The Instigator
Capitalistslave
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Juliegirl
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Street addresses should not be required in order to register to vote.

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Post Voting Period
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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 11/17/2016 Category: Politics
Updated: 2 weeks ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 138 times Debate No: 97092
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (5)
Votes (0)

 

Capitalistslave

Pro

Round 1: introduction of position and acceptance.
Round 2: Argument/reasons for your position
Round 3: Counter-argument/conclusion

Ok, since the last person I debated with somehow misconstrued "address" to mean a name, when if I meant name I would have said name, and the argument I made didn't make any sense if I meant name... I decided to be more specific and I said "street address" in the name of the debate.

Since some people on here seem to be ignoramuses, "street address" refers to the number on a residence and the name of the street one lives on. I refer only about the requirement that a voter has to have a street address in order to register.

Hopefully this is clear this time, and if it's not, it's on the fault of the con since this should be plenty clear.

Now, I believe that street addresses should not be required in order to register to vote.
Juliegirl

Con

I accept. I believe that a street adress should be required in order to register to vote.
Debate Round No. 1
Capitalistslave

Pro

Now, the reason why I think addresses should not be required for voter registration, is because this prevents the homeless from voting. Ever since 1856, every state had outlawed the requirement that you must own property in order to vote. [1, pg 16] Because the homeless do not have an address, they essentially cannot vote and, I would argue, it violates these laws.

In addition, and this will be anecdotal evidence, which I realize is not strong evidence, but I'm using it anyways, people who fail to report address changes are given a more difficult time to vote too because of the address requirement. One person, while I was working as a poll worker for the 2016 general election, had moved just within the prior week, and tried going to the precinct for which his new address was in the borders of. He was denied a regular ballot, and had to vote provisionally. While they still got to vote, and it can be argued their vote will still count, it caused an unnecessary extra step needed to vote since he had to fill out paper work. In addition, his vote would not be counted until much later since it was a provisional ballot.

In addition, voter turnout is already so low, it's been below 60% in most recent election years [2] and there is no good reason to have something else to complicate the voting process that could potentially cause less people deciding to vote.

One argument a person may make for why we need addresses is in order to determine which voting precinct one is supposed to go to. However, as a poll worker, I know there is a map we have which shows what geographical area votes at which voting location. These could be posted someplace for everyone to find out, online, or perhaps in the city hall of the city. The person, when registering, could then mark which area they reside, rather than reporting your address, and they will be going to that precinct. I know also voting material is usually received in the mail, however, sample ballots are not necessary, to have to begin with. In addition, the process could be that they are offered at city hall and if you want one, you can get one there. I would also suggest for those who do want to receive them in the mail, then instead of having the registration require an address, it could be optional. This way, vote my mail and ballots can still be mailed to those who do have addresses if they so choose to divulge their address.

I'll now give my opponent the opportunity to argue their case.

Sources:
[1] http://economics.yale.edu...
[2] http://www.electproject.org...
Juliegirl

Con

People who vote in the polls should have to show an address because they should have to show that they have skin in the game just like everybody else. That's also why they should have to show ID's at voting places to verify who they are.
Debate Round No. 2
Capitalistslave

Pro

There isn't exactly much to rebut in con's argument. Con should have elaborated on what they mean with "...they should have to show that they have skin in the game just like everybody else." I don't know what to say since I don't even know what they mean.

So, in conclusion, I believe I won this debate since I provided well thought-out reasons, sources, and logic, while my opponent provided very little. Unless they offer a lot more in round 3, it seems this should be a debate easy to vote for.
Juliegirl

Con

Everybody pays taxes. People pay property taxes, income taxes, hell in Maryland we used to pay a RAIN TAX. If one is homeless, then they're not paying property taxes on their house or in many cases they aren't paying an income tax. They are also a lot of times on welfare which alone should disqualify them. After all, if the takers outnumber the makers then the whole country will collapse. The homeless, until they get on their feet, are not contrubuting much to society as a whole so they really, until they're contributing, shouldn't have a say in anything. Everybody who has an address is paying property taxes and most likely income taxes and so they are the people who would be most affected by what the homeless people, who don't have to deal with the concequences of what they vote for, do.
Debate Round No. 3
5 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 5 records.
Posted by Capitalistslave 2 weeks ago
Capitalistslave
@sboss18 That is possible. There are maps showing what area each polling place covers, so we could just say if you live in this area, that is your polling place.
Posted by sboss18 2 weeks ago
sboss18
I think he means if you don't have a street address, how would you know which polling place to go to?
Posted by Capitalistslave 2 weeks ago
Capitalistslave
MagicAintReal: or am I misreading what you mean? It sounds like your questions have to do with the street address of the voting place.
Posted by Capitalistslave 2 weeks ago
Capitalistslave
Magicaintreal: Are you serious? You found another way to misconstrue this? I'm saying a voter shouldn't be required to have a street address. Of course the voting precinct would have a street address.
Posted by MagicAintReal 2 weeks ago
MagicAintReal
If there's no street address, where do you send your registration?
Also without a street address, how would you know where your polling place is?
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