The Instigator
stealthmaster96
Pro (for)
Tied
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The Contender
darthbray
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

The death penalty should be illegal to United States citizens on a federal level

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 7/30/2013 Category: Politics
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 883 times Debate No: 36144
Debate Rounds (4)
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stealthmaster96

Pro

The first round is acceptance only.
Second and third round is initial arguments/rebutall
Last round is closing. No new ideas put in closing.
darthbray

Con

I do not agree. It doesn't matter what level you are. In America the official rule is all men are created equal. Denying that is denying the founders of our nation. It's mocking them telling them that there are men not created equal. Every man should be given justice and justice is the key to any good nation.
Debate Round No. 1
stealthmaster96

Pro

The first round is acceptance only.
Anyway, I guess for now I'll put out my ideas without a rebuttal. The United States must not seek a death penalty for criminals because it does not help with the original purpose of the prison system, it cost more on the taxpayers over time, and it above all violate the 8th amendment.

1. The original purpose of the prison system is rehabilitation and deterrence, not extermination
The true purpose of the prison system is to deter crime by sending people to criminal rehabilitation centers, or as we call it, prison. Now, we could have another debate whether the system in it of itself is a failure, but for now, lets focus on death penalty. Now, I never bought into the bull that "Texas has higher murder rates than most other states etc etc" because liberals never put population and poverty percentages in their statistics, which ultimately affect the overall rate. However, when you do put those percentages into the stats statistics, California and Texas about equal some other, smaller states like Connecticut.
Connecticut pop - 3 million
Texas pop - almost 30 million
Connecticut # of murders (2011) - 130
Texas # of murders (2011) - 1700

However, multiply those 3 million by 10, along with the murder rates, then we get, 1300 murders in Conn. alone.
You might think I helped your, case, but no. Why keep something that doesnt produce results, if it will just sit as a bump in the justice system that people result to as a result of emotional overtaking logical sentencing.

2. The price of the death penalty is TOO DAMN HIGH

California

Assessment of Costs by Judge Arthur Alarcon and Prof. Paula Mitchell (2011, updated 2012)

The authors concluded that the cost of the death penalty in California has totaled over $4 billion since 1978:

$1.94 billion--Pre-Trial and Trial Costs
$925 million--Automatic Appeals and State Habeas Corpus Petitions
$775 million--Federal Habeas Corpus Appeals
$1 billion--Costs of Incarceration
The authors calculated that, if the Governor commuted the sentences of those remaining on death row to life without parole, it would result in an immediate savings of $170 million per year, with a savings of $5 billion over the next 20 years.

Source - death penalty info. org
This is only the cream of the crop.

3. Violation of the 8th amendment

Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.

What constitutes cruel and unusual?

William Brennen states in the Gregg v Georgia dissenting opinion"
"Death is not only an unusually severe punishment, unusual in its pain, in its finality, and in its enormity, but it serves no penal purpose more effectively than a less severe punishment... The fatal constitutional infirmity in the punishment of death is that it treats 'members of the human race as nonhumans, as objects to be toyed with and discarded. [It is] thus inconsistent with the fundamental premise of the Clause that even the vilest criminal remains a human being possessed of common human dignity.' As such it is a penalty that 'subjects the individual to a fate forbidden by the principle of civilized treatment guaranteed by the [Clause].' I therefore would hold, on that ground alone, that death is today a cruel and unusual punishment prohibited by the Clause... I would set aside the death sentences imposed... as violative of the Eighth and Fourteenth Amendments."
When a person is a drug addict, specifically meth or cocaine, the veins would be much harder to locate, and if the poison is not in the bloodstream directly, the end result could be hours of pain before death.

PS: Sorry for the late response. I don't get access online until tomorrow morning. Expect a rebuttal around the same time.
darthbray

Con

darthbray forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
stealthmaster96

Pro

stealthmaster96 forfeited this round.
darthbray

Con

darthbray forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
stealthmaster96

Pro

stealthmaster96 forfeited this round.
darthbray

Con

darthbray forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
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