The Instigator
DudeHouse
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Brainpower
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

Using ice to reduce swelling caused by an injury is bad for you.

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 11/23/2014 Category: Health
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 520 times Debate No: 65684
Debate Rounds (5)
Comments (6)
Votes (0)

 

DudeHouse

Pro

Using ice to reduce swelling caused by an injury is bad for you. The region around the injured part of your body swells in order to send extra blood and healing fluids in order to promote faster healing in that region. Putting ice on that region immediately after an injury reduces the amount of blood and healing fluids that get to the injury and therefore slow the healing process.
Brainpower

Con

Thank you for changing the criteria!
I would like to begin this debate by saying that you are pretty accurate in the statement you made, however, the reason swelling is bad for a person is because the body reacts excessively. Swelling should prevent damage, and send blood to the injured area, however, prolonged inflammation can lead to atrophy in muscles (muscle atrophy-the wasting away of a muscle). Inflammations cause pain and make it difficult to move the affected area, however, this is not always a good thing. The lack of movement weakens the muscle, leading to atrophy. Not only this, but if left untreated, the inflammation could become chronic, which causes tissues to become rigid, making the tissue easier to damage as it fails to serve its function efficiently- for example, swelling in the knee for a prolonged period of time means that one's knee could become weak and more susceptible to damage, which is why swelling needs to be dealt with.

Swelling itself protects a muscle by causing pain when it is used and by sending blood and white blood cells, however, it causes more pressure to build up on nerves and compressed nerves hurt a lot. They can cause spasms and bunching of the muscles- the affected joint could lock up.

To clear up a point, swelling has no effect, but shows that other things are happening- it is caused by the rush of blood and effusions. Swelling is also causes oedema, and it is important to treat this with ice- oedema is the build up of fluid collecting in a tissue or cavity within the body. This article covers these points in more depth: http://www.nationwidechildrens.org....

It would be more correct of you to say that "Ice should not be overused to treat swelling" which would be correct, as it would prevent blood flow too.
Debate Round No. 1
DudeHouse

Pro

The body"s natural response to an injury is to increase the blood flow and healing fluids to the injured area. The pain associated with swelling is due to the increased fluid in the area pressing on pain receptors. Icing is good for pain reduction, but it doesn"t help the healing process. See the excerpt below.

"As Mr. Reinl points out, "Yes, (making something numb is good) if the short-term goal is pain control and the prevention of the body"s normal cellular and vascular response to injury.""

http://www.mobilitywod.com...

"".however, prolonged inflammation can lead to atrophy in muscles"."

Here you say the inflammation causes atrophy in muscles. Some injuries are more severe than others, and therefore swelling lasts for varying lengths of time. How long must the swelling occur to cause atrophy muscles? Also, is this atrophy permanent?

"To clear up a point, swelling has no effect, but shows that other things are happening- it is caused by the rush of blood and effusions. Swelling is also causes oedema, and it is important to treat this with ice- oedema is the build up of fluid collecting in a tissue or cavity within the body."

Here you say swelling has no effect, but then you say swelling causes an oedema. How can swelling both cause an oedema, and have no effect?

One thing we have to answer with this debate is:
Is swelling the body"s natural healing response to an injury? Or, is swelling detrimental to the body, and modern science has helped us heal better than we can naturally? I think this is the ultimate question we"re trying to answer. Do you agree?
Brainpower

Con

Brainpower forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
DudeHouse

Pro

This is what i get for changing my criteria so a 15 year could accept my debate.
Brainpower

Con

Brainpower forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
DudeHouse

Pro

Chicky to the cha cha!
Wicky to the wah wah!
Hicky mickey ha ha!
I'm a make ya blah blah!
Brainpower

Con

Brainpower forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
DudeHouse

Pro

DudeHouse forfeited this round.
Brainpower

Con

Brainpower forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 5
6 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 6 records.
Posted by DudeHouse 2 years ago
DudeHouse
"I apologise for the forfeit"

You're not really apologizing. You don't call someone ignorant when you apologize to them.
Posted by Brainpower 2 years ago
Brainpower
I apologise for the forfeit, but I had a technical issue of moving house and waiting for new internet- not high on my parents priorities- your ad-hominem attack is really rather ignorant- I would have liked to debate, but now I have a totally different view of you as a person, and I'm sure that you would not be so nice in any future meetings.
Posted by DudeHouse 2 years ago
DudeHouse
Changed. Bring it on!
Posted by DudeHouse 2 years ago
DudeHouse
Changed. Bring it on!
Posted by Mister_Man 2 years ago
Mister_Man
I really want to accept but am pretty busy right now, so I guess good luck to whoever does.
Posted by Brainpower 2 years ago
Brainpower
Please change your criteria for entering this debate, as I would love to argue this one!
No votes have been placed for this debate.