The Instigator
Huitt85
Pro (for)
Tied
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The Contender
brianjustin3709
Con (against)
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0 Points

The United States federal government should substantially curtail its domestic surveillance.

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 7/16/2015 Category: Politics
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,105 times Debate No: 77765
Debate Rounds (3)
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Huitt85

Pro

Privacy/totalitarianism. There are many different ways to understand "privacy," an idea originally articulated by Samuel D. Warren and Louis D. Brandeis in 1890[1]. These include the right to be left alone, the right to be secure in one"s person, the right to have certain information about one kept secret, the right to to associate with who one wishes without interference[2].

The threat to privacy from any type of surveillance is significant because it involves monitoring of individuals. In many instances, people expect what is being monitored to otherwise be private.

Mass surveillance is especially intrusive. The continuous and indiscriminate surveillance they accomplish is damaging because it violates reasonable expectations of quantitative privacy, by which we mean privacy interests in large aggregations of information that are independent from particular interests.

Therefore, If we cease the surveillance, our government will be in ruins. We wouldn't know how to handle ourselves, hence the reason you should vote for the affirmative.
brianjustin3709

Con

Decision from Senate majority leader to vote on NSA reform appears to clear way for passage of bill that would curb bulk collection of Americans" phone records
Under the reform, the NSA would still be able to acquire thousands of call records based on a single court order. Photograph: Patrick Semansky/AP
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Limitations on wholesale reform
Many privacy groups lament that the legislation McConnell has now agreed to move to the Senate floor provides an insufficient response to two years" worth of outrage over widespread US surveillance. The US government has long held up section 215 of the Patriot Act to justify the dragnet collection of American phone records, but the first program was first revealed last June by the Guardian based on documents obtained from Snowden.
The bipartisan architects of the USA Freedom Act in the House of Representatives have for months predicted boxing surveillance advocates into the untenable position in which McConnell found himself: under the pressure of a wholesale loss of a Patriot Act provision beloved by the FBI but without the votes to reauthorize the provision unless they sacrificed the NSA"s daily collection of millions of US phone records.Since the House voted overwhelmingly last week to pass the USA Freedom Act, opposition mounted to McConnell"s preferred alternative of an unabridged reauthorization of what is known as the Patriot Act"s Section 215. McConnell lacked the votes for a two-month extension of Section 215 in the Senate and the House considered it a nonstarter. New polls showed broad and deep bipartisan antipathy to broad government surveillance.Yet the USA Freedom Act only bars the use of section 215 for collecting US phone data in bulk. Other domestic surveillance authorities, including the DEA"s recently disclosed bulk phone records collection, would remain untouched, as would the NSA and FBI"s ability to search without a warrant through its bulk of internet content and metadata for Americans" communication
Debate Round No. 1
Huitt85

Pro

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brianjustin3709

Con

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Debate Round No. 2
Huitt85

Pro

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brianjustin3709

Con

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Debate Round No. 3
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