The Instigator
annacush
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Tyler5362
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points

USA Education Grade Inflation

Do you like this debate?NoYes+0
Add this debate to Google Add this debate to Delicious Add this debate to FaceBook Add this debate to Digg  
Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 0 votes the winner is...
It's a Tie!
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 4/23/2014 Category: Education
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 498 times Debate No: 53207
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (1)
Votes (0)

 

annacush

Con

In America, more than 40 percent of students in high-level education institutions receive grades in the A range. Overtime the average GPA of students has increased. Have A's lost value over time? Do students deserve the grades they receive or do students need to work less and less to obtain A's? How can students be accurately evaluated based on their abilities and intelligence if grades are "capped" at an A+? Are there anyways to go about fixing this situation? Should grades be "uncapped" similar to the inflation of common products such as homes, cars, or bread?
Tyler5362

Pro

First, I want to say that I accept the challenge.

Now that I have done that; let's get started.

My Argument:
I would have to disagree with you. Have you ever thought that maybe kids just want to succeed? Therefore, they are getting better grades than in previous years and they work hard for those grades? This system of A, B, C, D, E (or F wherever you live) is something that gives a kid the desire to do better if that kid receives anything with a C or lower. If a kid gets an A; he or she get a sense of accomplishment which would give them an enhanced desire to do better. I think it is a perfect system.
Debate Round No. 1
annacush

Con

I do agree that students are more motivated today than they were 20 or 30 years ago. However, with little leeway between grades, it is not fair for the top student to receive an A+ and for all close competitors to receive A+'s or A's. In this instance, it is difficult to distinguish between the two.

Take the example of a curved test score. In Class A there is a student who get a 100. There would be no curve. The highest score in Class B (let's say it's the same subject and teacher just different periods) is an 80. There's a curve. How is it fair to students of Class A? It is not at all. Students of Class A who received an 80 knew the same amount of information as the student in Class B, but the two of them will receive different grades.

Curves aren't exactly the same as grade inflation, but they effect one another.
Tyler5362

Pro

That may be true that they aren't the same but effect each-other.

Look at this way. The student that received an 80 in class A might have known different portions that of the student in Class B who ALSO received an 80. It all depends on what they know. The questions that they got right might be completely or closely different than that of the student in Class A. It, basically, is all based on what THEY know.
Debate Round No. 2
annacush

Con

annacush forfeited this round.
Tyler5362

Pro

Con has forfeited the last round. I extend my arguments.
Debate Round No. 3
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by Tyler5362 3 years ago
Tyler5362
Note how my opponent hasn't posted an argument for 21 hours. Did Con give up?
No votes have been placed for this debate.