The Instigator
zmandebater
Pro (for)
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The Contender
DrewMcD
Con (against)
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The legal drinking age in the United States should be lowered to 18

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/24/2015 Category: Society
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 430 times Debate No: 72241
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (0)
Votes (1)

 

zmandebater

Pro

There are many countries that have instated legal age limit for drinking laws deeming the legal age for all, or some types of alcohol to be 18. At 18 people normally have less responsibilities, so drinking will not effect their day to day living any more than some one who is 21. At a younger age people will also start to slow down their drinking habits. Brain development is relatively done by 18 as well. It will also bring in more spending for businesses, and possibly causing people to get jobs at younger ages in order to pay for their booze. While alcohol is not good for you, or necessarily safe, neither is smoking, which is legal at 18. If you can fight for your country, you should be able to drink a beer.
DrewMcD

Con

Many countries have made the drinking age 18. However, multiple countries have made the legal drinking age 15. Do you support that? No? Why not? It's only a 3 year difference, Just like it's a 3 year difference between 18 and 21. Do you disagree with it because a 15 year old is less intelligent than a 18 year old therefore an 18 year old will know how to act? In that logic, a 21 year old would be smarter than an 18 year old, so the drinking age should be 21 as they would know better than an 18 year old. Besides you talked about the brain development stopping at 18, which is false. Brain development doesn't fully stop until mid 20's, and even then alcohol can have serious effects on children's and adults mental health. Saying an 18 year old has less responsibilities is also false. They have clubs, sports, college applications/visits, homework, ACT, ect. Besides, most of them have jobs already. If a person were to solely get a job for the purpose to buy alcohol, that means they most likely have a problem. That sounds like something a craving alcoholic would do. Also, I don't believe 18 year olds slow their drinking habits. If unsupervised, I believe they'll drink as much as they want. They feel like they are grown up, and they can make their own decisions, including how much they drink and when they drink it.
Debate Round No. 1
zmandebater

Pro

While not all brain development may cease at 18, major development does. The difference of effects of alcohol between a 15 year old and an 18 year vs an 18 year old and a 21 year old is going to be substantially different. This also effects more than just the brain since even less has been developed as a whole in a 15 year old than in an 18 year old. As for responsibilities, a 21 year old does have more than an 18 year old, on average. A college student has relatively the exact same things on their plate, along with the fact that this is the first time that they live away from home, having to make their own major decisions, unlike an 18 year old who is probably still in high school and has other people helping them with decisions. I am also not saying that starting to drink at 18 makes you drink slower, what I am saying is that over time people do slow down their drinking habits. If they start drinking at an earlier age then the point they start to drink slower will be sooner than if they start at 21. The getting a job to support the alcoholism was more of a quip at our economics and health behaviors.
DrewMcD

Con

While all major development may be complete, not all development will be complete. This means they will not be reaching their full potential. Also, large amounts assumed of alcohol can affect the brain processing. In a small town, you have nothing better to do than to drink and party. While 21 year old may have more responsibility, that does not mean they have as much time to drink. Since they are living on their own like you stated, they will have a ton of responsibities to take care. They'll be hammered with projects and assignments, they'll have to clean, cook, and other chores parents did for them they will now have to do. They'll have jobs so they can shop and buy necessary equipment. They'll have to fit in hobbies, like working out or video games. They'll have to have a social life, and keep in mind not all social gathering have to contain alcohol. They'll have to sleep. With all that factored in, you don't have so much time for partying and drinking without the case of
1.losing sleep
2.losing your social life
3.losing your job, therefore not being able to buy the alcohol so businesses won't have as much costumers as it potentially could have
4.failing classes and dropping out
If 18 year old have less responsibilities like you said, than they'll have more time to drink and party. With more time to party, that means alcohol will be consumed more frequently and a higher chance of each of those sessions consisting of a large consumption of alcohol, they can become physically and mentally sick.
Debate Round No. 2
zmandebater

Pro

Research shows that development continues in the brain past ones thirties. Even if it does not, you even stated yourself that development continues into the mid 20's, and the current legal drinking age is 21, which is below that. Out of pure experience, many people around the age of 21 will drink whether they are busy or not, with many social interactions ending up in inebriation. This includes college students, and those who are working full time living on their own. Many people not of age already drink as it is. With more time on their hands they also do not have to worry about alcohol effecting their life as much. As they party more by the time they get to an age of responsibility, they will be mostly partied out.

The 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey6 found that among high school students, during the past 30 days
"35% drank some amount of alcohol.
"21% binge drank.
"10% drove after drinking alcohol.
"22% rode with a driver who had been drinking alcohol.

In order to do harm to your body with alcohol a substantial amount must be consumed. The legal limit for consumption is 0.08. To reach the legal limit takes as much or more drinks than most people end up drinking anyway. Which means little to no harm is even done.
DrewMcD

Con

Okay, so it goes into thirties. You previously stated, and I quote, "Brain development is relatively done by 18 as well". Now, if I were right and it ended in mid 20's, would it be better for the starting age to be 18 like you want or 21, which is closer to the full development? Even if it does go into thirties, 21 is closer to full development, and should be legal instead of one further away from the full development. Now you said people drink before thei legal, which could be anywhere under the age of 21. With that said, why don't we legalize it at age 15 then like other countries? The kids will eventually get partied out and don't have as many responsibilites as college kids. <- That was your logic for 18 year olds. Why doesn't it apply to 15 year olds? Because of brain development like we talked about previously. If it goes into thirties like you said and we legalized it at 15, that's double of when the brain develops. 3 years added to that seems like a small amount now doesn't it? Even though I'm straight edge and am against drinking all together, I feel getting as close to full development as possible is when it should legalized, and whether it be mid 20's or thirties, 21 beats 18.
Also, here's a surgery talking about how partying and drinking in college students has DECREASED in the past decade,

The 2014 survey of over 153,000 students showed that 33.5% of college freshman reported drinking beer occasionally or frequently during their final year of high school. That was down 26.4% over the last decade, 15% over the last five years. The percentage of freshmen who drank wine or spirits fell by a similar 25.4%, over the last decade. The same students were asked how many hours they typically spent partying per week during their senior year. The percentage who said none jumped by almost 75% to 41.3%. And the percentage who spent 3 or more hours per week partying fell by 40% during the decade.
Debate Round No. 3
No comments have been posted on this debate.
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by niltiac 1 year ago
niltiac
zmandebaterDrewMcDTied
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Reasons for voting decision: I just see con's point as clearer and more logical