The Instigator
Cassie412
Pro (for)
Winning
4 Points
The Contender
TheDebateMaster1
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points

What is the best book?

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 1 vote the winner is...
Cassie412
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 8/5/2014 Category: Entertainment
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,725 times Debate No: 59803
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (22)
Votes (1)

 

Cassie412

Pro

This debate is not meant to be serious. I would just like my opponent to argue for what they think is the best-written book they know. Please no religious texts, and just fiction.
My claim (pro): Watership Down, by Richard Adams.
Rules: no personal attacks. It would also help if I read my opponent's favorite book before round 2, and vice versa. Finally, the books must not be part of a series.
Thanks, and may the best book win!
(Re-issuing, due to lack of reply from Con. Opponents, anyone?)
TheDebateMaster1

Con

My claim (con): The Jade Boy, by Cate Clain
Debate Round No. 1
Cassie412

Pro

I have never read The Jade Boy, and have not had the opportunity to get to a library lately, so this first argument of mine will focus mainly on why Watership Down is wonderfully unique in the spectrum of books.
First, Watership Down has unlikely main characters that distinguish it from other "classics." The primary characters in Watership Down are rabbits. This may bring to mind images of fluffy tails and nibbling carrots, but author Richard Adams develops the characters so deeply and with such seriousness that any thought of this being a lighthearted fantasy is swept away with the first few chapters.

Next are Watership Down's masterfully executed plots, both major and minor. The main story revolves around the struggles of a group of rabbits as they abandon their home warren after Fiver, a rabbit with the gift of prophecy, foretells coming doom. (This is later revealed to be the bulldozing of the plot of land on which they reside.) The rabbits seeks a place of safety, and after many harrowing trials, reach a figurative promised land known as Watership Down. However, because there are no females in the group, the rabbits are forced to ask a nearby warren for does or face extinction. In this part of the book, the most fascinating character is introduced: General Woundwort, the tyrannical dictator of the Warren Efrafa, in which he enforces an unyielding totalitarian regime. Only with unrelenting determination, a brilliant trick, and an unlikely alliance will the rabbits free the does and bring peace to the warren.
And this is only the main plot! The author also weaves in various stories from rabbit folklore, featuring the Robin Hood-esque rabbit El-ahrairah (the Prince With a Thousand Enemies) and his second-in-command Rabscuttle. This is not to mention the underlying metaphors of Odysseus on his journey and other historical expeditions.

Finally, I would like to extol the quality of the beautiful language in Watership Down. It is descriptive without being flowery, humorous without being cliche, and consistently makes the plot flow with no dull spots. Below are passages which I have found to be the most powerful:
(The rabbit Fiver, speaking about a warren that is not what it seems) "I tell you, every single thing that's happened fits like a bee in a foxglove. And kill them, you say, and help ourselves to the great burrow? We shall help ourselves to a roof of bones, hung with shining wires! Help ourselves to misery and death!"
(The rabbit sun god Frith, to El-ahrairah) "All the world will be your enemy, Prince with a Thousand Enemies, and whenever they catch you, they will kill you. But first they must catch you, digger, listener, runner, prince with the swift warning. Be cunning and full of tricks and your people shall never be destroyed."
(The rabbit Thlayli, to General Woundwort, in the rabbit language Lapine) "Silflay hraka, u embleer rah!"

I could go on and on, but I will save my other arguments for later. I now give my opponent time to rebut.
TheDebateMaster1

Con

TheDebateMaster1 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
Cassie412

Pro

Watership Down is an excellent book, but you don't have to take my word for it. The following reviewers placed Watership Down very highly on their ratings.

Goodreads: 4 out of 5
Google books: 4 out of 5
Barnes and Noble: 4.5 out of 5
Amazon: 4.6 out of 5
Fantasy Book Review: 9.5 out of 10

Watership Down is a classic that has captivated readers for generations, and will continue to do so.
TheDebateMaster1

Con

TheDebateMaster1 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
Cassie412

Pro

My opponent had forfeited two rounds and has not given any evidence that The Jade Boy is the best book. Please vote for pro Watership Down.
TheDebateMaster1

Con

TheDebateMaster1 forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 4
22 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 10 records.
Posted by TheDebateMaster1 2 years ago
TheDebateMaster1
Interesting book choosen, Would agree, but I don't know the book really
Posted by macaztec 2 years ago
macaztec
"it's important to the story that he COULD have survived."

Very true
Posted by Cassie412 2 years ago
Cassie412
How do you cancel a debate? I'd like a real argument with somebody who will be respectful and actually reply to the question.
Posted by nzlockie 2 years ago
nzlockie
I think regardless of whether Woundwart survived our not, it's important to the story that he COULD have survived. One of the prevailing themes of Watership Down is that Evil exists and that Good ultimately triumphs.
The humans who set the snares, the ones who smoke the rabbits out, the ones who capture them, and Woundwart himself, all represent different degrees and faces of Evil. Ultimately the rabbits triumph over all of them, not by vanquishing them altogether, but by outsmarting them and running away to survive another day. This is the creed of the rabbit. So it's important that the idea of Woundwart still exist...
Posted by Bookworm223 2 years ago
Bookworm223
My best book is The Book Thief. It is not THE best book
Posted by macaztec 2 years ago
macaztec
Doubtful that he survived. I always figured he was killed by the dog, but I like to think that if he survived he ended up at the warren with the snares. ;)
Posted by AlexanderOc 2 years ago
AlexanderOc
Someone seems to have misunderstood what "this is not a serious debate" means.
Posted by Cassie412 2 years ago
Cassie412
Do you think Woundwort survived the dog? If so, where is he?
Posted by macaztec 2 years ago
macaztec
LMGIG....You did read the part where is excluded religious books right?
Posted by macaztec 2 years ago
macaztec
My favorite character's are Blackavar and Kehaar.
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by bladerunner060 2 years ago
bladerunner060
Cassie412TheDebateMaster1Tied
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Total points awarded:40 
Reasons for voting decision: Conduct due to the forfeits, arguments for the unrebutted case. As always, happy to clarify this RFD.