The Instigator
desttoyer
Pro (for)
Tied
0 Points
The Contender
DefenderofBacon
Con (against)
Tied
0 Points

extra recess should be banned

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 2/27/2017 Category: Education
Updated: 1 year ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 668 times Debate No: 100375
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (4)
Votes (0)

 

desttoyer

Pro

extra recess is bad for kids bc they will get tired forget what they learned and could get frostbites or heat strokes
Legal liability is another justification for cutting recess times. Children could fall while
jumping rope or get hit with a baseball. Some administrators are skittish about making
themselves vulnerable to any legal action.
" As schools cut back on expenses because of budget cuts, paraprofessionals are often cut
from the staff and supervision at recess becomes a problem. Volunteers are difficult to
find for a recess duty.
" Strangers can access a playground easily at some schools and sexual predators could be
a concern.
" Bullying can also thrive in an unstructured environment. Bullying usually takes place
outside of the classroom in hallways, locker rooms, playgrounds, buses, and bathrooms.
Less recess time allows for less bullying time.A child"s safety during recess is a concern for many parents, teachers, and administrators. Some schools even have chosen to ban games or activities deemed unsafe and, in some cases, to discontinue recess altogether in light of the many issues connected with child safety.10,36 Although schools should ban games and activities that are unsafe, they should not discontinue recess altogether just because of concerns connected with child safety. There are measures schools can take to address these concerns and protect children while still preserving play during recess.5,11,24,28,34,37,38 Compliance with the Consumer Product Safety Commission"s Playground Safety Handbook
DefenderofBacon

Con

I choose to accept this debate.

While I was in grade school, we had a recess and a Physical Education class. Could you describe the school system that you are referring to? Does it have two recesses per day or one with a physical education class.

extra recess is bad for kids bc they will get tired forget what they learned and could get frostbites or heat strokes

Could you source a specific case in which a kid got heat stroke or frostbite while having two recesses? I have never heard of this happening myself so I am curious to how often it occurs. Also, for frostbite, it is a pretty simple fix: don't send the kids out when it is too cold. Most grade schools have a gym and they can spend their recess in there. Also, exercise tends to help with brain function, not the opposite. Read the article from Harvard to see what I am talking about.

" As schools cut back on expenses because of budget cuts, paraprofessionals are often cut
from the staff and supervision at recess becomes a problem. Volunteers are difficult to
find for a recess duty.
" Strangers can access a playground easily at some schools and sexual predators could be
a concern.
" Bullying can also thrive in an unstructured environment. Bullying usually takes place
outside of the classroom in hallways, locker rooms, playgrounds, buses, and bathrooms.

Volunteers for recess duty? Back in my grade school, they just made a teacher(s) do it. Sexual predators that go by schools are very small in number. As long as the school has cameras and teachers watching over the students, it shouldn't be a problem. Bullying does occur on playgrounds yes, but, if the teachers or volunteers are keeping a close watch on the students, then they can catch the bullying while it is happening.


Less recess time allows for less bullying time.A child"s safety during recess is a concern for many parents, teachers, and administrators. Some schools even have chosen to ban games or activities deemed unsafe and, in some cases, to discontinue recess altogether in light of the many issues connected with child safety.10,36 Although schools should ban games and activities that are unsafe, they should not discontinue recess altogether just because of concerns connected with child safety. There are measures schools can take to address these concerns and protect children while still preserving play during recess.5,11,24,28,34,37,38 Compliance with the Consumer Product Safety Commission"s Playground Safety Handbook


That's just a bad argument. It doesn't matter if there is less recess time. If a bully is really out to make your life a hell, then they won't stop because recess was cancelled. It honestly depends on what games are banned. Normally, if a game is occurring, then that means a coach or teacher is monitoring it. As long as you have a responsible adult around, then there should not be an issue with bullying on the playground. Children need exercise in order to thrive in school. They aren't like highschoolers or college students, who can go through school for 4-8 hours and retain things. Children need the release of being able to exercise and not cooped up in a school all day.

It seems your position is that recess is bad because bullying occurs. The solution to that is to not ban it, but get more adults (or more responsible adults) to watch the recess time.

Sources:

http://www.health.harvard.edu...



Debate Round No. 1
desttoyer

Pro

To be effective, structured recess requires that school personnel (or volunteers) receive adequate training so that they are able to address and encourage the diverse needs of all students.12,38 One aspect of supervision should be to facilitate social relationships among children by encouraging inclusiveness in games. A problem arises when the structured activities of recess are promoted as a replacement for the child"s physical education requirement. The replacement of physical education by recess threatens students" instruction in and acquisition of new motor skills, exploration of sports and rules, and a concept of lifelong physical fitness.24,30,34

There are ways to encourage a physically active recess without necessarily adding structured, planned, adult-led games, such as offering attractive, safe playground equipment to stimulate free play; establishing games/boundaries painted on the playground; or instructing children in games, such as four square or hopscotch.37,38,40 These types of activities can range from fully structured (with the adult directing and requiring participation) to partly unstructured (with adults providing supervision and initial instruction) to fully unstructured (supervision and social guidance). In structured, partly structured, or unstructured environments, activity levels vary widely on the basis of school policy, equipment provided, encouragement, age group, gender, and race.4,7,30,38,40 Consequently, the potential benefits of mandatory participation of all children in a purely structured recess must be weighed against the potential social and emotional trade-off of limiting acquisition of important developmental skills. Whichever style is chosen, recess should be viewed as a supplement to motor skill acquisition in physical education class.5,23,24,33,34
In the United States, the duration and timing of recess periods vary by age, grade, school district, and sometimes by building.4,7 The majority of elementary schools that offer lunch-time recess do so after the students eat lunch.4,37,41"44 Many school wellness councils have adopted the "Recess Before Lunch" concept which stems from studies that examined food waste by students in relation to the timing of their recess.42"44 When students have recess before lunch, more time is taken for lunch and less food is wasted. In addition, teachers and researchers noted an improvement in the student behavior at meal time, which carried into the classroom in the afternoon. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the US Department of Agriculture support the concept of scheduling recess before lunch as part of a school"s wellness policy.2,45

Peer-reviewed research has examined the timing and type of activity during recess and chronicled the many benefits of recess for children, without establishing an optimal required duration.2,8,12,13,18,19,21 There is consensus about the need for regularly scheduled recess based on national guidelines, even though the length of the recess period has not been firmly established. In schools, the length specified for recess ranges widely, from 20 to 60 minutes per day.24,30 In other countries, such as Japan, primary school-aged children have a 10- to 15-minute break every hour, and this is thought to reflect the fact that attention spans begin to wane after 40 to 50 minutes of intense instruction.46 On the basis of this premise, to maximize cognitive benefits, recess should be scheduled at regular intervals, providing children sufficient time to regain their focus before instruction continues.
DefenderofBacon

Con

Throughout round two, it seems as if you are supporting the notion of extra recess (or that it should just stay the same). What is meant by "extra recess"? While I was in grade school, we had a recess (15 minutes) and a Physical Education class (30 minutes). For the majority of our Physical Education class, they would organize a game (soccer, basketball, etc.) and then have teachers overview it. During recess, we were allowed to play outside (as long as the temperature permitted) or inside (only if we had to). It seems to me that your argument is not based around not having extra recess, but rather, having responsible adults to overlook the recess period. You even state that a recess before lunch benefits the children throughout the afternoon. Why would we want to take that energizing force away from them? The Japanese system of education is very different from our own. It is very strict with a heavy influence on the maths and sciences. Due to their system being strict, they allow the children more breaks as it is more tasking on the mind. Do you want extra recess banned in the United States or the whole world?

Again, your argument seems to be that the teachers just need to be more responsible in order to watch the children. I do agree that they should go through some sort of vetting (or "training") process in order to be able to watch children in an appropriate manner. As you stated, recess helps energize a kid and helps them to have a good attitude throughout the school day. Children need that release at least twice a day. At the end of it, recess will only take up 30 minutes of an 8 hour school day.
Debate Round No. 2
desttoyer

Pro

im not supporting recces

What's your favorite subject?" asks the ancient joke.

"Recess!" is the reply.

But, today, some students -- and teachers -- might not find the joke funny. That's because some cities, like Atlanta, have eliminated or cut back on recess in elementary school to free more time for instruction.

So why cut recess? With widespread stress being put on standardized tests throughout the United States, students need to prepare by spending more time on academics, the general argument goes. The extra time has to come from somewhere, and recess seems like a good place to trim.

"The big thing in this country now is standards," Marie Diamond, president of the Connecticut Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, stated in a recent Hartford Courant interview.

"We've raised the bar; our standards are higher," says Diamond. At the same time, she adds, "The majority of kids need some time for recess, just like people in offices need coffee breaks."

But the key to success in school and in life, many education experts say, is academic learning. Shaving a few minutes from recess, or even eliminating it altogether, they argue, won't hurt children. Play has educational value, they admit, but play can occur outside of school; school should be devoted to academics.

Have You Seen
These Articles
From the
Ed World Archive?
Recess Before Lunch Can Mean Happier, Healthier Kids
Recess follows lunch almost as predictably as four follows three, because it always has been that way. Principals who have put recess first, though, have noticed children eat more and behave better after lunch. Included: Ideas for making the change to recess before lunch.

Playground Pass Creates Recess Success!
If you've done recess duty, you know the playground is not all fun and games! Wouldn't you love a simple, straightforward teaching tool that steers students away from trouble and into recess success? The Playground Pass does just that!

Recess: Necessity or Nicety?
The pressure for schools to improve student test scores is so intense that some are abandoning the childhood treasure of "recess" in lieu of more on-task time. Education World asked educators about recess practices at their schools and the importance of free time for kids to be kids. Included: Tips for a safe and productive recess period.

No Break Today!
Faced with a need to find more time to meet increasing educational standards, 40 percent of schools in the United States have either cut recess or are considering doing so. But does cutting recess really gain more learning time? Read what the experts -- and columnist Linda Starr -- have to say about the growing trend toward "all work and no play."

boom!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
DefenderofBacon

Con

Alright.

So why cut recess? With widespread stress being put on standardized tests throughout the United States, students need to prepare by spending more time on academics, the general argument goes. The extra time has to come from somewhere, and recess seems like a good place to trim.

Why not just get better teachers who are more equipped to teach the children what they need to know? What is taking five minutes out of recess ultimately going to do?

"The big thing in this country now is standards," Marie Diamond, president of the Connecticut Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development, stated in a recent Hartford Courant interview.

"We've raised the bar; our standards are higher," says Diamond. At the same time, she adds, "The majority of kids need some time for recess, just like people in offices need coffee breaks."

Exactly what this woman says. How about, if children can no longer get recess, adults can't have breaks at work. Yeah, we will see how long that lasts. This education expert believes that children need breaks in order to strive for better grades.


But the key to success in school and in life, many education experts say, is academic learning. Shaving a few minutes from recess, or even eliminating it altogether, they argue, won't hurt children. Play has educational value, they admit, but play can occur outside of school; school should be devoted to academics.

Where are the articles? Which educational experts said that? Please source next time so I can read up on it.

Recess Before Lunch Can Mean Happier, Healthier Kids
Recess follows lunch almost as predictably as four follows three, because it always has been that way. Principals who have put recess first, though, have noticed children eat more and behave better after lunch. Included: Ideas for making the change to recess before lunch.

Okay. So here it states that recess before lunch is a good thing and can help the children. So, why not just do recess twice a day so they will be energized both in the morning and the afternoon?

Playground Pass Creates Recess Success!
If you've done recess duty, you know the playground is not all fun and games! Wouldn't you love a simple, straightforward teaching tool that steers students away from trouble and into recess success? The Playground Pass does just that!

Pro gives no definition of a "Playground Pass" and neither does she source it.


Recess: Necessity or Nicety?
The pressure for schools to improve student test scores is so intense that some are abandoning the childhood treasure of "recess" in lieu of more on-task time. Education World asked educators about recess practices at their schools and the importance of free time for kids to be kids. Included: Tips for a safe and productive recess period.

So, now you are back to arguing for recess? I am pretty sure that this was just copied and pasted (educationworld.com) without it being sourced. The source that I found, it is literally supporting recess saying how it is beneficial for kids before they enter high school as well as playing roles while on the playground during recess.

No Break Today!
Faced with a need to find more time to meet increasing educational standards, 40 percent of schools in the United States have either cut recess or are considering doing so. But does cutting recess really gain more learning time? Read what the experts -- and columnist Linda Starr -- have to say about the growing trend toward "all work and no play."

Where is that statistic from? Pro does not cite where the numerical statistic comes from. I don't want to read what they have to say. I want to read it from the debater and sourced by them.

Now, onto my core arguments:

1. Exercise

According to cdc.gov, the obesity rate among children (age 6-19) is 1 in five. Obesity is having extra body fat. This is probably the biggest reason as to why recess should stay. This gives children the opportunity to exercise in school, instead of just sitting there for 8 hours.

2. Social Skills

Many schools are not allowing children to talk in class or even during lunch (pathwaystofamilywellness.org). Recess is the perfect time for socializing and building social skills, especially before going to high school.

3. Recess is a break

As you have stated, that standards of children are much higher than what they used to be. They are in need of a break that can benefit both their minds and their bodies. According to pathwaysoffamilywellness.org, recess both reduces stress and increases their focus in school. This is invaluable as nothing else done throughout the school day can cause the same thing (perhaps, with the exception of lunch).


Those were my rebuttals and my core arguments for this debate. I will leave it up for the voters to decide who wins. Good job in the debate and good luck.


Sources:

http://www.educationworld.com...
https://www.cdc.gov...
http://pathwaystofamilywellness.org...
Debate Round No. 3
4 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 4 records.
Posted by desttoyer 1 year ago
desttoyer
lol
Posted by DefenderofBacon 1 year ago
DefenderofBacon
Oh dear 179 days for voting...
Posted by desttoyer 1 year ago
desttoyer
true
Posted by Dirty-Morgs 1 year ago
Dirty-Morgs
some people were never allowed out of the house as kids
No votes have been placed for this debate.