The Instigator
Silk
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
Astal3
Pro (for)
Winning
6 Points

free will

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 1 vote the winner is...
Astal3
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 7/13/2014 Category: Philosophy
Updated: 2 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 517 times Debate No: 58905
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (5)
Votes (1)

 

Silk

Con

Nothing in this (or any other) universe has a free will.
Just as an apple seed must develop into an apple tree
and do exactly what apple trees do humans are likewise
so obliged. Some humans do "believe" they have a free will,
some humans "believe" a lot of things like what's in the bible
however when it comes to that thing called 'truth' they get tongue
tied. Just as the Big Bang was "Orchestrated" by some mysterious
"intelligent" entity I shall call "the uncreated creator" everything after
the BB was so intended to unfold a specific way as did the speed of light
and gravity. It is this fear of helplessness that is responsible for the rejection
of free will by some humans. They were programmed to so believe just as they
were programmed to do & believe everything else they do. If you understand the
use of "heuristic" which I invoked to arrive at this conclusion you'll know my trip.
Astal3

Pro

"Free Will" is a philosophical term of art for a particular sort of capacity of rational agents to choose a course of action from among various alternatives. Which sort is the free will sort is what all the fuss is about. (And what a fuss it has been: philosophers have debated this question for over two millennia, and just about every major philosopher has had something to say about it.) Most philosophers suppose that the concept of free will is very closely connected to the concept of moral responsibility. Acting with free will, on such views, is just to satisfy the metaphysical requirement on being responsible for one's action. (Clearly, there will also be epistemic conditions on responsibility as well, such as being aware"or failing that, being culpably unaware"of relevant alternatives to one's action and of the alternatives' moral significance.) But the significance of free will is not exhausted by its connection to moral responsibility. Free will also appears to be a condition on desert for one's accomplishments (why sustained effort and creative work are praiseworthy); on the autonomy and dignity of persons; and on the value we accord to love and friendship. "

The debate tittle is a statement rather than a question. My opponent has made the claim that free will does not exist in any universe. Such a statement includes infinite variables and points of view. Therefore the BOP is on con for this debate.

I accept this challenge and I wish the greatest of success to my opponent. So lets do this.

http://plato.stanford.edu...
Debate Round No. 1
Silk

Con

Silk forfeited this round.
Astal3

Pro

In order to make things fair I will pass this round so my opponent has a chance for equal representation.
Debate Round No. 2
Silk

Con

Silk forfeited this round.
Astal3

Pro

Unfortunatly my opponent has forfeited this debate. All I will say is free will can be defined as many things. From thoughts to feelings to actions. Everyone who is reading this right now is doing so as an act of free will. They do not have to read anything, but they chose to. Some may say breathing is not an act of free will. Though it is true that your body automatically regulates your breathing, as long as you are concious you can choose not to breath. If that isn't free will then I'm not sure what would qualify. I thank my opponent for making this debate and I hope that maybe we can try again later.
Debate Round No. 3
5 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 5 records.
Posted by Silk 2 years ago
Silk
I began this but in all fairness must say it is one of those mute questions..but anyways some considerations.
We are creations in that we did not create ourselves.. no argument here. Creations require a creator..by this very definition a creation is capable of only that which its creator endowed it with. This, I feel, goes for everything that exists. Now humans seem (need to) believe they are an exception to this? That somehow they are greater than the sum of their parts. Fact: humans are simply johnny come latelys. Coach roaches were here long before humans "unchanged"! and will for all intense & purposes be here after humans have expired.. Humans are just another,experiment.. obviously a failed one.They are the only creatures who do not live in harmony with this environment. The only thing special or superior about them is their opinion they are so. Just as a humans physical shape is predetermined so is their mental (intelligence - talents ect)
make up and all about them.. how they will react to any stimulus is also pre-programmed.. so much for free
will..I know for certain 'not' but this seems more reasonable than not.. to use reasonable in connection with humans is unreasonable. Why do humans crave certain things..love..alcohol..power? No free will here.. no free will anywhere in the human.. except in their imaginations! It's all fixed as in stimulus & reaction. Read it and weep that is if you were pre-programmed to so do or not.
Posted by dannyc 2 years ago
dannyc
Pro has defined Free Will as "Free Will" is a philosophical term of art for a particular sort of capacity of rational agents to choose a course of action from among various alternatives."

Unless you challenge it, you got to accept it as being the standard definition of the debate.
Posted by pivot 2 years ago
pivot
Sort of like the movie 'The Terminator' where the bad guy is part human part machine. The human part decides how to proceed but the machine part must proceed.
Posted by Cold-Mind 2 years ago
Cold-Mind
Define free will and make a clear resolution please.
Posted by dannyc 2 years ago
dannyc
Are we defining Free Will such as 'The ability to freely do what the Will desires or chooses?' Hume's definition?
1 votes has been placed for this debate.
Vote Placed by lannan13 2 years ago
lannan13
SilkAstal3Tied
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Total points awarded:06 
Reasons for voting decision: FF