The Instigator
Ziang
Con (against)
Winning
4 Points
The Contender
Realism101
Pro (for)
Losing
0 Points

That we should change the Australian flag.

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 1 vote the winner is...
Ziang
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 5/17/2016 Category: Politics
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 353 times Debate No: 91357
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (1)
Votes (1)

 

Ziang

Con

Welcome, ladies and gentleman. I will be discussing the negative side of today's topic. More specifically, I will be discussing that Australian's flag is already known internationally and that it is expensive to change Australian's flag.
Realism101

Pro

Yes, it should be changed to the 🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸🇺🇸 USA USA
Debate Round No. 1
Ziang

Con

Dear opponent, why should we change our current flag to the USA one? We were a colony of England, but we were never American.

My first point is that the Australian"s flag is already recognised internationally. The officials had used the current flag during important events such as the United Nation"s meeting. The Sydney 2000 Olympic and Paralympic games resulted in the Australian National Flag being proudly and enthusiastically waved before an estimated television audience of 3 billion viewers. This international exposure has dramatically increased knowledge and recognition of Australia and its flag. Now that the Australian National Flag is over 100 years old and has been placed centre stage on the world arena, it is one of the most easily recognised and respected flags of the world. Over the last 100 years Australia's flag has travelled to many locations around the world in the custody of our soldiers during war and conflict. Every day French school children at towns and villages along the Western Front still raise the Australian flag as a tribute to the 'diggers' who died liberating their homes during WW1. Many national flags are tricolour or bicolour designs (stripes) which to many are indistinguishable from one another. After all it is not of vital importance that people from other countries continue to instantly recognise our flag, what really matters is that individual Australians can recognise and understand the importance and significance of their national flag of "Stars and Crosses".

My second point for this debate is that it will be expensive to change the current Australian flag. Because of Australia is tied to the United Kingdom, if we want to change our flag, Australia will have to become a republic, which is not a cheap thing to do. John Key, current New Zealand Prime Minister had said that it would cost at least $30 million to change a nations flag. Australia is part of the British Commonwealth of Nations, a league of countries that recognize the British monarch as a secular ruler within their state government, which essentially means that although they are former territories of the British Empire, they still pay some sort of homage to the Crown; since the King/Queen has no actual clout within the civil governments of the British Commonwealth, the flags are used to represent their partial loyalty to the Crown by having the trademark Union flag in the top-left corner. This is why the British Virgin Islands, New Zealand, Bermuda, Fiji, and the Hawaii state flag have a Union Jack in their flag, because at some point they were subject to British influence. In the case of Australia, it was used as a prison island for British criminals when prisons became full. These prisoners, while deserted, were still British citizens, which is why Australia has and will continue to have a Union Jack on their flag. If Australia wanted to remove it from their flag, they would essentially have to leave the Commonwealth of Nations, which I highly doubt would be plausible since Great Britain and the United States are the two largest trading partners that Australia has.
Realism101

Pro

Because MURICA!
Debate Round No. 2
Ziang

Con

In conclusion, the two important points that I have covered in this debate is that Australian flag is already known internationally as it used in all important events that Australia participating and it is not cheap to change the current Australian flag because we were tied to the Britain Empire. John Key, current New Zealand Prime Minister had said that it would cost at least $30 million to change a nations flag. The sheer cost alone should tell you that we should never change the Australian flag.
Realism101

Pro

In conclusion, my hypothesis is that Australia is its own independent nation, but yet the flag still bears the flag of Great Britain. Australia and New Zealand are the only two nations that have gained independence, and kept the motherland flag as part of their own. To reiterate my point, Australia is its own nation and has its own unique history. The Austrailian flag should be changed to represent two things; Australia's independence, and it's own struggles in its history. My last comment or question rather, what price would you put on the Austrailian people's individuality?
Debate Round No. 3
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by lwittman 1 year ago
lwittman
Well, Pro has me sold so far.
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by lord_megatron 11 months ago
lord_megatron
ZiangRealism101Tied
Agreed with before the debate:Vote Checkmark--0 points
Agreed with after the debate:Vote Checkmark--0 points
Who had better conduct:Vote Checkmark--1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Made more convincing arguments:Vote Checkmark--3 points
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Total points awarded:40 
Reasons for voting decision: Con barely gave any arguments for his point, at round 2 all his argument was "because MURICA" which is a violation of conduct. Con argued that the Australian flag shouldn't be changed as it is known all over the world and would have additional costs, which pro didn't rebut.