The Instigator
Kove_Ducote
Pro (for)
Winning
9 Points
The Contender
akaRay
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points

Video Games are Sports

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 3 votes the winner is...
Kove_Ducote
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 9/22/2016 Category: Games
Updated: 8 months ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 570 times Debate No: 95563
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (2)
Votes (3)

 

Kove_Ducote

Pro

It is a controversial topic that sparks feuds from both sides of the coin; are video games really sports? However, many fail to note a plethora of points and concepts that more than confirm the idea that video games sports.

The definition of sports, although varying with different diction and colloquialism across many textbooks, is "a game played either as recreation or competition." The argument is not semantics. Just as you can hunt game for sport, you can play video games as a sport. Whether it is physically taxing or not is irrelevant - as an example, the game of chess is widely accepted as a sport, but the game is a battle of not physical, but mental stamina. Those who play the game are indeed "athletes" - just not physical athletes - these video game athletes are playing sports.

Video games have been gradually becoming accepted as sports, making appearances on sports channels and news worldwide. The professional scene in what is now being referred to as "eSports" is no joke - the prize pools for games such as Dota 2 or Halo 5: Guardians have been large, from a wallet-pleasing two million USD to a bank-crushing twenty million USD. These prizes compete with what many professional baseball or basketball players can make in a year; to say that these eSports cannot qualify as "true sports" is ludicrous.

All around the world, there are many arguing for or against the idea that video games are sports. Only one side is correct. Due to the nature of video games, their current professional standings, and the definition of what a sport really is, it is factual that video games are a sport.

Information on eSports prize pools: http://www.esportsearnings.com...
Information on physical sport salaries: https://en.wikipedia.org...
akaRay

Con

Thank you for setting up this debate, I accept to argue that video games are not sports, that eSports are seperate from physical sports.

Your definition of sport leaves out the bit about physical exertion that is prevalent in just about every online definition I've ever read, from Google to Merriam Webster to Dictionary.com. The definition of the noun "sport" according to Dictionary.com is:

"an athletic activity requiring skill or physical prowess and often of acompetitive nature, as racing,
baseball, tennis, golf, bowling, wrestling, boxing, hunting, fishing, etc."

The key word here is, of course, athletic. Video games are not an athletic activity, no matter how quickly you can move your fingers. You said in your argument that professional gamers are athletes but not physical athletes, and if we take a look at the definition of "athlete":

Merriam Webster:

"a person who is trained or skilled in exercises, sports, or games requiring physical strength, agility, or stamina"
Debate Round No. 1
Kove_Ducote

Pro

Thank you for the humble response.

I have checked your sources, and the definition that you provided for "sport" is definitely there. However, you should also put your eyes on the other definitions which also fit the criteria of video games. A second note on this, too, is that textbook definitions are dynamic.. Even if a dictionary's first entry says "physical," I'm sure that it is subject to change, because there are too many other factors telling us that eSports are definitely "sports."

You say that prize pools don't contribute to the idea of eSports being physical sports. This was not my intention; I know that video games are not especially physical! However, the prize pool certainly attests to eSports being "true sports," such as your example of chess, which I will address soon. The reason that the money involved backs up the idea that they are sports is because it provides an example of how competitive they have become. It shows us that they are skill-based games that are taken very seriously at a professional level; thus, they are "sports." You may disagree with me due to your beliefs on the meaning of "sports," but it's at that point that it becomes semantics.

You say that eSports appear on a separate category, and you are correct, as they are not physical sports. They are indeed a subcategory, but they are still sports, hence e"Sports." They are shown on ESPN because they are sports - after all, you said it yourself; they are a sports news source. It's an example of how close society is coming to accepting them as full-fledged "sports," not just a subcategory; it's all for very good reason.

Your quote from the London Chess Conference is very interesting. However, I argue that video games are very similar. While not always as intense (it depends on the game and importance of the specific match in question), physical readiness is always a factor in mental capability, and video games is no different in how it is required. It's all physiology, and it is very important. You also say that chess has been recognized as a sport by the International Olympic Committee since 2000, but that is irrelevant to your point. One day, video games could receive the same recognition - it may sound far-fetched to you, but it is quite plausible in retrospect.

To summarize; the textbook definition of sport is dynamic and biased towards previous beliefs (those beliefs being that video games are not a sport, which is why the physical part was clarified in the first place), the prize pool of eSports serves as an example to how competitive it really is, and video games do in fact also require some form of physical preparation and readiness.
akaRay

Con

After reading your argument, I conclude that it's incredibly solid.

I concede that at some point, video games will be considered sports at the same level of competitive physical sports. At the moment, eSports is not widely regarded as a sport outside of the eSports community (I'd personally have no problem with it being accepted as a real sport, but that has no bearing on the argument), as the president of ESPN said that video games are a competition rather than a sport, and Colin Cowherd publicly voiced his disdain for competitive gaming at the professional level on his show, The Herd (although it may be worth noting that these men were born in the 1950s and 60s respectively).

Thanks to pro for showing me the reasons why you think the way you do, you have officially swayed me.

I concede. When this debate reaches the voting period, I ask all viewers to vote pro.
Debate Round No. 2
Kove_Ducote

Pro

Thank you for the interesting debate! Perhaps we will go against each other again over a different topic in the future!
akaRay

Con

Thank you for extending my knowledge on this topic.

Vote Pro, everyone.
Debate Round No. 3
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by Greg_L 8 months ago
Greg_L
Do you think the word sports was defined before or after eSports was a thing? Stop trying to argue that the definition is still 100% valid and the only true definition.
Posted by PowerPikachu21 8 months ago
PowerPikachu21
Sports as in competitive, yes. Sports as in a physical activity, no (Though some games are simulations of real sports, such as Mario Sports games).
3 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 3 records.
Vote Placed by datGUUYY 7 months ago
datGUUYY
Kove_DucoteakaRayTied
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Total points awarded:30 
Reasons for voting decision: From what I saw, neither side violated conduct or grammar rules. They both used sources relevant to the argument. I would say Pro made the most convincing argument, mostly because Con conceded. Not to mention, one of the main winning points was related to physical fitness as it relates to mental fitness. I have never seen a fat Esports player.
Vote Placed by Blazzered 7 months ago
Blazzered
Kove_DucoteakaRayTied
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Reasons for voting decision: In the end, Con concede the debate.
Vote Placed by fire_wings 7 months ago
fire_wings
Kove_DucoteakaRayTied
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Reasons for voting decision: Con concedes (I almost forgot the spelling of "concede" XD)