The Instigator
boss1
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
andrewbarnard94
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Teens should get their phones unlimited

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 2/13/2014 Category: Technology
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 501 times Debate No: 45850
Debate Rounds (4)
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Votes (0)

 

boss1

Pro

I believe teens should get their phones unlimited. I believe there should be some parental checks but a phone to a teenager isn't just a phone. it is a sign of trust and responsibility. it is a connection that keeps them into the world, you might think it is a way out of the world but in reality it is just a door to amazing things. when parents let their teens have their phones without limitation it is a mental "I trust you with this and I believe you will only do good" which can be such an uplifting feeling. when there are limits on everything it can hurt them mentally because they feel unworthy of anything leading to bad behavior. you may see this as just a phone but to them it is their only power which can feel great.
andrewbarnard94

Con

My opponent has used some fairly sloppy grammar, so I'm not sure in some instances what point he is trying to make. But as a starting point, most parents pay for their teen's phone bill, at least younger teens, so it would seem only fair for the parent to impose guidelines. Of course a significant variable is the age of the teen, as an eighteen-year-old would obviously want more flexibility than a thirteen-year-old. I'll assume we're mainly discussing younger teens, since most older teens would be using their own phone, naturally changing the dynamics.

How does a phone enable the opening of a door to amazing things? And why is unrestricted use of a phone a major way to enable a teen to feel responsible? I would like to see my opponent expound on this. And it must be realized that all adults, even phenomenally successful ones, will need to cope with laws and restrictions that they may not embrace. So it isn't necessarily bad for a teen to learn to live with restrictions. All adults face them in the real world.

Also, studies have shown that cell phones can have a negative influence on their users, distracting from studies, as well as hindering social growth. If not used in moderation, cell phones can take over one's life, with the constant action coming from texting and social media. As Robert Piper says on Huffington Post: "We need to take back control of our minds and stop compulsively checking our emails, Facebook updates, and text messages. I think we can live a happier and more compassionate world if we tune into ourselves and the people we are speaking with. How many relationships are lost because of lack of communication? Think about what a parent is doing to a child's emotional well-being when they're focused on their cell phone rather than their children." http://www.huffingtonpost.com...
Debate Round No. 1
boss1

Pro

These teens have grown up in a world of technology. It is part of their generation's life. Something a teen needs to be successful is a healthy mind. When I say it opens doors I mean it could assist in a bright future. Not only in the sense that they could study on their smart phones, but go out with friends and have a social life. I'm not saying no restrictions, obviously there are restrictions in life but a cell phone could help create skills used in the real world. It can help create healthy relationships or find healthy ways to get rid of stress. These days a phone is not just a phone, you can share with the world your ideas and beliefs. What wasn't possible 15 years ago is now possible and that can be a dramatic generational change. Someone being bullied before Internet could have paid for a therapist and maybe have gotten support but they still wouldn't have any genuine friends. Someone being bullied now could post a video on youtube and find people to talk to, share with and gain support and friendship from. Which one is better? It's obvious.
There are things you can't go to your parents for so you turn to friends or Internet, if you don't have either of those you can't learn or find out and always have things in the back of your mind yearning an answer. When you have your phone you can look it up or ask, get the answer and move on in your life.

When they get their phone it makes the teen feel like they have trust from their parents, it makes them feel more mature and responsible. Constant taking away is sort of teasing and making it an uncertain part of your life. I don't mean they cant survive without their phones but when a parent doesn't trust you to have your phone and takes it away just because they can is hurtful. If you were driving on a road and all of a sudden someone comes out of nowhere and takes away your car you wouldn't know what to do. if your car stopped you would just walk because you know it will be there when you come back.

How could a teen be distracted from studies if their phones are what they use to study, I don't understand how a phone could inhibit social growth if that is how they reach out socially.

What you are talking about is addiction, I'm saying you could use your phone to assist you in everyday life as a tool to live. I'm not saying they live on their phones maybe parents do but teens have come from a whole different child hood. to parents a cell phone could be a big deal because they haven't had it their whole life but when a cell phone is always there it becomes not such a big deal. I think a person should grow up thinking it should be no big deal but when it is constantly being taken away it is given more value.
andrewbarnard94

Con

I understand a phone can be very handy, both in acquiring information and studying, as well as providing social interaction. But if used too much, it can distract one from regular social life. I understand that phones can be used for social interaction, but no technology can replace face-to-face interaction. I think we've all seen individuals who were so caught up in their phones that they failed to notice actual people who were right in front of them. This isn't socially healthy, nor does it prepare kids for the real world. As nice and convenient as it is to be able to communicate with friends through texting/social media, there is no way this can substantiate one's entire social outlook. There is a much greater degree of friendship developed through actual interaction with friends. A problem today is that young people have spent so much time texting their friends that when they get together they don't know what to say and end up spending a lot of their time texting other peers who aren't with them at the time.

Let's tie this into the original question and the matter we're debating, which is whether or not parents should have guidelines for their teens' phones. I'd argue that they should, as a way of helping their teens learn to deal with the challenges technology poses. A young teen with a new phone will likely not have the insight to see the dangers that come from overuse. And of course a phone gives a teen access to all kinds of information and influence that the parents may not want their teen exposed to, for good reason. There's a lot in the world that isn't suitable for teens to be viewing (or adults for that matter!) and a parent should be concerned that their child be kept safe from this. And of course there is also the issue of cyber-bullying, which could be prevented by a parent keeping track of what is going on with a teen's phone.

I believe with you that a phone can be used as a tool, and try to use mine that way. But addiction is very real. Along with the other dangers I list above, it is something that few teens will have the maturity to overcome on their own. Actually, restrictions may help keep a teen from ever dealing with addiction. If they don't have constant access to their phones (or restrictions on their phones when in their hands), they won't be as susceptible to addiction.

All around, I agree that a phone is a powerful tool, but it should be very clear that it can be abused. It's only fair for parents to want to monitor their teen's phone usage. This is doubly true when the parent is paying the bill, which is probably the definite majority of cases.
Debate Round No. 2
boss1

Pro

boss1 forfeited this round.
andrewbarnard94

Con

andrewbarnard94 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
boss1

Pro

boss1 forfeited this round.
andrewbarnard94

Con

andrewbarnard94 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
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