The Instigator
DirtRoadAnthem
Pro (for)
Winning
8 Points
The Contender
redlife000
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points

Soda Vending Machines Should Be Taken Out Of High Schools

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 2 votes the winner is...
DirtRoadAnthem
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/4/2011 Category: Health
Updated: 6 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 6,382 times Debate No: 15130
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (0)
Votes (2)

 

DirtRoadAnthem

Pro

Soda has been proved to be an unhealthy beverage. It has been linked to diabetes, weak bones, damage to teeth, and harm to major organs. It is known that students spend a majority of their day in school, and if soda is accessible to them in school, there is no limit to the amount of soda they can consume. This can lead to unhealthy lifestyle choices. If soda is not accessible in school, students are less likely to consume large quantities, therefore hopefully preventing severe health issues in the future.
1-"Soda is loaded with high-fructose corn syrup, a sweetener that has been linked to obesity. Soda consumption also has been linked to the development of type 2 diabetes, both due to its sugar content and its effects on the body's hormones."
2-"...increased soft drink consumption may be linked to chronic kidney disease "

http://www.everydayhealth.com...|21761|soda%20health%20facts||S|b|7169680272&gclid=CKqS772stqcCFYh_5Qodt2DiBg
redlife000

Con

Hello. This is my first debate on this site, however, this issue means quite a bit to me. I would like to start by saying that I am a senior in high school, so I have a little bit of background with the topic. Now, on to the debate itself.

I would like to start with your first point. "It has been linked to diabetes, weak bones, damage to teeth, and harm to major organs." This all may be true about soda, but it is also true for many other drinks and food items as well. The only reason it is linked to soda is, as you said, the amount of consumption.

This brings me to my second point. Having vending machines in school does not lead to an increase of consumption. That is entirely up to each individual student's desire to maintain health. If students want to drink soda, they will buy it outside of school and bring it with them, or wait and drink large amounts at the end of the day. This means that removing the machines just makes it less convenient. It doesn't prevent anything.
Debate Round No. 1
DirtRoadAnthem

Pro

There is no argument that if a student wanted to bring soda to their school they could. The fact is that students do not need to bring it from home, because it is provided in schools. Where there is accessibility, there will be use, and there will be abuse. Having no vending machines in the schools removes accessibility to the unhealthy drinks during the school day. By taking away the accessibility in the schools, students are forced to purchase alternative drinks, such as water, or natural juices. By being exposed to these drinks they may not rely on soda as their main beverage. Personally, I have not had a Pepsi in almost a year. I began drinking water, and natural juices, and by not having soda accessible to me I realized that these drinks can be delicious and are definitely the better choice. I also began losing some weight, and feeling better. I had friends in high school who used the soda vending machine at least two to three times a day. That's about 33 tsps of sugar in school.
redlife000

Con

A major flaw with your reasoning is the statement, "Where there is accessibility, there will be use, and there will be abuse." While I agree there will be use, abuse does not come from the presence of vending machines. As I said before, abuse comes from an individual person's desire to maintain their own health. Should they decide to buy two or three sodas per day, it is their choice. However, by removing vending machines, the majority of students who drink pop as a "once in a while treat" can no longer have that. By not being able to have what they want during school, they will buy what they want outside of the school. Also, pop is often much cheaper outside of schools (an example being my school, where pop is $2/bottle, opposed to a six pack for $3.50-$4.00). If they are forced to buy pop outside of school at these less expensive rates, they will be able to buy, and therefore drink, more. It then could be said that removing the machines would lead to abuse outside of school.
Debate Round No. 2
DirtRoadAnthem

Pro

Schools are supposed to promote healthy lifestyles, and I feel by having a soda machine in a hallway it is defeating the purpose of promoting healthy living. Rather than a student spending the $2.00 on a soda, they would be able to buy a water for $1.50, or a bottle of Vitamin water zero for $2.00. By substituting these healthier choices for soda, students may feel more compelled to live healthy. The choice, as u say, is ultimately up to the students, which it is, but it should be the school boards who help may the students make the smarter choices. Even the people selling the products feel compelled to provide the healthier choices. "Coca-Cola, PepsiCo have voluntarily agreed to stop selling high-calorie sodas and sugary drinks, ... Instead, the beverage manufacturers, which stock about 90% of all school cafeterias and vending machines, will supply students with only bottled water, low-fat and nonfat milk and 100% fruit juice."
http://www.time.com...
redlife000

Con

If it comes down to the school promoting healthy living, much more than just vending machines need changing. The food offered in cafeterias needs to be changed, food portions reduced, and classes like P.E. or weights should become mandatory for all students. Yet, if the change you are talking about, or these other changes, are made, students will feel oppressed. They will think that the school is trying to decide what they should or shouldn't drink, can or can't eat, must or must not do. And, just like in a family where the parents control the children extensively, this doesn't lead to acceptance. It leads to rebellion. The best way to promote a healthy life style is to offer classes about it (maybe hold a big event in the gym or auditorium for the whole school) and then give them the options. When they feel they are treated as adults with their own opinions, they will actually think about their actions, instead of just choosing to do what they are told they can't normally.
Debate Round No. 3
No comments have been posted on this debate.
2 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Vote Placed by RoyLatham 6 years ago
RoyLatham
DirtRoadAnthemredlife000Tied
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Total points awarded:50 
Reasons for voting decision: This debate boils down to evidence that if soft drinks are banned consumption would actually drop. Pro finally got around to that with a reference. Con offered no counter-evidence.
Vote Placed by Cliff.Stamp 6 years ago
Cliff.Stamp
DirtRoadAnthemredlife000Tied
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Total points awarded:30 
Reasons for voting decision: "By substituting these healthier choices for soda, students may feel more compelled to live healthy" - oppression was not strong counter to this point, it is not as if schools were banning soft drinks, just not providing them.