The Instigator
Tupacisalive96
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
kingkd
Pro (for)
Winning
7 Points

The New World Order

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Post Voting Period
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after 1 vote the winner is...
kingkd
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 4/6/2015 Category: Politics
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 888 times Debate No: 72988
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (1)
Votes (1)

 

Tupacisalive96

Con

During the 20th century, many politicians, such as Woodrow Wilson and Winston Churchill, used the term "new world order" to refer to a new period of history characterised by a dramatic change in world political thought and the balance of power after World War I and World War II. They all saw the period as an opportunity to implement idealistic proposals for global governance in the sense of new collective efforts to address worldwide problems that go beyond the capacity of individual nation-states to solve, while always respecting the right of nations to self-determination. These proposals led to the creation of international organizations (such as the UN and NATO), and international regimes (such as the Bretton Woods system and the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT)), which were calculated both to maintain a balance of power in favor of the United States and to regularize cooperation between nations, in order to achieve a peaceful phase of capitalism. These creations in particular and liberal internationalism in general, however, were regularly criticized and opposed by American ultraconservative business nationalists from the 1930s on.[10]

Progressives welcomed these new international organizations and regimes in the aftermath of the two World Wars, but argued that they suffered from a democratic deficit and were therefore inadequate not only to prevent another global war but to foster global justice. The United Nations was designed in 1945 by US bankers and State Department planners, and was always intended to remain a free association of sovereign nation-states, not a transition to democratic world government. Thus, activists around the globe formed a world federalist movement, hoping in vain to create a "real" new world order.[11]

British writer and futurist H. G. Wells went further than progressives in the 1940s, by appropriating and redefining the term "new world order" as a synonym for the establishment of a technocratic world state and planned economy.[12] Despite the popularity of his ideas in some state socialist circles, Wells failed to exert a deeper and more lasting influence because he was unable to concentrate his energies on a direct appeal to the intelligentsias who would ultimately have to coordinate a Wellsian new world order.[13]

During the Red Scare of 1947"1957, agitators of the American secular and Christian right, influenced by the work of Canadian conspiracy theorist William Guy Carr, increasingly embraced and spread unfounded fears of Freemasons, Illuminati and Jews being the driving force behind an "international communist conspiracy". The threat of "Godless communism", in the form of a state atheistic and bureaucratic collectivist world government, demonized as the "Red Menace", therefore became the main focus of apocalyptic millenarian conspiracism. The Red Scare came to shape one of the core ideas of the political right in the United States, which is that liberals and progressives, with their welfare-state policies and international cooperation programs such as foreign aid, supposedly contribute to a gradual process of collectivism that will inevitably lead to nations being replaced with a communist one-world government.[14]

Right-wing populist advocacy groups with a producerist world-view, such as the John Birch Society, disseminated a multitude of conspiracy theories in the 1960s claiming that the governments of both the United States and the Soviet Union were controlled by a cabal of corporate internationalists, greedy bankers and corrupt politicians who were intent on using the U.N. as the vehicle to create a "One World Government". This right-wing anti-globalist conspiracism fuelled the Bircher campaign for US withdrawal from the UN American writer Mary M. Davison, in her 1966 booklet The Profound Revolution, traced the alleged New World Order conspiracy to the creation of the US Federal Reserve in 1913 by international bankers, who she claimed later formed the Council on Foreign Relations in 1921 as a shadow government. At the time the booklet was published, "international bankers" would have been interpreted by many readers as a reference to a postulated "international Jewish banking conspiracy" masterminded by the Rothschilds.[14]

Claiming that the term "New World Order" is used by a secretive elite dedicated to the destruction of all national sovereignties, American writer Gary Allen"in his books None Dare Call It Conspiracy (1971), Rockefeller: Campaigning for the New World Order (1974), and Say "No!" to the New World Order (1987)"articulated the anti-globalist theme of much current right-wing populist conspiracism in the US. Thus, after the fall of communism in the early 1990s, the main demonized scapegoat of the American far right shifted seamlessly from crypto-communists, who plotted on behalf of the Red Menace, to globalists, who plot on behalf of the New World Order. The relatively painless nature of the shift was due to growing right-wing populist opposition to corporate internationalism, but also in part to the basic underlying apocalyptic millenarian paradigm, which fed the Cold War and the witch-hunts of the McCarthy period.[14]

In his speech, Toward a New World Order, delivered on September 11, 1990 during a joint session of the US Congress, President George H. W. Bush described his objectives for post-Cold War global governance in cooperation with post-Soviet states. He stated:
(NWO Speech)

Until now, the world we've known has been a world divided"a world of barbed wire and concrete block, conflict and cold war. Now, we can see a new world coming into view. A world in which there is the very real prospect of a new world order. In the words of Winston Churchill, a "world order" in which "the principles of justice and fair play ... protect the weak against the strong ..." A world where the United Nations, freed from cold war stalemate, is poised to fulfill the historic vision of its founders. A world in which freedom and respect for human rights find a home among all nations.
- George H. W. Bush
kingkd

Pro

What is this debate?
NO matter what it is,I win automatically as Con violated TOS by plagiarizing

https://books.google.com...
Debate Round No. 1
Tupacisalive96

Con

im just doing this so i can write my opinion
kingkd

Pro

That wasn't your opinion, that was the author's of the book you plagiarized
Debate Round No. 2
Tupacisalive96

Con

Tupacisalive96 forfeited this round.
kingkd

Pro

kingkd forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
Tupacisalive96

Con

Tupacisalive96 forfeited this round.
kingkd

Pro

kingkd forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by n7 2 years ago
n7
What is this debate about? All you did was copy and paste the Wikipedia section on the history of the term new world order.
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by Gabe1e 2 years ago
Gabe1e
Tupacisalive96kingkdTied
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Total points awarded:07 
Reasons for voting decision: Plagiarism is an automatic victory. Pro wins.