The Instigator
lahunken61
Pro (for)
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The Contender
Dr.1up
Con (against)
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The Real Sixth Sense

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 10/28/2015 Category: Health
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 265 times Debate No: 81715
Debate Rounds (5)
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lahunken61

Pro

When people hear "the sixth sense" they think of something mystical, but, there is a real sixth sense that not all people notice: magnetism. Magnetic fluxes are closed circuits of the one substance, energy, in the one substance, energy. The most personal magnetic fluxes are the polarizations of the the iron in the cytochromes that close and open the doors of every cell. These fluxes, facing out, are counterclockwise in males, and, facing out, clockwise in females. Counterclockwise and clockwise are the real polarities. The repulsion of like polarities clashing against their closed circuits is seen by many people as "flaming" white white light "brighter than the sun". This is caused by the repelling like polarities clashing against the closed circuits of the iron in the cytochromes of the cells of the optic nerves. Of course, it also causes magnetic stress in all the other cells causing other feelings. It was explained in a past issue of Discover Magazine that this sensitivity is the cause of a sense of direction.
Dr.1up

Con

I will argue against your claim that humans have a sixth sense (a sense of direction) that is made possible via magnetic fluxes which affect the cytochromes in our optic nerves.

In order to understand how this outdated theory was proven wrong, you have to understand what cryptochrome is.

You see, cryptochrome is an ancient protein that can be found in our cytochromes and there are different versions of it in all branches of life. In most cases, these proteins help control daily rhythms. Humans, for example, have two cryptochromes -CRY1 and CRY2- which help to control our body clocks.

Your confused (but imaginative) theory was cooked up in the year 2011, by a scientist named Lauren Foley. She found that CRY2 can double as a magnetic sensor.

Foley worked with Drosophila flies, which can normally sense magnetic fields using cryptochome. You can show this by placing them in an artificial magnetic field and training them to head in a specific direction in search of food. Normal flies can do this easily. Mutants that don't have the cry gene, which makes the cryptochrome protein, lose the ability to find their meal.

To restore their internal compass, Foley simply has to give the mutant flies extra copies of cry. Fascinatingly, she found that the human version of the gene works just as well. When she loaded her mutant flies with human CRY2, she found that they could sense magnetic fields like their normal peers. Foley also found that human cryptochrome is sensitive to blue light. It only managed to restore the flies' magnetic sense when they were bathed in this color.

These simple experiments did show that human cryptohrome can act as a magnetic sensor, but this doesn't mean that it does act as a magnetic sensor. Much less that humans can somehow use it sense magnetic fields.

Plugging human cryptochrome into an alien environment like the body of a fly tells you next to nothing about what it does in its native surroundings. To sense the magnetic field, one does not only need a molecule like cryptochrome, but also an apparatus that picks up the changes in that molecule and mediates it to the brain. Drosophila flies obviously have this apparatus, but humans?

... Nope

Humans have no such apparatus. Thus, we cannot naturally use cryptochrome (and consequently, cytochromes) to tell us anything about the world around us in the way that our five senses can.

This sixth sense simply doesn't exist. So why did we ever think it could? Why did Discover Magazine write an article about this theory just a few years ago?
One of the biggest reasons is this:

Because it's cool! It's fun to think that we could have some sort of sixth sense! Plus, it sells more copies of Discover Magazine when the front cover says, "You have a sixth sense that you didn't even know about!"
rather than, "You could have a sixth sense... If you were a fly."
Debate Round No. 1
lahunken61

Pro

lahunken61 forfeited this round.
Dr.1up

Con

I rest my case
Debate Round No. 2
lahunken61

Pro

lahunken61 forfeited this round.
Dr.1up

Con

Dr.1up forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
lahunken61

Pro

lahunken61 forfeited this round.
Dr.1up

Con

Dr.1up forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
lahunken61

Pro

The magnetic fluxes of the cytochromes of the neurons of the optic nerves are repelled by magnetic fluxes of like polarity, counterclockwise versus counterclockwise, and, clockwise versus clockwise, which conveys to the magnetically aware brain the sight of flaming white light brighter than the sun. This is also the basis of sense of direction. The cytochromes elsewhere in the body also sense magnetic conditions. Native Americans usually have this sixth sense. I know. I have it.
Dr.1up

Con

Dr.1up forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
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