The Instigator
NBhat
Pro (for)
Winning
9 Points
The Contender
Frostblade
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points

There is a historical lack of interest in African music among American and European music scholars.

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 2 votes the winner is...
NBhat
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 7/23/2014 Category: Music
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 654 times Debate No: 59449
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (1)
Votes (2)

 

NBhat

Pro

Hello,

For my first debate I will be arguing the following statement: There has been historical lack of interest in African music among American and European music scholars.
I will be arguing the pro side of this.
The BOP is shared.
The first round will be acceptance.
The second will be an explanation of why each side feels this way.
The third round will be a rebuttal.
The fourth and final round can introduce new ideas, rebut the retbuttal and have closing remarks.

Good Luck,
NBhat
Frostblade

Con

I accept the position of (con)
Debate Round No. 1
NBhat

Pro

First, I'd like to thank my opponent for accepting this challenge.

To start with, I'd like to point out that when one observes the primary scholars of African Music one mainly finds these scholars to be of African descent. They include Hugh Tracy of South Africa, Nketia of Ghana, Mngoma of South Africa, Maraire of Zimbabwe and Makabuya of Uganda. One is quite hard pressed to find any American or European scholars of this type of music. The field is almost completely dominated by those who have resided mainly within Africa. Throughout history this has been the case. Ruth M. Stone, in her book Africa (Garland Encyclopedia of World Music, Volume 1) states, "as Europeans began to study Africa, and in particular its music, their interpretations emphasized a music that was rather monotonous, static and inactive". She then says that this misconception came from the Europeans' lack of appreciation of African Music's subtleties. If those Europeans instead chose to educate themselves on the subtleties of this music, they wouldn't have had the impression that African music was as dull as they had believed. As Impey Angela points out in the same book, "...within a socio-cultural context...the music of Africa can be seen as dynamic." Along with that African music has not been analyzed properly through the lens of Europeans or American scholars. The Western scholar has set views on analyzing music. Usually this is through a song's rhythm and harmony. Unlike the 7 tone scale of Western music, African music encompasses a wide range of different scales. Not only that, but unlike the simple, stately rhythm of Western music African music contains several different rhythmic subdivisions simultaneously. Due to the complexity of African music Western scholars have left it alone.

Thank you for your time,
NBhat
Frostblade

Con

I would like to thank the instigator for accepting me.

Although there is a lack of interest in African music, it is hardly historic.
It is no secret that a culture will puts it's music before other cultures. It is also true that a controlled area were two cultures collide ends up with cultural diffusion. Such as the Romans and the Greeks. The Romans began to copy Greek music, architecture.

Western civilization had a strong influence, especially in the of Africa, were Britain controlled many areas. There was a great fight as the Germans and British vied for Mastery of the North African shores. Taking towns over for strategic advantage.

There are also some colonies that were in Africa that became countries such as South Africa. It still very much copies a good amount of western culture.

As far as a historical lack, the study of African tribal music can be linked to the study of Native American music. They both do not have many scholars outside of their ancestry. So their isn't a historical lack.

While there is some
Debate Round No. 2
NBhat

Pro

My opponent starts his argument of saying that the lack of interest in African music is evident, however it is not historic. However, according to the Merriam-Webster dictionary the word 'historic' means something that is "known or established in the past". Ruth Stone documented this lack of interest in her book Africa (Garland Encyclopedia of World Music, Volume 1). This book was written in 1997 so it would make sense that she had begun her studies to reach these findings at least some time prior to that. One can quite easily understand that 1997 was 17 years ago. Ergo, 1997 was in the past. When one realizes this, one can state that this lack of interest is historic because it was both known and established in the past.

My opponent then goes on to say "It is no secret that a culture will put its music before other cultures," However this does not serve to explain the almost complete lack of American or European scholars of African Music. Even though there are American and European scholars of other types of music there are very few, if not none, for African Music. Richard Wolf, for example, is a professor at Harvard mainly devoted to Indian Classical music.

My opponent also mentions that Western civilization had a strong influence in Africa and then gives examples of this. However he fails to explain how this relates to the debate topic. The debate is not about the cultural impact of western civilization on Africa, instead it is about African music.

My opponent also says that the study of African music can be linked to the study of Native American music due to the fact that he claims that both don't have scholars outside their ancestry. However this is not the case. One can look to Joyce Szabo an art historian specializing in Native American art and music. Joyce Szabo is not of Native American ancestry.
Frostblade

Con

Frostblade forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
NBhat

Pro

I have already rebutted all of my opponent's arguments last round and he has not brought any new ideas forward. This leaves me with nothing to do except give my closing remarks. It was a good first debate for me and I gained a lot of experience. Everything that I needed to say about this topic has been fully explained in the preceding rounds. Thank you Frostblade for participating in this debate.
Frostblade

Con

Frostblade forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by Jrmar463 2 years ago
Jrmar463
To be brutally honest I would have to say it's a long held grudge by parties that were slavers. African culture and history is so rich, but media is what fuels our society now. And media is controlled by those that would see slavery put back into action.
2 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Vote Placed by superbowl9 2 years ago
superbowl9
NBhatFrostbladeTied
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Reasons for voting decision: FF
Vote Placed by lannan13 2 years ago
lannan13
NBhatFrostbladeTied
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Reasons for voting decision: Forfeiture