in the United States, including nearly 42,000 deaths resulting from secondhand smoke exposure. This is about one in five deaths annually, or 1,300 deaths every day.1
On average, smokers die 10 years earlier than nonsmokers.3
If smoking continues at the current rate among U.S. youth, 5.6 million of today"s Americans younger than 18 years of age are expected to die prematurely from a smoking-related illness. This represents about one in every 13 Americans aged 17 years or younger who are alive today.1
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