The Instigator
AribtraryMoniker
Pro (for)
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The Contender
swayamprakash
Con (against)
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Voting Style: Open Point System: Select Winner
Started: 5/31/2016 Category: Entertainment
Updated: 6 months ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 199 times Debate No: 92107
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (2)
Votes (0)

 

AribtraryMoniker

Pro

This is meant to be a fun, light hearted debate. Whoever accepts will offer three silly topics (Ex: macaroni is better than spaghetti, we should all wear bowler hats, pokemon is better than yu-gi-oh, etc.) in their first round And I will choose the one I like best.

If all of the topics offered by con are offensive, overly serious, skewed, truistic or otherwise inaccessible, then I'll choose a different topic entirely.

There are no hard line rules, just don't be a dick. I reserve the right to expand on what that means as necessary, but hopefully I won't have to. Just be a decent human being, and let's have a fun round!
swayamprakash

Con

accepted challenge! Will be offering three topics ; 1. Did God Exists? 2. competition in education - An obstacle to todays learning process 3. Hindu- Muslim- Christian and all other religion are one . These castes are people made not made by God?

I have offerd three topics if u dont accept anyone then u may offer any topic
Debate Round No. 1
AribtraryMoniker

Pro

Competition in education is an obstacle to today's learning process.
***

One of the most incredible things about learning is that rather than being a one-and-done type of thing, It is a continual and organic process. So long as we remember that we don't know everything, we can and will always learn. However when we try to integrate competition into the learning process, we end up of doing one of two things: We either have dichotomous winners and losers, or we rank students by how valuable we think their learning is. This causes students to believe that if they are designated the 'loser' or if they are ranked lowly that their learning is somehow less valuable than those who are 'winners' or otherwise more highly ranked. It frames learning as a singular thing that can be achieved and then stored away rather than an integral part of the human experience.

I'm not saying we can't learn as a product of a competition - for example, playing Pokemon with a friend may help one to read better or gain skills in logic and strategic planning. However when we place the horse before the cart by trying to make learning itself a competition, the learning process loses the spark that makes it such a driving thing - it makes the motivation to learn external rather than internal. When I learn something from playing a game, I'm learning because I'm excited about what I'm doing, but when I'm learning because I want to win a competition I'm really only treating learning as a means to an end. It's also important to note that we can learn from noncompetitive games; games are the prior question. learning as a result of competition isn't a bad thing - if one is invested in the competition then they will naturally learn from it. But we can't force that kind of investment by making learning itself a competition.

Competition fails to reward personal excellence. Different students come from different starting points as far as skill and capability goes. Writing a brilliant essay may be a cinch for one student, while another student may work twice as hard and write a paper only half as good. Competition fails to recognize the learning that happened for the student who put forward a great deal of effort on an essay that was graded as technically poorer. The student who wrote the worse essay would have learned more from the experience than the student who wrote the brilliant essay, but by pitting them against one another all of that learning and effort is made out to be nothing more than a loss.

So then the big reveal of all this, is that competition shifts out focus away from learning towards winning. Whether or not someone has 'learned' is a pretty intangible thing, one we can't always know. We can try to measure how much a student knows based on benchmarks for their peers, but we can't always individually know how much a student has learned. Competition doesn't recognize the excellence of students who have learned, it recognizes students who have won.
swayamprakash

Con

swayamprakash forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 2
AribtraryMoniker

Pro

~*.:s_a_d___d_a_y:.*~

:c
swayamprakash

Con

I don't know what u want to mean by ur arguements but I want to simply specify that competition has helped a child to gain recognition in this busy world. There was a time when he struggles for the recognition that he wants to get then there is only competition that helps him to regain its new form into his fast world . He tries not to get too stressed rather he is on the way to regain its lost respect through competing with other participants to be the world no.1 so that he could regain his identity and setup his own recognition
Debate Round No. 3
AribtraryMoniker

Pro

Con's response is criminally lacking, they utterly fail to respond to the advocacy presented up top while also outright admitting that they don't even understand the argument Pro presents. Even in their response story about a child finding recognition in a busy world, they fail to understand that in one child failing to gain recognition, many others lose it through the win-lose dichotomy inherent in competition.

Education ought to be it's own reward, and other students ought not be penalized because their lessons were shaped into something competitive rather than invitational. The important thesis of Pro's position of advocacy, and the thing that you should end up voting for in this debate, is making education a competition engenders inaccessibility into it. Something that shouldn't have barriers to access suddenly gets them so that a few students can be more highly motivated at the cost of all other students in the education system.

In summary, Con's story of a child finding recognition through competition is non-responsive to the Pro Advocacy, and if anything, only serves to re-ify the premise that competition makes education exclusive and inaccessible. Competition is a net harm to the education process.
swayamprakash

Con

Healthy competition inspires kids to do their best " not just good enough. When students compete they will become more inquisitive, research independently, and learn to work with others. They will strive to do more than is required. These abilities prepare children for future situations of all kinds. Whether it"s applying to college, seeking a promotion, or finding a cure for cancer, the ability to be competitive will give them an important edge.Competition can be a double-edged sword for kids, promoting positive values under the right conditions but creating negative environments that are demotivating under the wrong ones. Competition can be healthy when it provides feedback to kids about their performance and improvement, when winning is not the sole or primary objective, and when kids get to learn about themselves under challenging situations. Under these circumstances, competition can teach invaluable lessons our children do not typically learn in the classroom. Unfortunately, the frequent win-at-all costs mentality associated with many competitive endeavors can undermine children"s motivation and lead them to avoid or even disengage from activities they may otherwise enjoy. It is critical that coaches, educators, and parents work to teach kids these valuable lessons from competition. That way, win or lose, our children will learn, grow, and be better prepared for life, which (like competition) provides highlights, adversity, and continual opportunities to play well with others and treat opponents with dignity and respect. It is quite normal for people to judge themselves against others, thus in that respect competition is quite healthy. In a supportive environment it can teach a child to accept failure without losing self-esteem. However, it becomes unhealthy when the competitor is forced to compete or feels that they have to compete in order to gain love or status within the family.
I conclude in this final round that competition can be a boon for children of young age to take their carrer up and touch the skies
Debate Round No. 4
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by swayamprakash 6 months ago
swayamprakash
Sorry I was not available for round 2 as i have some personal problems , will continue from round 3. GOOD LUCK
Posted by AribtraryMoniker 6 months ago
AribtraryMoniker
I really like the competition topic. Thank you for writing it.

I'm looking forward to this debate!
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