The Instigator
birdlandmemories
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
TN05
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points

The NFL should keep the current overtime system

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Post Voting Period
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It's a Tie!
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 11/23/2013 Category: Sports
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 857 times Debate No: 41095
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (1)
Votes (0)

 

birdlandmemories

Con

First round is for acceptance.
TN05

Pro

I'll take this one on.
Debate Round No. 1
birdlandmemories

Con

Thank you, TN05, for accepting this debate.

The current overtime system consists of one 15 minute overtime period. The team that wins the coin toss normally gets the ball first. If a match has not been decided when the 15 minute overtime period ends, the game ends in a tie. If you win the toss and get a field goal on your first possession, the other team needs at least a field goal in order to extend the game. If you score a touchdown on your first possession, you win the game.
http://www.nfl.com...

There are numerous flaws with the system that will be explained below:


Fairness

With the current overtime system, if a team wins the coin toss, they have a significant advantage over the team that doesn't win the coin toss. All they have to do is score a touchdown, and they win the game. The other team does not get the ball, and have a chance to get a touchdown as well.

Ties

During a tie, no team wins the game, and the game is not counted as a win or a loss for either team. Ties occur when the 2 teams have failed to win after the 15 minute overtime period. Usually, no team scores, but on some occasions, the two teams get a field goal on their 1 possessions, and then fail to score there after. In a recent poll conducted by ESPN, 71 percent of people were found to have disliked ties, while 20 percent had no opinion on them, and 9 percent liked them.

No coaches challenges

Another problem with the current overtime system, is the fact that coaches are not able to challenge calls made by the officials. All reviews are decided by the officials, so if a coach has a problem with a certain call, he is not able to challenge the ruling on the field.

I await my opponent's opening arguments.



TN05

Pro

I agree that my opponent's definition of the overtime system is factually correct; this is the system I will be defending.

The NFL overtime system is among the most sensible in the world. In football, a sport notable for its high-contact and injury-prone nature, it is necessary to create an overtime system that will end the game when it needs to end, but not be unfair to either side. The current system achieves just that.

Because a touchdown from either side is enough to win it, and a field goal only wins it if the first team to have the ball doesn't score, teams must plan accordingly. This is a strategic element that directly complements the strategic element of the game itself, and can create some fascinating scenarios. If you have a 4th and goal at the 2 on your first possession, do you go for the win and hope your defense can hold if you miss, or do you kick the field goal and hope your defense can hold? Do you take the wind (like Bill Belichick did in last night's overtime win over the Bronco) or the ball in a rough-weather game? These scenarios are fun to watch and add immensely to the drama of an NFL game, much more so than the overtime system in college football, soccer, basketball, or hockey.

To respond to my opponent's issues:
*If fairness was a major issue and the receiving team had a major advantage over the kicking team, why would coaches even consider kicking to the wind? Just last night Bill Belichick's Patriots chose this against a Peyton Manning-led Broncos and won.[1]
*Ties are unsightly, yes, but are a necessary evil. Nobody wants a tie, and nobody wants to play to one, but if neither team can win it in a 15-minute overtime period in the regular season, they don't deserve a win. Ties encourage teams to be aggressive, which is why there have only been 19 ties since the introduction of overtime in 1974 and only six ties since 1990.[2]
*No coaches challenges is actually a net positive for both teams, as any questionable play can and likely will be challenged by the booth - coaches don't have to risk losing a valuable timeout in a game that can be decided by time.

References:
1. http://www.businessinsider.com...
2. https://en.wikipedia.org...
Debate Round No. 2
birdlandmemories

Con

birdlandmemories forfeited this round.
TN05

Pro

My opponent has forfeited his round. I extend all of my arguments into round 3.
Debate Round No. 3
birdlandmemories

Con

birdlandmemories forfeited this round.
TN05

Pro

Extend all arguments into round 4. Vote Pro!
Debate Round No. 4
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by birdlandmemories 3 years ago
birdlandmemories
I would like to apologize to my opponent for the two forfeited rounds. Voters, please award my opponent conduct, as well as arguments. Thank you.
No votes have been placed for this debate.