The Instigator
hilton16
Pro (for)
Losing
7 Points
The Contender
LiamOrMail
Con (against)
Winning
12 Points

The world needs to take measure to pressure North Korea for change.

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 3 votes the winner is...
LiamOrMail
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/30/2013 Category: Politics
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,532 times Debate No: 31913
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (2)
Votes (3)

 

hilton16

Pro

The world needs to take measure to pressure North Korea for change.

Full Resolution:
The world needs to take measure to pressure North Korea for change.

BoP is shared.

Definitions:

North Korea:


The Democratic People's Republic of Korea, commonly called North Korea, is a country in East Asia, in the northern half of the Korean Peninsula.

World: In this case and in this debate all of the countries compromising of the United Nations.

Measure: A plan or course of action taken to achieve a particular purpose

Pressure: Attempt to persuade or coerce (someone) into doing something

Change: Make or become different

Areas for change: (only) nothing else than these areas should be talk about.

1. Economically
2. Politically
3. Socially
4. Militarily

Rules

1. The first round is for acceptance and appreciation. (only)
2. A forfeit or concession is not allowed.
3. No semantics, trolling, or lawyering.
4. All arguments must be visible inside this debate.
5. Debate resolution, definitions, rules, and structure cannot be changed without asking in the comments before you post your round 1 argument. Debate resolution, definitions, rules, and structure cannot be changed in the middle of the debate. All resoultion, definitions, rules, and structures are as stated.

Debate Structure

Round 1: Acceptance
Round 2: Economically (only)
Round 3: Politically (only)
Round 4. Socially (only)
Round 5: Militarily (only)
LiamOrMail

Con

I accept this challenge, and (unlike last time) I understand all terms within it.
Debate Round No. 1
hilton16

Pro

Economically
Among the comity of nations, North Korea remains at the bottom of the leader speaking in economic term. The north korean government suffer it's own people. As video of kim jong il death, a vast number of North Korean were crying. The truth-not because their communist leader die but because they were promise more food by the government if they cry.



North Korea remains one of the most saunction nation in the world by the UN. From reading this you'll see what this country faces and what it people goes through everyday.

Economy - overview: North Korea, one of the world's most centrally directed and least open economies, faces chronic economic problems. Industrial capital stock is nearly beyond repair as a result of years of underinvestment, shortages of spare parts, and poor maintenance. Large-scale military spending draws off resources needed for investment and civilian consumption. Industrial and power output have stagnated for years at a fraction of pre-1990 levels. Frequent weather-related crop failures aggravated chronic food shortages caused by on-going systemic problems, including a lack of arable land, collective farming practices, poor soil quality, insufficient fertilization, and persistent shortages of tractors and fuel. Large-scale international food aid deliveries have allowed the people of North Korea to escape widespread starvation since famine threatened in 1995, but the population continues to suffer from prolonged malnutrition and poor living conditions. Since 2002, the government has allowed private "farmers' markets" to begin selling a wider range of goods. It also permitted some private farming - on an experimental basis - in an effort to boost agricultural output. In December 2009, North Korea carried out a redenomination of its currency, capping the amount of North Korean won that could be exchanged for the new notes, and limiting the exchange to a one-week window. A concurrent crackdown on markets and foreign currency use yielded severe shortages and inflation, forcing Pyongyang to ease the restrictions by February 2010. In response to the sinking of the South Korean destroyer Cheonan and the shelling of Yeonpyeong Island, South Korea's government cut off most aid, trade, and bilateral cooperation activities, with the exception of operations at the Kaesong Industrial Complex. In 2012, KIM Jong Un's first year of leadership, the North displayed increased focus on the economy by renewing its commitment to special economic zones with China, negotiating a new payment structure to settle its $11 billion Soviet-era debt to Russia, and purportedly proposing new agricultural and industrial policies to boost domestic production. The North Korean government often highlights its goal of becoming a "strong and prosperous" nation and attracting foreign investment, a key factor for improving the overall standard of living. Nevertheless, firm political control remains the government's overriding concern, which likely will inhibit fundamental reforms of North Korea's current economic system.
LiamOrMail

Con

I have a few issues in your statement to point out. Firstly, you stated that during the grieving period of the North Korean people, they were "promised more food if they cried". Where did you get that information? I did quite extensive research during the period myself, but I never encountered that reason. It's more likely that they were upset because according to Scott Atran, a psychologist at Michigan University, "everything they have came from the Dear Leader, and they have no alternative form of reality."

My second issue with your statement which I'd like to point out: "North Korea is one of the most sanctioned nations in the world". This debate is about pressuring North Korea for change, yet you just pointed out a MAJOR reason why North Korea's economic system is at its state right now. Without the UN sanctions, North Korea would enjoy the economic freedoms of other nations, such as the United States, or members of the Commonwealth, and the economic system would most certainly improve. However, that isn't to say that the economic system isn't improving. The North Korean Famine ended in 1998, and since then, there have been economic improvements, albeit slow. Compared to other nations, however, the GDP of North Korea isn't as extreme. 18 of the 20 poorest nations on the planet (as of 2011) are in Africa, and I'm sure all of us are aware of how many charities help support the people there. For those countries, it isn't a matter of "pressuring the government to change", it's simply to assist the people in any way the charity can. But, because of sanctions and policies against the DPRK, people merely say "they can change". You don't see them saying that to the governments of Mali or @#!*% . The fact is, North Korea has operated well in it's limited situation, and only has trading in place with China. In North Korea, 63% of it's population works in industry and services, while 37% works in agriculture, a massive amount of people for a country of its size.

Obviously, pressuring the government for change simply will not work, the people have lived that way for many decades, the personality cult surrounding their "Dear Leader" exists, so sudden change will likely spark aggression, not just from the government, but from the general population. North Korea's economy has done relatively well, for a country with only one trading partner, and being one of the most homogeneous nations on the planet.

SOURCES:
http://www.time.com...
http://www.therichest.org...
http://en.wikipedia.org...
Debate Round No. 2
hilton16

Pro

Let me point out a fe thing before i go into politically.

" they were "promised more food if they cried". Where did you get that information? I did quite extensive research during the period myself, but I never encountered that reason." i heard that from my teacher.

"My second issue with your statement which I'd like to point out: "North Korea is one of the most sanctioned nations in the world"." now why do you think they are the most saunction nation in the world? is it because they do not want to change. they violate human rights. And make there people suffer. They have slave camps making people working tirelessy. They also have prision camps. Like the industry, services, and agriculture you talking about, they didn't have no choice. it wasn't there decision but the gov't.

Now onto politics.

With a vaguely democratic framework, North Korea Politics is based on a Single party system. North Korea Politics in based on the principle of Centralization and is widely considered to be a totalitarian dictatorship.
Although the Constitution prescribes the protection of human rights and democratic system ofNorth Korea Politics, in reality, the real power is concentrated within the hands on the ruling elite. The Government and the overall North Korea Politics is dominated by the Workers' Party of Korea who have been in power ever since the independence of North Korea.

Elections are an important part of the North Korea Politics but elections occur only in single-candidate races where the candidate has been selected by the WPK beforehand. Kin Il Sung , the famous North Korean leader, plays an important role in the North Korea Politics. He has been given the posthumous title of"Eternal President". This had made most analysts conclude that the North Korea Politics is based on the cult of personality.

North Korea Politics is widely known to be following a Communist Ideology but the North Korea Governmenthas altered their political line . Formerly it was Marxism - Leninism that guided North Korea Politics but now it has been replaced by the locally developed concept of Juche, or self-reliance.
North Korea Military has an important role in the North Korea Politics. Most of the social sectors are insisted to follow Military methods and adopt the Military spirit. The constitution of North Korea prescribes the line of North Korea Politics in clear words, it says, "the Democratic People's Republic of Korea shall, by carrying out a thorough cultural revolution, train all the people to be builders of socialism and communism".

The world needs to pressure North Korea to give power to the people. To have free, fair, and transparent election. They need to be pressure into reforms on political issues.

LiamOrMail

Con

Before I go onto politics, I'll point out another flaw in your counterargument. Your statement:

"now why do you think they are the most saunction nation in the world? is it because they do not want to change. they violate human rights. And make there people suffer. They have slave camps making people working tirelessy. They also have prision camps."

The sanctions the UN has imposed upon North Korea have absolutely nothing to do with what goes on domestically in North Korea. The sanctions are to restrict the economic system of North Korea, as well as the development and testing of nuclear materials. The sanctions are not involved in any other aspect of the country, other than the "protection of the international community".
My source: http://www.globalpolicy.org...

Now, I shall move onto Politics.


If the international community were to pressure the government and the people to turn the DPRK into a democratic state, the outcome would be obvious. North Korea has been operating under a "communist leader" ever since it was founded in 1948. The personality cult is extremely strong in North Korea, and the majority of the civilians of North Korea would loyally defend their "Dear Leader", no matter the cost. Since foreign information is restricted in the DPRK, the majority wouldn't understand democracy, and even if it was explained to them, it's likely that, because of years of propaganda and the personality cult, they'd prefer having a leader over making the decision themselves. International "pressure" would very likely end in war, and if not, the civilians would likely "re-elect" (for use of a better word, as re-elect implies democracy) their leader. Put simply, based off years of repetition and propaganda, democracy simply would not work, without bloodshed. The government would be weakened, which is something they clearly want to avoid. As a parallel, it's similar to suggesting for China to leave communism for democracy. It simply would not work.

Which brings me to my second point. China supports North Korea (in it's current state) for a reason. In fact, three reasons:

No war - The Korean War cost China hundreds of thousands of lives, as well as the fact that it nearly ended in a pro-American Korea (which would have been a problem for China).

No instablilty - If North Korea collapsed, China would definitely have major issues, such as refugees, loose nuclear materials, and the risk of war.

No nuclear weaponry - Although the Chinese government claims to be against the nuclear development plans in the DPRK, China would definitely prefer a stable but nuclear developed DPRK compared to an unstable but nuclear free one.

Here's a quote from a report by the Center for Strategic and International Studies, which explains why China would prefer a nuclear DPRK:

"Although the Chinese do not view North Korea’s acquisition of nuclear weapons as an existential threat to China, there are worries that a perception of a growing nuclear threat could lead South Korea, Japan, and even Taiwan to develop nuclear capabilities. North Korea’s nuclear programs and demonstrated provocations have already prompted the United States, Japan, and South Korea to strengthen defense coordination and have led Tokyo and Seoul to enhance their missile defense. These developments are judged to have had a harmful impact on China’s security environment."

North Korea would clearly receive backing from China (in it's current state, at least) which would make it ever more difficult for international pressure to actually achieve anything, other than bloodshed. China is a major country, which has a major say in the world. Without Chinese backing, the attempts at North Korean reform could quickly escalate into something more brutal.

SOURCES: http://www.washingtonpost.com...
http://csis.org...
Debate Round No. 3
hilton16

Pro

Let me point out flaws in your rebuttal because i think you're making a mistake. you state and i quote:

The sanctions the UN has imposed upon North Korea have absolutely nothing to do with what goes on domestically in North Korea. The sanctions are to restrict the economic system of North Korea, as well as the development and testing of nuclear materials. The sanctions are not involved in any other aspect of the country, other than the "protection of the international community".

-

Human rights in North Korea are heavily restricted. There is no right to free speech, and the only radio, television, and news providers that are deemed legal are those operated by the government.[1][2]It is estimated that between 150,000 and 200,000 political prisoners are detained in concentration camps, where they perform forced labour and risk summary beatings, torture and execution.[3]

Now onto Socially

Food Shortages and Famine

In March 2011 a joint UN survey estimated that over six million vulnerable persons in North Korea urgently required international food assistance to avoid famine. As estimated food shortages reached more than one million metric tons, the World Food Programme called it the worst famine in a decade, and South Korea-based NGOs and media with informants inside North Korea reported hunger-related deaths. Causes include dismal harvests resulting from floods and an extremely harsh winter; economic mismanagement of a monetary devaluation scheme in November 2009 that wiped out many peoples’ savings and heavily damaged informal food markets; and the government’s blatantly discriminatory food policies that favor the military, government officials, and other loyal groups. North Korea’s two largest food donors, the United States and South Korea, refused to provide food aid until North Korea apologizes for the sinking of the South Korean warship Cheonan and shelling of Yeonpyeong Island in 2010.

Torture and Inhumane Treatment

Testimony from escaped North Koreans indicates that individuals arrested on criminal charges often face torture by officials aiming to enforce obedience and extract bribes and information. Common forms of torture include sleep deprivation, beatings with iron rods or sticks, kicking and slapping, and enforced sitting or standing for hours. Detainees are subject to so-called pigeon torture, in which they are forced to cross their arms behind their back, are handcuffed, hung in the air tied to a pole, and beaten with a club. Guards also rape female detainees. One study done in 2010 found that 60 percent of refugee respondents who had been incarcerated witnessed a death due to beating or torture.

Executions

North Korea’s Criminal Code stipulates that the death penalty can be applied only for a small set of crimes, but these include vaguely defined offenses such as “crimes against the state” and “crimes against the people” that can be and are applied broadly. In addition, scholars and NGOs monitoring conditions in North Korea say that a December 2007 amendment to the penal code extended the death penalty to many more crimes, including non-violent offenses such as fraud and smuggling.

Forced Labor Camps

Testimony from escapees has established that persons accused of political offenses are usually sent to forced labor camps, known as gwalliso, operated by the National Security Agency.

The government practices collective punishment, sending to forced labor camps not only the offender but also his or her parents, spouse, children, and even grandchildren. These camps are notorious for abysmal living conditions and abuse, including severe food shortages, little or no medical care, lack of proper housing and clothes, mistreatment and torture by guards, and executions. Forced labor at the gwalliso often involves difficult physical labor such as mining, logging, and agricultural work, all done with rudimentary tools in dangerous and harsh conditions. Death rates in these camps are reportedly extremely high.

North Korea has never acknowledged that these camps exist, but US and South Korean officials estimate some 200,000 people may be imprisoned in them, including in camp No. 14 in Kaechun, No. 15 in Yodok, No. 16 in Hwasung, No. 22 in Hoeryung, and No. 25 in Chungjin.

Refugees and Asylum Seekers

North Korea criminalizes leaving the country without state permission. Those who leave—most often by crossing the country’s northern border into China—face harsh punishment upon repatriation, including interrogation, torture, and punishments depend on North Korean authorities’ assessments of what the returnee did while in China. Those suspected of simple commerce or other money-making schemes are usually sent to work in forced labor brigades. Others suspected of religious or political activities, including contact with South Koreans, are given lengthier terms in horrendous detention facilities or forced labor camps with chronic food and medicine shortages, harsh working conditions, and mistreatment by guards.

Hundreds of thousands of North Koreans have fled since the 1990s, and some have settled in China’s Yanbian Korean Autonomous Prefecture. Beijing categorically labels North Koreans in China “illegal” economic migrants and routinely repatriates them, despite its obligation to offer protection to refugees under both customary international law and the Refugee Convention of 1951 and its 1967 protocol, to which China is a state party.

Many North Korean women in China live with local men in de facto marriages. Even if they have lived there for years, they are not entitled to legal residence and face the risk of arrest and repatriation. Some North Korean women and girls are trafficked into marriage or prostitution in China. Many children of such unrecognized marriages are forced to live without a legal identity or access to elementary education because their parents fear that if they register the children the mother will be identified by Chinese authorities and forcibly repatriated to North Korea.

Government-Controlled Judiciary

North Korea’s judiciary is neither transparent nor independent. All personnel involved in the judiciary—including judges, prosecutors, lawyers, court clerks, and jury members—are appointed and tightly controlled by the ruling Workers’ Party of Korea. In cases designated as political crimes, suspects are not even sent through a nominal judicial process; after interrogation they are either executed or sent to a forced labor camp, often with their entire families.

Labor Rights

North Korea is one of the few nations in the world that is not a member of the International Labour Organization (ILO). The ruling Korean Workers’ Party firmly controls the only authorized trade union organization, the General Federation of Trade Unions of Korea. South Korean companies employ some 44,000 North Korean workers in the Kaesong Industrial Complex (KIC), where the law governing working conditions falls far short of international standards on freedom of association, the right to collective bargaining, and protection from gender discrimination and sexual harassment.

Freedom of Association, Information, and Movement

The government uses fear—generated mainly by threats of forced labor and public executions—to prevent dissent, and imposes harsh restrictions on freedom of information, association, assembly, and travel.

North Korea operates a vast network of informants to monitor and punish persons for subversive behavior. All media and publications are state-controlled, and unauthorized access to non-state radio or TV broadcasts is severely punished. The government periodically investigates the “political background” of its citizens to assess their loyalty to the ruling party, and forces Pyongyang residents who fail such assessments to leave the capital.



LiamOrMail

Con

Before I go onto Social...

"Human rights in North Korea are heavily restricted. There is no right to free speech, and the only radio, television, and news providers that are deemed legal are those operated by the government.[1][2]It is estimated that between 150,000 and 200,000 political prisoners are detained in concentration camps, where they perform forced labour and risk summary beatings, torture and execution.[3]"

I never stated that these things never happened. However, you are missing my point. THESE THINGS HAVE ABSOLUTELY NOTHING TO DO WITH THE SANCTIONS UPON NORTH KOREA. THE SANCTIONS RELATE TO THE ECONOMIC AND MILITARY SYSTEM OF NORTH KOREA. HUMAN RIGHTS VIOLATIONS OCCUR IN MY NATIONS OF THE WORLD, YET THEY DO NOT HAVE SANCTIONS.

Now, onto Social.



While North Korea may have human rights violations, it isn't the ONLY nation in the world that these things occur. For the world to "pressure North Korea for change", the world would also have to pressure many other countries in the world, for it to be fair for these governments. Also, I noticed you used an example of execution in North Korea. Some "free" nations use execution as a sort of punishment, so that isn't a fair example. The death penalty is legal in some states of the U.S., as well as Japan, whom are both "free" countries.

Secondly, there are still international examples of torture in Iraq and Afghanistan, perpetrated by U.S. military there. The pressure to torture there has proved so strong, that some personnel have committed suicide (such as Alyssa Peterson). "Black sites" or secret detention facilities also exist (which are run by the United States), while they're not necessarily within mainland U.S.A, they're still operated by the United States. Reports of torture and abuse also exist.

Many "free" nations are similar to North Korea in their practice of torture and other degrading treatment, while it isn't as well-known or secret as it is in the "free" countries, it still happens. For the world to pressure North Korea for change, then the world has to change their own practices first.

(NATIONS WHICH ARE REPORTED TO HAVE/HAVE HAD DETENTION FACILITIES RUN BY THE UNITED STATES:
Thailand, the Philippines, Pakistan, Afghanistan, Uzbekistan, Azerbaijan, Jordan, Egypt, Iraq,Kuwait, UAE, Saudi Arabia, Morocco, Cyprus and Cuba. In addition, individuals are suspected to be or to have been held in temporary or permanent U.S. controlled facilities in Indonesia, El Salvador, Nigeria, Equatorial Guinea, Libya, Israel, Denmark, Poland, Romania, Bulgaria, Albania, Hungary, Germany, and Scotland.)

Also, I'd appreciate it if you actually wrote your own opinions and debates, instead of just copying and pasting directly from certain sites.


SOURCES: http://en.wikipedia.org...
http://en.wikipedia.org...;
Debate Round No. 4
hilton16

Pro

Few things before i go onto Military...

I never said that you stated these things never happened. Now you're missing a few good point stated in the statement "Human rights in North Korea are heavily restricted. No right to free speech, it is estimated that between 150,000 and 200,000 political prisoners are detained in concentration camps, where they perform forced labour and risk summary beatings, torture, and execution. This is not the Nazis day when things like this happen.

Now i think you're going too far with the US, the US don't just punish people without reason like North Korea do. "Some "free" nations use execution as a sort of punishment, so that isn't a fair example. The death penalty is legal in some states of the U.S., as well as Japan, whom are both "free" countries." now that, is completely there. They are prisoners, so based on what they do will they receive a punishment such as that of death penalty. This is not to say its a good thing. But in countries like North Korea "political prionsers" are detained in concentration camps. where have you heard in the world of "political people" being put in concentration camps. And risk beatings and torture.

Torture in Iraq and Afghanistan is a different thing, you stated yourself "U.S. Military" this is not the gov't as it is with North Korea. US went to war in Iraq and Aghanistan and the only way they could get vital information is to torture these guys. Mr. Nice guy won't always work. But the North Korean gov't torture people simply because of political belief and are detained in concentration camps where they "risk summary beatings, torture and execution." This is like the Hitler days except its not one person. but the gov't

Now, onto Military.

North Korea is one of the most farious military nation in the world. It's a nation of compulsory duty, having a mandatory serrvice of ages ranging from 3-5. North korea spent such much on military than it does on its people "Social Welfare."

North Korea is a major Nuclear Warhead. It has tested 3 nuclear test in the past few years. Making organization such as that of the UN/US and other major countries to take action against North Korea. It is said that if North korea doesn't change its attitude of nuclear testing it could be an all out war against it. Nuclear testing can have an effect on the world. After North Korea done its third testing many nations were farious. Even its greatest allies, China and Russia stood against them. According to CBC say...

"Nuclear threats are not a game," Ban said at a news conference in Andorra on Tuesday. "Aggressive rhetoric and military posturing only result in counter-actions, and fuel fear and instability.

"Things must calm down, as this situation, made worse by the lack of communication, could lead down a path that nobody should want to follow."

North Korea vowed on Tuesday to restart a nuclear reactor that can make one bomb's worth of plutonium a year, escalating tensions already raised by near daily warlike threats.

North Korea is looking for war. As recent act been show, North Korea have declare a "state of war" against South Korea. And it had constantly been threatening the US of attacks in the past few years. US has warn of Nuclear Korea not being a Nuclear war state because such countries may attack without thinking. Countries where one person holds supreme power has the will to do anything without hesitation from other political players.

North Korea GDP stands at one of the lowest in the world. Instead of spending much of its money on the most important things such as Education, Social Welfare, Health, and Infrastructure, it spends a massive amount of Military to struck fears on nation.

Thank everyone for viewing this debate. And we hope we'll get your votes.

Few points to consider...

1. Torture and Inhumane Treatment
2. Execution
3. Forced Labor Camps
4.Refugees and Asylum Seekers
Government-Controlled Judiciary
5.Labor Rights
6. Highly restricted freedom

North Korea have got to change if its people should live in prosperity. Every human deserve a right to "Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Happiness" despite what country it is.

And, i am sorry. Even though i called this debate, i've been really lazy and didn't want to forfeit any round so i copy and paste. But it not to say they are not right.

Thanks to my opponent and everyone who views this debate and voted.

http://www.cnn.com...
http://www.huffingtonpost.com...
http://www.bbc.co.uk...
LiamOrMail

Con

I believe you have misinterpreted what I was trying to say. I never said those things didn't happen in North Korea. I was only saying you incorrectly linked the sanctions to the domestic issues in North Korea, as they're not related.

Secondly, the U.S. military may be the reason for the torture in the Middle East, but that doesn't include the "black site" nations of the world, where the U.S. military isn't active.

Thirdly, your statement: "where have you heard in the world of "political people" being put in concentration camps. And risk beatings and torture."I can think of a few examples right off the top of my head. One example would be Sudan. Another would be Northern Ireland.

And finally, your statement: "It's a nation of compulsory duty, having a mandatory serrvice of ages ranging from 3-5"North Korea most definitely isn't the only country of mandatory duty. South Korea also makes duty mandatory for at least 2 years. Religious groups there, such as Jehovah's Witnesses (JW's are politically neutral, and as a result, refuse to partake in anything related to the army) are put in prison for refusing to be involved in the army.

In October 2006, after the DPRK conducted a nuclear test, the United Nations' Security Council imposed sanctions against the DPRK. Backed by the United States, the UN openly condemned North Korea's nuclear program. These sanctions restricted military and technological goods within North Korea, as well as a few financial restrictions. Then, in December 2012, North Korea launched a rocket and satellite into orbit, in which the Security Council followed by tightening the sanctions already in place. Shortly thereafter, in February 2013, North Korea conducted a third nuclear test, which led to the Security Council toughening the sanctions even more so.Judging by the erratic behavior of the government of North Korea and the threats that were made since the beginning of March, (and the resulting sanctions by the Security Council), the DPRK clearly felt threatened by the US, South Korea, and the UN, to the point of declaring war on South Korea on March 29th 2013. The pressure being put on the Korean nation clearly hasn't benefited either side. Kim Jong-un is making these threats because Kim "needs to show he has the guts. The best way to do that is to use the military might that he commands," said Lee Yoon-gyu, who is a North Korea expert at Korea National Defence University in Seoul. (Quoted from BBC)So, to summarize, the world HAS been putting pressure on NK for change in their military for the past seven years, yet there's been absolutely no benefits whatsoever. These sanctions are partly to blame for the North Korean's declaration of war on South Korea, and the latest threat by North Korea of an "all out nuclear war", which, obviously, the international community wants to avoid.

SOURCES:
http://abcnews.go.com...
http://en.wikipedia.org...
As this debate draws to a close, I want to make it clear, I don't support the horrendous things which happen in North Korea. But, truth be told, North Korea isn't THE ONLY nation in which these things occur. I've pointed out many reasons on why international pressure is negative, as well as examples of countries (as well as "free" ones) which have similarities. And, at the end of the day, it's not about the debate topic, but how the opponents handle the statements of the other. Thank you for making such an interesting debate topic, which is also very time-appropriate! =)
Debate Round No. 5
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by hilton16 3 years ago
hilton16
My mistake! I thought it was the other mistake!
Posted by hilton16 3 years ago
hilton16
pls remove all votes. this debate doesn't count. the other one count so go to it. I don't want my record to mess up with this one that we didn't vote on. thank you
3 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 3 records.
Vote Placed by imabench 3 years ago
imabench
hilton16LiamOrMailTied
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Total points awarded:33 
Reasons for voting decision: pro listed dozens of reasons that warrant the world to at least pressure North Korea to change which despite con's counter arguments still were superior. Pro however often went crazy with bolding or italicizing, and there were a handful of spelling mistakes and copy-paste errors that were quite noticeable. Arguments to the pro but sources and s/g to the con, good debate
Vote Placed by masterchief12 3 years ago
masterchief12
hilton16LiamOrMailTied
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Total points awarded:43 
Reasons for voting decision: If we did that they would have all the more reason to blow us all to hell.
Vote Placed by eastcoastsamuel 3 years ago
eastcoastsamuel
hilton16LiamOrMailTied
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Total points awarded:06 
Reasons for voting decision: Pro did nothing but copy-paste sources and frequently misunderstood the rebuttals laid out by Con. Con was able to use effective rebuttals and sources that were convincing and adequately dismissed Pro. Con wins.