The Instigator
EAT_IT_SUKA
Pro (for)
Winning
3 Points
The Contender
gonnabealawyer
Con (against)
Losing
1 Points

The act of docking a non-working dog's tail should not be legal

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Post Voting Period
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after 1 vote the winner is...
EAT_IT_SUKA
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/18/2015 Category: Miscellaneous
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 733 times Debate No: 71895
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (9)
Votes (1)

 

EAT_IT_SUKA

Pro

This debate is about non-working [1] dog tail docking [2]. My thesis shall be: 'The act of docking a non-working dog's tail should not be legal.' My opponent's thesis shall be: 'The act of docking a non-working dog's tail should be legal.'

This debate has conditions, though. Any information gained from the Internet needs to have a link that leads to where you got the information from. Any book research needs to have the title, author, chapter, page and paragraph of the book you got the information from. No opinions can be accepted as evidence unless the opinion is that of an expert [3] (if the opinion is that of an expert, you need to state the name and occupation of the expert that has that opinion). I will ask CON to not post their arguments in the comments section if they run out of space. The format for this debate will go as follows:
Round 1) Acceptance of the debate--No Arguments
Round 2) Opening Arguments--No Rebuttals
Round 3) More Arguments/Rebuttals
Round 4) Summary of Arguments/Impact Turns/Conclusion--No New Arguments/Refutes

You may make a part 2 of one of your opening arguments in round 3 if you wish, CON. If CON forfeits round 2, not giving me a chance to refute in round 3, and then comes back in round 3 and makes arguments and refutes mine, I think its only fair if I get to refute his arguments in round 4, as he didn't give me a chance to refute in round 3. I will not mention or accept any evidence that involves tail bobbing--that is not part of the debate. We both have the burden of proof--I have to prove that the act of docking a non-working dog's tail should be illegal, whereas CON has to prove that the act of docking a non-working dog's tail should be legal. Please realise that you only have 24 hours to respond to a post.

By accepting this debate, you also accept all conditions above and all definitions below. Any violation of conditions above and/or definitions below will result in a win for the non-offender. With that, good luck, CON.

[1]-working dog is a canine working animal, i.e., a type of dog that is not merely a pet but learns and performs tasks to assist and/or entertain its human companions, or a breed of such origin--so a non-working dog would be a dog that is just a pet that doesn't learn and perform tasks to assist and/or entertain its human companions, or a breed of such origin.

Reference for a definition of a working dog:
http://en.wikipedia.org...

[2]-Docking is the removal of portions of an animal's tail.*Note: This definition only concerns dogs in this debate*

Reference:

http://en.wikipedia.org...

[3]-A person who has enough knowledge and experience in a field to be a reliable source in a specific part of that field (eg: an elementary school teacher is an expert in elementary education)

*Note: My own definition*


gonnabealawyer

Con

Docking a dog's tail should not be illegal if it is done right. Docking a dog's tail should not harm the dog, and if the dog is domestic, it should not effect the dog's survival skills.
Debate Round No. 1
EAT_IT_SUKA

Pro

Thank you CON for accepting this debate. Let's jump right into it...

=== CONTENTION 1: TAIL COMMUNICATION ===
Dogs use their tails to communicate with other dogs, as well as humans. This is evidenced by Emily Anthes, who wrote the article 'Dog Tails and Social Signaling: The Long and the Short of It. [1].' She stated:

'My dog’s tail is a study in perpetual motion. It wags when he’s happy and when he’s nervous, when he leaves a room and when he enters one, when he stands in a doorway snorting at me in an attempt to communicate his desperate desire for a walk or a toy or a treat. Even late at night, when I’m reading in bed and he’s asleep on the floor beside me, I’ll hear the thwap! thwap! thwap! of his tail, twitching while he slumbers.'


The article then stated:

'Dogs may not have voices, but they have very active tails, and they rely heavily on these furry appendages to communicate. A fast, wagging tail can signal excitement and playfulness, whereas a tail tucked between the legs is a sign of submission. A dog that’s feeling aroused, confident, or aggressive may hold his tail up high, while a relaxed pooch lets his tail hang down lower and looser. These tail movements provide important clues about how a dog is feeling–especially to other canines that may be sharing the same sidewalk or dog park.'

Then finally:

'I recently came across an ingenious little study that illuminates this problem. The study–run by two biologists at Canada’s University of Victoria and published in the journal Behavior in 2008–makes use of my new favorite experimental apparatus: a life-sized robotic dog. The faux dog–made of synthetic fur, wire, and cotton–resembled a black Lab and had two different detachable tails: one short (9 cm in length) and one long (30 cm). A motor mounted inside the dog’s wire frame allowed the researchers to make both of these tails move using a remote control. The scientists set the robotic dog out in “areas of high off-leash domestic dog activity” in Canada, and videotaped nearly 500 different real dogs approaching the impostor under four different conditions: when the robot’s tail was long and still, long and moving, short and still, and short and moving. The results varied according to the size of the dogs the researchers were observing. Dogs smaller than the robot were cautious in approaching the impostor, regardless of the tail length and movement. Of course, such caution makes sense when dealing with a strange beast that could be twice your size. It was among the large dogs that the interesting behaviors emerged. These dogs were most likely to approach the robotic model when the robot had a long, moving tail. (They did so 91.4% of the time.) That makes sense, the researchers say. “Because the long tail was @258;exible, the simulated motion appeared to us to resemble that of a loose, wagging tail of a real dog,” they write. This kind of loose wag is often an invitation to play–and a social signal that the wagging dog means no harm. On the other hand, a dog that is holding its tail perfectly still isn’t giving off such obvious “come hither” signals, and large dogs approached the robot with a long, still tail significantly less frequently–only 74.4% of the time. But when the researchers swapped the long tail for the short one, these preferences disappeared. Large dogs approached a short-tailed robot with a wagging tail just as often as one with a motionless tail (85.2% and 82.2% of the time, respectively). These findings suggest that the dogs were less able to discriminate between a tail that’s wagging playfully and one that’s standing still and erect when the tail itself is short. “It appears that the signals communicated by differences in tail motion were most effectively conveyed when the tail was long,” the scientists write. The large dogs were also twice as likely to pause while approaching the short-tailed models, perhaps using that time to try to decipher whether they should continue moving closer. As the researchers put it in their paper, “As the efficacy of a visual signal is related to its visibility … it may be that larger dogs had a harder time interpreting the ‘intentions’ of the model when the tail was short.” Taken together, the findings suggest that docking a dog’s tail may impair its ability to communicate effectively with its canine comrades. And it’s yet another reason–if there weren’t enough already–to put a stop to the cosmetic amputation of dog tails.'


Also, an article called 'The Purpose of a Dog's Tail,' [2] states:


'Spreading Scent

Dogs communicate on many levels, one of which is spreading their scent – which is another function a dog’s tail performs. According to PetPlace.com, there are two anal glands located right under a dog’s tail that contain a liquid with a unique smell, specific to that individual animal. When a dog wags their tail, the muscles around the anus contract and press on the anal glands, releasing the dog’s particular scent. To further spread the scent, the dog’s wagging tail acts as a fan. You may have noticed how an alpha dog carries his tail high. That’s because holding the tail upright will allow the dog to release more of his scent. Alternatively, a submissive dog tucks his tail between his legs, which prevents other dogs from sniffing him. Submissive and frightened dogs do not want other dogs to sniff them because they want to keep a low profile and not call attention to themselves.'

You see, docking a dog's tail gets rid of it's primary ability to communicate with other dogs and humans.

=== CONTENTION 2: TAIL AGILITY ===
The same article, 'The Purpose of a Dog's Tail,' states:


'Physical Functions

A dog’s tail performs various important functions; it provides the counterbalance necessary to perform difficult maneuvers such as climbing, jumping or walking along slim structures. Many fast running dogs have long, slender tails that improve their agility and serve as a counterbalance when they make sharp turns while traveling at high speeds. By contrast, dogs bred for swimming usually have thick, strong tails that can function as a rudder in the water. Sled dogs are known for their fluffy, bushy tails that serve as insulation. At rest, these dogs often wrap their tails over their faces to shelter themselves from the frigid weather. So there you have it. A dog’s tail does more than simply wag when he’s happy. Now you can impress your friends and family with dog tail trivia.'

Also, an article called 'What's the deal with... tails?' [3] states the following:

'In canines, a tail may also serve as a type of rudder to help stabilize dogs in the water. In some cases, it can also entertain a bored dog who will chase it in relentless circles.'

=== CONTENTION 3: PAIN IN TAIL DOCKING ===
The article 'Canine Tail Docking FAQ,' [4] states:


'Q: Is tail docking painful?

A: Tailing docking is painful.The intensity or duration of the pain under ideal or typical circumstances is difficult to quantify. Painful procedures conducted in the neonatal period when the nervous system is vulnerable can result in negative long-term changes which affect how pain is processed and perceived later in life.'

The article 'Painful Procedures for Dogs,' [5] states:

'Puppies are normally just a few days old when their tails are docked. They are generally not even given any anesthetics to numb the pain of having their tails cut off. Compassionate veterinarians object to the arbitrary removal of body parts used for communication, balance, and expression.'

The article 'Dog Tails and Social Signaling: The Long and the Short of It,' states:

'That’s another reason, experts have argued, to object to tail docking, a barbaric procedure in which several inches of a puppy’s tail are amputated, often without anesthesia. The pain and suffering that cosmetic tail docking can cause are reason enough to oppose the practice, and they are, indeed, the most commonly mentioned objections. Less often discussed, however, is the possibility that removing most of a dog’s tail may actually hamper its ability to communicate with the rest of its species.'
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CON stated the following last round:

'Docking a dog's tail should not be illegal if it is done right. Docking a dog's tail should not harm the dog, and if the dog is domestic, it should not effect the dog's survival skills.'

CON hasn't told us what 'docking a dog's tail right' means, so I request that (s)he does so. I will not refute any arguments because it would be a violation of conditions.

A dog's tail allows it to communicate with other dogs and humans and enhances its agility. Docking the tail of a dog removes a primary way of communication, affects its agility greatly and causes harm, both short-term and long-term. The act of docking a non-working dog's tail should not be legal.

Vote PRO.

[1]- http://blogs.plos.org...
[2]- http://www.canidae.com...
[3]-http://www.vetstreet.com...
[4]-https://www.avma.org...
[5]-http://www.peta.org...





gonnabealawyer

Con

The dog's tail is not crucial to its survival in the world, especially for domesticated dogs, which are the dogs who's tails are usually removed. If anything, it should be illegal to remove a service dog's tail, because they use them the most. http://www.dogsbestlife.com... states that "The only reason that [tale-docking] made since, were for safety and cleanliness [reasons]. Working and hunting dogs were less likely to collect debris or amass feces around their rump. They were also less apt to getting caught in farm equipment, wagons, and carts." This being said, for working dogs, tail-docking helped them.
(With the exception of service dogs,) Most dogs are tail-docked for cosmetic purposes. If the owner has done their research, then they would understand how much dogs use their tails to convey emotions, and accept the sacrifice. Tail-docking of puppies does not hurt them, and if the owner of the dog is fit to be a pet-owner, they will either tail-dock the dogs when they are puppies, or laughing gas them, so the process is easier on the puppies.
Debate Round No. 2
EAT_IT_SUKA

Pro

REBUTTALS:
1) 'The dog's tail is not crucial to its survival in the world, especially for domesticated dogs, which are the dogs who's tails are usually removed.'

While it may not be crucial to survival in the world, it is still very useful for communication and agility. What if a dog had to run away from a threat such as another dog? It's tail could save its life. Dogs are pack animals, so communication makes interaction with other dogs much easier.

2) 'If anything, it should be illegal to remove a service dog's tail, because they use them the most.'

Drop. That statement is irrelevant because this debate doesn't involve working dogs.

3) 'http://www.dogsbestlife.com...... states that "The only reason that [tale-docking] made since, were for safety and cleanliness [reasons]. Working and hunting dogs were less likely to collect debris or amass feces around their rump. They were also less apt to getting caught in farm equipment, wagons, and carts." This being said, for working dogs, tail-docking helped them.'

CON says: '"The only reason that [tale-docking] made since, were for safety and cleanliness [reasons]. Working and hunting dogs were less likely to collect debris or amass feces around their rump.' However, this debate is not about working dogs, but about pet dogs. Even if this debate involved working dogs, this debate is not about rumps, but tails, and tails cannot be much work. Also, James Serpell, PhD, director of the Center for the Interaction of Animals and Society at the University of Pennsylvania, argues that docking itself could be considered an injury. On the other hand, he says, “research shows that an intact tail is unlikely to become injured, and if it does, injuries are usually minor and heal easily' [1].

4) '(With the exception of service dogs,) Most dogs are tail-docked for cosmetic purposes. If the owner has done their research, then they would understand how much dogs use their tails to convey emotions, and accept the sacrifice.'

Drop. That statement is irrelevant. Just because the owner 'accepts the sacrafice,' doesn't mean that tail docking is right.

5) ' Tail-docking of puppies does not hurt them, and if the owner of the dog is fit to be a pet-owner, they will either tail-dock the dogs when they are puppies, or laughing gas them, so the process is easier on the puppies.'

CON says that 'Tail docking of puppies does not hurt them,' but that statement is totally unwarranted. There is no source. (S)He seems to not respond to my last contention in round 2: 'They are generally not even given any anesthetics to numb the pain of having their tails cut off.'' ''That’s another reason, experts have argued, to object to tail docking, a barbaric procedure in which several inches of a puppy’s tail are amputated, often without anesthesia.' I gave sources. Nitrous oxide, or laughing gas, happens to be used as an anaesthetic [2].

CON's post in round 1 stated the following:

'Docking a dog's tail should not be illegal if it is done right. Docking a dog's tail should not harm the dog, and if the dog is domestic, it should not effect the dog's survival skills.'

CON still hasn't told us what 'docking a dog's tail right' means. Docking a dog's tail does harm the dog, and does affect its survival skills.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
=== CONTENTION 1: COSMETICS ===
Even CON stated: '(With the exception of service dogs,) Most dogs are tail-docked for cosmetic purposes.'

DEFINITION OF 'COSMETICS':
noun
1.
a powder, lotion, lipstick, rouge, or other preparation for beautifyingthe face, skin, hair, nails, etc.
2.
cosmetics, superficial measures to make something appear better,more attractive, or more impressive:

REFERENCE:
http://dictionary.reference.com....

So that means that most dogs are tail docked just to look nicer. I've already demonstrated that tail docking causes pain and decreases a dog's communication skills and agility, so it shouldn't be worth your dog looking nicer if you lose 2 important skills and causes pain in a dog.

=== CONTENTION 2: NEUROMA ===
According to the article 'Ear Cropping and Tail Docking; Should You or Shouldn't You?' [3], states:

'
Docked tails can also develop a neuroma, or nerve tumor. This can cause pain and make your dog snappy if her tail is touched. Studies show that dogs communicate emotions like anger and excitement by wagging their tails, so docking 'may interfere with your dog’s ability to interact with other dogs,' says Andy Roark, a veterinarian at Cleveland Park Animal Hospital in Greenville, S.C.'

Also, the article 'Confession of the Week: My Dog Eats his Tail' [4] states:

'Ever since we brought Logan home, he’s always bothered with his nub (aka his tail). I remember pointing out to the vet on his first puppy check-up, the irritated scab he had on the tip of his little nub. The vet said it looked that Logan was chewing on his tail. So, with that, they gave him 10 days worth of anti-biotics (which I gave him), to help with the healing, and was told to keep an eye on it.'

It then says:

'A friend of mine, who’s also a Doberman mom, was able to track down some very interesting information for me. I think Logan’s tail has a name.

TAIL DOCK NEUROMA.
Have you ever heard of this?
Nope. I’ve never heard of it either.

Amputation neuromas (traumatic neuromas) are non-neoplastic, disorganized proliferations of peripheral nerve parenchyma and stroma that form in response to amputation or traumatic injury. They are most commonly identified after tail docking in dogs or neurectomy in the distal extremities of horses. The most common clinical presentation is a young dog that continuously traumatizes its docked tail. In horses, such a lesion appears as a firm, often painful swelling at a neurectomy surgery site. Excision is curative.

Neurofibromas and neurofibrosarcomas (perineuromas, neurilemmomas, nerve sheath tumors, hemangiopericytomas, neurothekomas, schwannomas) are spindle-cell tumors that arise from the connective tissue components of the peripheral nerve. They are believed to arise from Schwann cells, but they could also arise from mesenchymal cells, which produce the nonmyelinated connective tissues that surround the myelinated nerve fiber. In dogs, forms of this tumor can be virtually indistinguishable from hemangiopericytomas and may be the same tumor.

Luckily, his tail isn’t as sensitive as it could be (I can touch it, etc), so I think it’s just a matter of getting him to leave it alone for a few days. I’m sure a new bone will help with that part! I’m very hesitant about surgery to repair it, although, I know it would fix it completely.'

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I have shown the audience that docking a dog's tail takes away a primary form of communication, makes the dog less agile, causes long-term and short-term pain, causes tail dock neuroma, and people do all of this in non-working dogs because it makes the dog look nicer. However, it doesn't seem to make dogs look nicer:

The act of docking a non-working dog's tail should not be legal
Tail-Docked Doberman

The act of docking a non-working dog's tail should not be legal
Non-Tail Docked Doberman

Therefore, vote PRO.

[1]- http://pets.webmd.com...
[2]-http://en.wikipedia.org...
[3]- http://pets.webmd.com...
[4]- http://thehydrantblog.com...





gonnabealawyer

Con

Rebuttals:

1)"The dog"s tail is crucial for communication and agility".What if a dog had to run away from a threat such as another dog? It"s tail could save it"s life."

In this case, we are talking about domesticated dogs. Domesticated dogs are very rarely put in a case where they are running away from another dog, and if so, this is because of the owner. The owner should then be looked at, not the process if docking the dog"s tail. A domesticated dog, (see citation 1) means that the dog is domesticated, which means that the animal is tamed and kept as a pet or on a farm. Which in my previous argument I proved that tail-docking helped farm dogs. Pet dogs should be closely watched, then they wouldn"t be in a chase situation. Plus, some of the most aggressive and agile dogs, like the pit bull, have docked tails.

2) "They [dogs] are generally not given anesthetics to numb the pain of tail-docking"

Maybe you should be arguing that anesthetics should be required before tail-docking.This is the fault of the owner, and/or the vet, not the fault of the process.

3) Docking a dog"s tail right, in my opinion means offering anesthetics first. (Because this wasn"t clear in my previous statement. This being said, docking a dog"s tail for cosmetic purposes/ "so it looks nicer" would not harm the dog, if the tail-docking process was done right. (See previous definition of right.) And on top of that tail-docking is the owner"s decision.

Citations:
1: http://www.oxforddictionaries.com...
Debate Round No. 3
EAT_IT_SUKA

Pro

Before I begin my summary and conclusion, I would like to point out that CON was unable to respond to my argument that tail docking causes tail dock neuroma. (S)He also didn't respond to my argument that a dog's tail is important when it comes to communicating, consider the fact that even if dog's were given anaesthetics while docking the tail, tail docking can cause long-term pain or respond to the fact that dogs with docked tails don't look any nicer than dogs with un-docked tails. *Note: Sources are not necessary in summary*

SUMMARY OF PRO'S ARGUMENTS:
A dog's tail is a tool for communication. Emily Anthes stated: 'My dog’s tail is a study in perpetual motion. It wags when he’s happy and when he’s nervous, when he leaves a room and when he enters one, when he stands in a doorway snorting at me in an attempt to communicate his desperate desire for a walk or a toy or a treat. Even late at night, when I’m reading in bed and he’s asleep on the floor beside me, I’ll hear the thwap! thwap! thwap! of his tail, twitching while he slumbers.' A recent study where real dogs were to approach a fake dog with its tail in different positions each time stated: 'These dogs were most likely to approach the robotic model when the robot had a long, moving tail. (They did so 91.4% of the time.) That makes sense, the researchers say. “Because the long tail was @258;exible, the simulated motion appeared to us to resemble that of a loose, wagging tail of a real dog,” they write. This kind of loose wag is often an invitation to play–and a social signal that the wagging dog means no harm. On the other hand, a dog that is holding its tail perfectly still isn’t giving off such obvious “come hither” signals, and large dogs approached the robot with a long, still tail significantly less frequently–only 74.4% of the time. But when the researchers swapped the long tail for the short one, these preferences disappeared. Large dogs approached a short-tailed robot with a wagging tail just as often as one with a motionless tail (85.2% and 82.2% of the time, respectively). These findings suggest that the dogs were less able to discriminate between a tail that’s wagging playfully and one that’s standing still and erect when the tail itself is short. ' Finally, a dog has two anal glands that give off the dog's scent to other dogs, and when that scent is released, the tail wags, acting as a fan to blow the scent around.

A canine's tail also helps it with agility, allowing it to 'A dog’s tail performs various important functions; it provides the counterbalance necessary to perform difficult maneuvers such as climbing, jumping or walking along slim structures. Many fast running dogs have long, slender tails that improve their agility and serve as a counterbalance when they make sharp turns while traveling at high speeds. By contrast, dogs bred for swimming usually have thick, strong tails that can function as a rudder in the water. Sled dogs are known for their fluffy, bushy tails that serve as insulation. At rest, these dogs often wrap their tails over their faces to shelter themselves from the frigid weather. So there you have it. A dog’s tail does more than simply wag when he’s happy. Now you can impress your friends and family with dog tail trivia.' While a domesticated dog is probably not going to need these agility skills, it could still save the dog in the rare occasion that it gets chased or any other similar situation.

Tail docking causes long-term and short-term pain in a dog. Anaesthetics are generally not given to numb the pain, and if people aren't going to give anaesthetics then tail docking should be banned. Also, t
he article 'Canine Tail Docking FAQ,' states: Tailing docking is painful. The intensity or duration of the pain under ideal or typical circumstances is difficult to quantify. Painful procedures conducted in the neonatal period when the nervous system is vulnerable can result in negative long-term changes which affect how pain is processed and perceived later in life.' That is yet another reason tail docking should be banned.

Dog's tails are docked usually to look nicer, which is totally unfair because docking a dog's tail removes its primary ability to communicate, removes it agility and gives the dog long and short-term pain. I've also demonstrated that a tail-docked-dog doesn't even look nicer than a non-tail-docked-dog:

The act of docking a non-working dog's tail should not be legal
Tail-Docked Doberman

The act of docking a non-working dog's tail should not be legal
Non-Tail-Docked Doberman

Finally, docking a dog's tail causes something called tail dock neuroma. The article 'Ear Cropping and Tail Docking; Should You or Shouldn't You?' states: 'Docked tails can also develop a neuroma, or nerve tumor. This can cause pain and make your dog snappy if her tail is touched. Studies show that dogs communicate emotions like anger and excitement by wagging their tails, so docking 'may interfere with your dog’s ability to interact with other dogs,' says Andy Roark, a veterinarian at Cleveland Park Animal Hospital in Greenville, S.C.' Also, Also, the article 'Confession of the Week: My Dog Eats his Tail' states: ''Ever since we brought Logan home, he’s always bothered with his nub (aka his tail). I remember pointing out to the vet on his first puppy check-up, the irritated scab he had on the tip of his little nub. The vet said it looked that Logan was chewing on his tail. So, with that, they gave him 10 days worth of anti-biotics (which I gave him), to help with the healing, and was told to keep an eye on it.' It then says: 'A friend of mine, who’s also a Doberman mom, was able to track down some very interesting information for me. I think Logan’s tail has a name.

TAIL DOCK NEUROMA.
Have you ever heard of this?
Nope. I’ve never heard of it either.

Amputation neuromas (traumatic neuromas) are non-neoplastic, disorganized proliferations of peripheral nerve parenchyma and stroma that form in response to amputation or traumatic injury. They are most commonly identified after tail docking in dogs or neurectomy in the distal extremities of horses. The most common clinical presentation is a young dog that continuously traumatizes its docked tail. In horses, such a lesion appears as a firm, often painful swelling at a neurectomy surgery site. Excision is curative.

Neurofibromas and neurofibrosarcomas (perineuromas, neurilemmomas, nerve sheath tumors, hemangiopericytomas, neurothekomas, schwannomas) are spindle-cell tumors that arise from the connective tissue components of the peripheral nerve. They are believed to arise from Schwann cells, but they could also arise from mesenchymal cells, which produce the nonmyelinated connective tissues that surround the myelinated nerve fiber. In dogs, forms of this tumor can be virtually indistinguishable from hemangiopericytomas and may be the same tumor.

CONCLUSION OF PRO'S ARGUMENTS:
Dog tail docking interferes with its ability to communicate with other dogs and humans, makes the dog less agile, which could save its life in a situation such as a dog chasing it, regardless of what caused the situation that is life-threatening; causes long-term and short-term pain; is usually performed to make the dog look nicer, which is unfair because it causes pain and reduces agility and communication skills; and causes tail dock neuroma, a condition which 'neuroma, or nerve tumor. This can cause pain and make your dog snappy if her tail is touched.' This is why docking a dog's tail should not be legal.
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CON cannot rebut anything I said in round 4, just as I haven't.

Vote PRO.




gonnabealawyer

Con

gonnabealawyer forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
9 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 9 records.
Posted by EAT_IT_SUKA 2 years ago
EAT_IT_SUKA
Ragnar, I realize that, but I never get any votes by putting debates in the un-voted debates forum. Maybe I should have explained that before.
Posted by Ragnar 2 years ago
Ragnar
Please cease creating other debates, to declare that you won this one and everyone should vote for you. Proving you won a debate, is what the debate itself was for.

Some tips: https://docs.google.com...
Posted by EAT_IT_SUKA 2 years ago
EAT_IT_SUKA
Ha, fair enough, connerjfield.
Posted by connorjfield 2 years ago
connorjfield
don't get me wrong I read Wikipedia all the time it can have some good info and usually can lead you to some decent sources but I wouldn't use Wikipedia itself as a source. most teachers and college professors I've found would agree.
Posted by connorjfield 2 years ago
connorjfield
you cited it, that is a source. and no it really isn't. "i'll have you know"
Posted by EAT_IT_SUKA 2 years ago
EAT_IT_SUKA
connorjfield, I didn't use Wikipedia as a source, only as a reference, as it had the definition I wanted for 'working dog' and 'docking.' I'll have you also know that Wikipedia is quite likely a reliable source as well.

http://www.livescience.com...
Posted by connorjfield 2 years ago
connorjfield
Did you seriously use Wikipedia as a source? ugh.
Posted by EAT_IT_SUKA 2 years ago
EAT_IT_SUKA
There we go. I changed the title to: 'The act of docking a non-working dog's tail should not be legal.' No worries.
Posted by EAT_IT_SUKA 2 years ago
EAT_IT_SUKA
I apologize, but the title was meant to say: 'The act of docking a non-working dog's tail should not be legal.' I apologize for that.
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by ColeTrain 2 years ago
ColeTrain
EAT_IT_SUKAgonnabealawyerTied
Agreed with before the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Agreed with after the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
Who had better conduct:-Vote Checkmark-1 point
Had better spelling and grammar:--Vote Checkmark1 point
Made more convincing arguments:Vote Checkmark--3 points
Used the most reliable sources:--Vote Checkmark2 points
Total points awarded:31 
Reasons for voting decision: Args to Pro, more well-rounded. Conduct to Con because of Pro's bad conduct (creating a debate to get votes, rather than posting in unvoted forum)