The Instigator
Sam7411
Con (against)
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The Contender
Nytem
Pro (for)
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Was the Catholic Church against science?

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 12/5/2015 Category: Religion
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 279 times Debate No: 83510
Debate Rounds (4)
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Sam7411

Con

I find this argument very important since I believe that it is a common misconception to believe that the Catholic Church was against science and tried to stop it, especially during the Reniassance. I would like a good informal with anyone about this.

Just some rules:

1st Round: Acceptance and Main Idea
2nd Round: Main Argument
3rd Round: Counter Argument
4th Round: Conclusion

I'm looking forward to a clean and insightful debate...
Nytem

Pro

I'm going to say they were to an extent. They allowed it usually as long as it fit into their agenda- IF something disproved something the catholic church said back then, they would be branded as heretics. Just take a look at Galileo, tried by the inquisition for publishing "Dialogue Concerning the Two Chief World Systems", which followed the Copernican system rather than the Ptolemaic system, the latter of which the church agreed with. I'm not saying they were COMPLETELY against it, but they were against science that disproved their ideology at the time.
Debate Round No. 1
Sam7411

Con

-I appreciate your balanced view. Sorry for the late response, I have to complete an unexpected research paper as well, so I will MOVE THE REBUTTAL to the final round to provide more time...

Being a fan of history and also a Catholic believer myself, I commonly come across textbooks and encyclopedias and whatnot detailing how the Catholic Church was against science. Many people today tend to associate ignorance with religion, however, the Church was instrumental in modernizing the Western World, and many believers and the Church support science. Let's take a look back in history to understand the basics ...

The Catholic had its roots, as well as most major religions, from a prophet or collection of believers. They spread the word of their religion through missionaries, who walked across regions of the earth to proclaim their word. In addition to spreading their belief, the missionaries also spread new ideas and thoughts from people to people, giving them greater knowledge of the world and the nature around them. In this way, they essentially helped to jump start science. For example, later, missionaries of the Spanish brought new ways of thinking to the American Indians, and in turn learned from their own knowledge of nature.

However this is merely spreading ideas, not supporting science, but the Missionaries, monks and priests did more. The Monasteries of the Middle Ages were the center of science. The inhabitants provided medical care and treatment to the ill. In order for them to succeed, they had to find new ways to treat the sick Monks studied different types of herbs for the best cure, taking a methodical approach.

Obviously, this was not the only way the Catholic Church used science.
Roger Bacon, a philosopher and a Franciscan monk, can be considered the "father" of the scientific method, or experimental science. He studied astronomy, mathematics, optics, languages, and yes, alchemy. He wrote many books exploring nature and questioned old superstition.
St. Albert the Great was a German friar who studied biology, chemistry, physics, astronomy, geography, and mathematics, and taught at the university of Paris.
Christopher Clavius was a German mathematician and astronomer as well as a Jesuit, who modified the Gregorian calendar and was a leading author.
The Jesuits are a congregation of priests and monks were are widely regarded for their work in education and theology

These are just brief example of Catholic believers that have supported and spread science...

In addition I would like to prove the myth that the Catholic Church was against Galileo.
Nicolas Copernicus actually found support from some monks of the Catholic Church and allowed his ideas to spread, funding and printing his theories.
Galileo had two major problems: who couldn't prove his theory at the time, and his personality.
He simply could not prove the shifts of the planets and stars, and how they could move, with his basic technology. Even so, he saw support from Pope V. Unfortunately, he put himself at odds with the Church. He wrote many insulting and disparaging letters to the cardinals and the Pope, and he wrote books attacking and mocking their way of thought. This is what caused his trial. Still, three out of the ten cardinals refused to sign the verdict condemning the scientist.
Nytem

Pro

Nytem forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
Sam7411

Con

Sam7411 forfeited this round.
Nytem

Pro

Nytem forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
Sam7411

Con

Sam7411 forfeited this round.
Nytem

Pro

Nytem forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
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