The Instigator
Jonathan11
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
Lazy_Lipids
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points

Water is a human right and therefore cannot be owned, sold, bartered or traded

Do you like this debate?NoYes+0
Add this debate to Google Add this debate to Delicious Add this debate to FaceBook Add this debate to Digg  
Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 0 votes the winner is...
It's a Tie!
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 10/8/2013 Category: Politics
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 795 times Debate No: 38651
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (0)
Votes (0)

 

Jonathan11

Con

First round to accept
Lazy_Lipids

Pro

I am Lazy, but I still accept the debate!
Debate Round No. 1
Jonathan11

Con

Now my first argument is if who ever owns the water (example government) can sell the resource to industries such as agriculture, oil and gas companies. Agriculture is a renewable profitable industry and oil and gas is an industry that our economy relies on. Currently 1 and 14 jobs are directly or indirectly involved in the oil and gas industry.

My second point is water is getting more valuable then ever, and since Canada and the U.S own about 15% of the worlds drinkable water, they could sell to the highest bidder and make a huge profit.
Lazy_Lipids

Pro

Hello, to everyone who reads this and to my worthy opponent.

Well, I completely agree that water is a human right and cannot be owned sold or bartered. To assure you guys, water is actually free. Nobody stops you from drinking water from the ponds or rivers. If anyone does that you can shut them up by shouting it out that water is a gift of god and not your property.

For instance the rural India, everybody pumps up water from the underground aquifer " mostly to irrigate the fields; but the same water is also used for daily needs like bathing, drinking etc.

The water one gets in the drinking bottles is also free, what the companies charge for is the plastic used in making the bottle, the cost of molding a bottle and that of purifying the water and adding essential minerals.
THANK YOU!
Debate Round No. 2
Jonathan11

Con

Jonathan11 forfeited this round.
Lazy_Lipids

Pro

In her book Water Wars, the Indian author Vandana Shiva lists nine principles underpinning water democracy. At least two of these principles are directly compromised by the privatization of water. Point number four states that "Water must be free for sustenance needs.

Since nature gives water to us free of cost, buying and selling it for profit violates our inherent right to nature's gift and denies the poor of their human rights." When private companies try to make large profits through high water prices, it denies the poor the inalienable right to the most necessary substance for life. In accordance with this fact, point number seven states, "Water is a commons. . . It cannot be owned as private property and sold as a commodity."

How can one justify claiming water as their own through contractual agreement while letting another human being go thirsty? Water is a commons because it is the basis of all life. Water rights are natural rights and thus are usufructuary rights, meaning that water can be used, but not owned. As far fetched as water ownership may seem, it is happening at an increasing rate around the globe.

I, for one, would not want to live where such an important life necessity becomes market-driven -- to increase corporate profits -- and is available only to those who can afford to pay. It is the state's function to allocate water in the broadest public interest.
Debate Round No. 3
No comments have been posted on this debate.
No votes have been placed for this debate.