The Instigator
Lightning07
Pro (for)
Winning
3 Points
The Contender
PeriodicPatriot
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points

The term "funner" is an appropriate word.

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 1 vote the winner is...
Lightning07
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 12/12/2013 Category: Education
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 754 times Debate No: 42277
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (0)
Votes (1)

 

Lightning07

Pro

I wish to lay down some ground rules for this debate.
1) Since I am not making an argument in this round, the opposition has two choices. He may accept and make his points in this round. If he does so, on the final round, he shall write "This section shall be left blank as stated in the agreement" to ensure each party gets the same number of rounds. The alternative choice is that he may write "I accept" and I shall state my points in the second round.
2) Forfeiting a round will mean that said person has admitted defeat. If one has no points of argument but wishes to continue the debate, they may write "I shall leave no points of argument and allow my opponent to continue."
3) Failure to comply results in a forfeiture of the debate.
4) I wish you the best of luck
PeriodicPatriot

Con

I accept your challenge and I will state my arguments in Round 2. May the best argument win!
Debate Round No. 1
Lightning07

Pro

I humble thank you for accepting this argument. I shall lead to my points of argument.
1) Many people use the word fun as an adjective in everyday speech. While I can agree it did start as a noun, it has evolved into becoming acceptably used as an adjective. (ex. This was a fun day. OR This is a fun place to be) . Merriam-Webster Dictionary has written that the term fun is used as an adjective and has been in use as an adjective since 1846. Since fun is an adjective and it has one syllable, it should be grammatically correct that its preceding terms would "funner" and "funnest".
http://www.merriam-webster.com...
2) Many words that are very informal, and in some cases not even words, have made it into the dictionary. An example of this would be the word "whatevs". As defined in Oxford Dictionary, it is an adverb and the abbreviation of the words "what ever". I, myself, am a student right now and I see the word as much more informal than funner which if you ask anyone, will say the reason they don't use that word is because it is informal. This leads to my second point which is that the reason funner isn't accepted as a word is that it has a negative connotation of it being informal. This issue is a psychological thing. People were raised thinking that fun is a noun and can be used as a noun modifier. However, language constantly evolves but it seems that people's mentality towards it hasn't. We have words like "whatevs", "totes", "po-po", and others yet we can't accept fun as an adjective which has been used like that for over 160 years. To conclude, the reason most people don't see funner as a word is because they were raised thinking that it really wasn't. However, as said before, if "whatevs" is considered to be an official word than I think that "funner" should also be as well.
PeriodicPatriot

Con

Main Argument 1:

The term 'funner' is not appropriate, but it is not inappropriate either, It is just not grammatically correct.

Sub argument 1:

The word fun can't be comparative or superlative. In this case, you would have to add the word 'more' before the word to make it comparative, and to make it superlative, you would use 'most' before the word. The term is also informal to use in writing and speaking terms, but how you use the word is dependable. For example, if I was writing a business letter to the president or someone else important, that is considered informal and not something to use in formal writing. Instead you would use 'more fun' or 'most fun', but if I was writing a friendly letter, I could use slang in my letter because it is casual.

Examples:

A incorrect comparative sentence:
The girl is funner than the boy.
A correct comparative sentence: The girl likes to have more fun than the boy

A incorrect superlative sentence: The woman is the funnest person in the room.
A correct superlative sentence: The woman is having the most fun in the room.

Conclusion: The term 'funner' is informal and considered as slang.



Debate Round No. 2
Lightning07

Pro

Once again, I thank you for debating me. I have enjoyed it very much. Now onto my arguement...

To your sub argument of how the word fun cannot be comparative or superlative, every adjective has a comparative and superlative form. An adjective that is one syllable adds the endings -er and -est respectively. Any adjective that is more than two syllables adds more and most to the beginning respectively. Since fun is considered can be considered an adjective and it has one syllable the terms "fun" and "funner" are gramatically correct. While I agree it is slightly informal as said in last argument due to the history of the word, it is, nonetheless, gramatically correct as a word and should be appropriate for almost any use.
PeriodicPatriot

Con

Main Argument 2:

"your sub argument of how the word fun cannot be comparative or superlative, every adjective has a comparative and superlative form. An adjective that is one syllable adds the endings -er and -est respectively. Any adjective that is more than two syllables adds more and most to the beginning respectively."

Sub Argument 2:

Since you mentioned that, I have something to say. Not every one syllable word has to have -er or -est. In fact, some two or more syllable words could have -er or -est. You could find the word funner in some dictionaries, but adding more and most make sense. For example, the word popular has to have more and most. But again, saying the term depends on how you see the word. Some people might think to add more and most and others don't because they believe to saying slang than using proper language. I am not saying that you like to use slang a lot, I am just saying. You can talk like that to your friends but you can use it however you like. Contractions could be considered slang, but how you believe it is how you believe it. I like using the full meaning of the contraction rather than using the contraction itself. I am very proper and I do not talk slang. In fact, my family is very proper. My friends like using slang, but that is ok.

Conclusion: It is not how it is informal, but it is how you believe it is.


Debate Round No. 3
Lightning07

Pro

Thank you for the quick response and I'm sorry for such a long delay. Now, on with the debate.

"Not every one syllable word has to have -er or -est. In fact, some two or more syllable words could have -er or -est."
If you can show me a couple examples of EACH that is used in everyday language, especially on the "not every one syllable word has to have -er or -est" part, and I will acknowledge this point. You did not provide any examples that can validate your point.

"You could find the word funner in some dictionaries, but adding more and most make sense."
1) You have acknowledged that funner is a word thus adding to my argument.
2) I beg to differ that adding more and most makes more sense. While I can admit that it is up to personal preference, when saying funner and funnest, not only is it grammatically correct, that is how people have been saying it for many years as said in my first argument. "Merriam-Webster Dictionary has written that the term fun is used as an adjective and has been in use as an adjective since 1846."

"For example, the word popular has to have more and most."
This is because that is how you are supposed to make adjectives with two or more syllables into their comparative and superlative forms. This does not support your argument.

Since this is my final argument, I shall highlight my main points.
1) It has been used for hundreds of years. "...has been in use as an adjective since 1846"
2) It is considered a word on many dictionaries. "Merriam-Webster Dictionary has written that the term fun is used as an adjective..."
3) While slightly informal due to its history, since it is an adjective as stated above, it is still grammatically correct. "An adjective that is one syllable adds the endings -er and -est respectively."

I thank you for your time and hope to see your last debate. I wish you the best of luck and may the best person win.
PeriodicPatriot

Con

Main Argument 3:

"It has been used for hundreds of years... has been in use since 1846"

Sub Argument 3:

Since you have mentioned it, words used from hundreds of years ago might be in a grammar and word choice back then, but today is different. Some words in the Merriam- Webster dictionary might change, in other words, the text copyright might change each year. This means that the words could change each copyright. The term might have been at use back then, but now, people know the right grammar. That is why people don't say the term anymore. The popularity of the word means people use it a lot. Again, thank you for debating with you.

Conclusion: Words back then might not be used now.
Debate Round No. 4
No comments have been posted on this debate.
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by kbub 3 years ago
kbub
Lightning07PeriodicPatriotTied
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Total points awarded:30 
Reasons for voting decision: It was a great debate on both sides, but it seems to me that Pro has won the flow. Pro wins that "funner" is appropriate in informal contexts, and that the word is used very popularly, that is was used a long time ago, and that fun ought to be considered an adjective. Con did not give much analysis on why "funner" shouldn't be appropriate, but claims that it depends on the context. This admits that it is appropriate sometimes: "my friends use slang, but it is ok." Thanks for the debate!