The Instigator
GregM08
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
dude234
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

US High School Students Should be Required to Pass Civics Test to Graduate

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 2/15/2016 Category: Education
Updated: 12 months ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 270 times Debate No: 86598
Debate Rounds (3)
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GregM08

Pro

Recent data suggests that 2/3 of Americans don't know there are three branches of government. The survival of our democracy requires an informed and engaged electorate and a basic understanding of civics is necessary to that survival.

Currently, there is legislation being proposed in various states to require high school students to pass the same civics test given to those applying for U.S. Citizenship. Our educational institutions are the great equalizer of knowledge and information distribution, therefore they are a perfect place to both teach basic civics and assure every citizen has a basic comprehension of how the government functions.
dude234

Con

There may be high school students that are not looking to be involved with voting or anything to do with the Civics part of the world and there also may be students who are weak and keep failing the class and just because of civics they cant get into a top college.
Debate Round No. 1
GregM08

Pro

GregM08 forfeited this round.
dude234

Con

dude234 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
GregM08

Pro

On your first point, "high school students that are not looking to be involved with...civics," it is clear that many students will not have interest in biology or chemistry as an occupation or hobby, but understanding basic sciences is essential to promoting the advancement of our society and therefore is required for graduation.

To your second point, about failing a course or test, there is a an accepted premise that standards of education need to be met in order to graduate and compete for prestigious colleges, regardless of the specific area being tested.

It seems to me that at the heart of your arguments is the inherent value of a civics education to the individual student and broader society. To that I would argue the correlation between higher civics knowledge and higher engagement with community/active civics in the local, state, and national government. And the more engagement the better: the more representative the goverment, the more responcive power is to the ordinary citizen, the more just and fair the economic/social scheme, the healthier the society. And above the casual interest of a student in civics or their desire for higher education, the health of the broader democracy and society has far more value.
dude234

Con

dude234 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
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