The Instigator
Nayrb
Pro (for)
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0 Points
The Contender
Controverter
Con (against)
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0 Points

Tonality is a natural Force Like Gravity

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 3/23/2013 Category: Arts
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,098 times Debate No: 31581
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (1)
Votes (0)

 

Nayrb

Pro

"Tonality is a natural force like gravity." Paul Hindemith.

I agree. Great composers such as Stravinsky might stretch tonality to neo-tonality. Jazz players from Miles Davis to Coltrane play outside notes/scales. However, atonality/12 tone scale works are a purely academic concept. It is unnatural and I argue unmusical. It could be art.

I am not arguing for strict adherence to western harmony traditions but if you study globally, you will see that all cultures have tonality in their music.

I am all for dissonance but it has to be tuned in by a great composer and not tuned out by an academic.
Controverter

Con

A natural force is in fact not even a force as gravity is in fact represented as an acceleration rate, on Earth, of 9.81 ms^-2

Gravity is a mystical power that even the most advanced physicists haven't got anywhere near finding the origins of.

Tonality is a system/language of music in which specific hierarchical pitch relationships are based on a key"center", or tonic, that is, on hierarchical scale degree relationships. http://en.wikipedia.org...

So I leave it up to my opponent to explain how a distinguished 'language' of pitch can be synonymous to an unidentifiable mystery as is gravity.
Debate Round No. 1
Nayrb

Pro

"Tonality is a natural force like gravity." Paul Hindemith.

I agree. Great composers such as Stravinsky might stretch tonality to neo-tonality. Jazz players from Miles Davis to Coltrane play outside notes/scales. However, atonality/12 tone scale works are a purely academic concept. It is unnatural and I argue unmusical. It could be art.

I am not arguing for strict adherence to western harmony traditions but if you study globally, you will see that all cultures have tonality in their music.

I am all for dissonance but it has to be tuned in by a great composer and not tuned out by an academic.

Science has limitations. Explaining 'consciousness' to explaining 'gravity' to explaining the 'subjectivity of the colour red.' I am not arguing the strength of science.

I am arguing about - brute facts - objects fall and notes/intervals have tendencies to resolve. Both are entwined with the physical world. Science come afterward explaing how we are conscious, how there is gravity and why the universally the ear listens for 'tonality'. It is this aspect of the ear's innate anticipation that composers work with to create music.

Music is ultimately a combination of the composer's ability to be aware of these tonal limitations and yet use their ear/consisouness to create unique expression. Much like a surfer. The composer dances upon a wave that was given not one which they created.

12 tone is a step outside of the natural tensions.

12 tone is a form of art but I argue not a musical one. Like a surfer captured as a sculpture. The movement is gone; the dance is gone.

We have turned the subject into an object and in doing so have lost the subject.
Controverter

Con

While a nice history of tonality was displayed I saw no correlation made between gravity and tonality.

Just because we cannot explain what gravity is doesn't make it able to suddenly be tonality.

Tonality is an identifiable technique of forming a piece with a nice flow of notes and tones rather than in a staccato style.
Debate Round No. 2
Nayrb

Pro

Nayrb forfeited this round.
Controverter

Con

Moving swiftly on...
Debate Round No. 3
Nayrb

Pro

Nayrb forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
Nayrb

Pro

Nayrb forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by Nimbus328 3 years ago
Nimbus328
Tonality is based on vibrations, one octave sounds like the one above it due to doubling the number of vibrations per second.
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