The Instigator
blueiceswag
Pro (for)
Losing
14 Points
The Contender
Redfireswag
Con (against)
Winning
18 Points

home work should be banned

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 8 votes the winner is...
Redfireswag
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 4/19/2013 Category: Education
Updated: 4 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 2,575 times Debate No: 32678
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (13)
Votes (8)

 

blueiceswag

Pro

why do kid need homeworkNot all the experiments are positive, though. In the 2010-2011 school year, the schools in Irving, Texas, stopped counting homework as part of a student"s grade. After six weeks, more than half the high school students were failing a class--a huge increase. The kids seem to lack the judgment and experience to know on their own when additional studying or work outside class is needed in order to pass tests and complete projects.

There ought to be a middle ground. Mandating "no homework" days or weekends, or setting guidelines for how much time children should spend on homework according to their age, seems reasonable.

One leading researcher, Harris Cooper at Duke University, recommends 10 minutes of homework a night for each grade a child is in. In other words, 10 minutes in first grade, 30 minutes in third grade, etc. For middle school and high school students, Cooper found no academic gains after one-and-a-half to two hours of homework a night.

Couldn"t teachers assign homework only when the work really can"t be accomplished in school? Say, for a project where kids are interviewing various people on a topic?

Cutting back on homework can make the difference in whether some students even attempt the assignment. And teachers who assign large amounts of homework are often unable to do anything more than spot-check it. Shouldn"t teachers have the time to read homework closely, so they can see whether kids are learning?

One problem is that parents have trouble even finding out what the assignment is. This sounds straightforward, but parents for the most part only know what kids tell them. In this digital age, schools should communicate better.

Poorly thought-out assignments can make students cynical about school and crush their love of learning. I"m sure you"ve heard the perennial question, "Am I really going to use this after I graduate?"

Some countries teach their children well without much homework. In Finland, for example, which ranks near the top in science worldwide, a half-hour of homework in high school is the norm.

Like many things in life, homework may be a case where less really is more.

As school doors swing open, it will be time once again to engage the homework battles.

A major front, every year, is the parents" complaint that schools give too much homework. This campaign has received recent reinforcement with the publication of "Teach Your Children Well" by Madeline Levine, a psychologist who treats adolescents in affluent Marin County, Calif. Levine says that high-pressure parenting with Ivy League goals can leave kids feeling empty inside. Family rituals that generate enthusiasm and contentment are being lost.

Canada has gotten this message. The nation"s education minister has directed schools to make sure students are not overloaded. Toronto schools, with nearly 300,000 kids, have limited elementary school homework to reading, eliminated holiday homework and adopted language endorsing the value of family time.

U.S. schools also are experimenting with reduced homework, but there is no national directive like in Canada.

The Banks County Middle School in Homer, Ga., stopped assigning regular homework in 2005. Grades are up, and so are results on statewide tests.

The Kino School, a private K-12 school in Tucson, Ariz., allows time for homework during the school day. Kids can get help with the work if they need it, or spend the time socializing and do their homework later. Giving kids this choice teaches them to manage their time.

Not all the experiments are positive, though. In the 2010-2011 school year, the schools in Irving, Texas, stopped counting homework as part of a student"s grade. After six weeks, more than half the high school students were failing a class--a huge increase. The kids seem to lack the judgment and experience to know on their own when additional studying or work outside class is needed in order to pass tests and complete projects.

There ought to be a middle ground. Mandating "no homework" days or weekends, or setting guidelines for how much time children should spend on homework according to their age, seems reasonable.

One leading researcher, Harris Cooper at Duke University, recommends 10 minutes of homework a night for each grade a child is in. In other words, 10 minutes in first grade, 30 minutes in third grade, etc. For middle school and high school students, Cooper found no academic gains after one-and-a-half to two hours of homework a night.

Couldn"t teachers assign homework only when the work really can"t be accomplished in school? Say, for a project where kids are interviewing various people on a topic?

Cutting back on homework can make the difference in whether some students even attempt the assignment. And teachers who assign large amounts of homework are often unable to do anything more than spot-check it. Shouldn"t teachers have the time to read homework closely, so they can see whether kids are learning?

One problem is that parents have trouble even finding out what the assignment is. This sounds straightforward, but parents for the most part only know what kids tell them. In this digital age, schools should communicate better.

Poorly thought-out assignments can make students cynical about school and crush their love of learning. I"m sure you"ve heard the perennial question, "Am I really going to use this after I graduate?"

Some countries teach their children well without much homework. In Finland, for example, which ranks near the top in science worldwide, a half-hour of homework in high school is the norm.

Like many things in life, homework may be a case where less really is more.

As school doors swing open, it will be time once again to engage the homework battles.

A major front, every year, is the parents" complaint that schools give too much homework. This campaign has received recent reinforcement with the publication of "Teach Your Children Well" by Madeline Levine, a psychologist who treats adolescents in affluent Marin County, Calif. Levine says that high-pressure parenting with Ivy League goals can leave kids feeling empty inside. Family rituals that generate enthusiasm and contentment are being lost.

Canada has gotten this message. The nation"s education minister has directed schools to make sure students are not overloaded. Toronto schools, with nearly 300,000 kids, have limited elementary school homework to reading, eliminated holiday homework and adopted language endorsing the value of family time.

U.S. schools also are experimenting with reduced homework, but there is no national directive like in Canada.

The Banks County Middle School in Homer, Ga., stopped assigning regular homework in 2005. Grades are up, and so are results on statewide tests.

The Kino School, a private K-12 school in Tucson, Ariz., allows time for homework during the school day. Kids can get help with the work if they need it, or spend the time socializing and do their homework later. Giving kids this choice teaches them to manage their time.

Not all the experiments are positive, though. In the 2010-2011 school year, the schools in Irving, Texas, stopped counting homework as part of a student"s grade. After six weeks, more than half the high school students were failing a class--a huge increase. The kids seem to lack the judgment and experience to know on their own when additional studying or work outside class is needed in order to pass tests and complete projects.

There ought to be a middle ground. Mandating "no homework" days or weekends, or setting guidelines for how much time children should spend on homework according to their age, seems reasonable.

One leading researcher, Harris Cooper at Duke University, recommends 10 minutes of homework a night for each grade a child is in. In other words, 10 minutes in first grade, 30 minutes in third grade, etc. For middle school and high school students, Cooper found no academic gains a
Redfireswag

Con

I firmly believe that homework should not be banned in Primary school. It serves a very worthwhile purpose for Primary aged children.

Firstly, I believe when children grow up they won"t get a good job and that means they will not have any money to live on. If you don"t get a good job you will not be able to buy anything that you want.

Secondly, I believe if there was no homework there would be less smart people. There would be no one to invent new things and we would be using the same old things. And someone needs to invent something to be used instead of plastic.

Thirdly, I believe homework is better than being lazy. It is better doing homework than watching television because your eyes will be sore and you will be square eyed. And I think it would be better to use your brain to do homework than to eat junk food.

Fourthly, I believe you will get ahead for high school. If you do a lot of homework .In high school there is a lot of homework and it will make you be ready for exams and tests
Debate Round No. 1
blueiceswag

Pro

why do kid need homeworkNot all the experiments are positive, though. In the 2010-2011 school year, the schools in Irving, Texas, stopped counting homework as part of a student"s grade. After six weeks, more than half the high school students were failing a class--a huge increase. The kids seem to lack the judgment and experience to know on their own when additional studying or work outside class is needed in order to pass tests and complete projects.

There ought to be a middle ground. Mandating "no homework" days or weekends, or setting guidelines for how much time children should spend on homework according to their age, seems reasonable.

One leading researcher, Harris Cooper at Duke University, recommends 10 minutes of homework a night for each grade a child is in. In other words, 10 minutes in first grade, 30 minutes in third grade, etc. For middle school and high school students, Cooper found no academic gains after one-and-a-half to two hours of homework a night.

Couldn"t teachers assign homework only when the work really can"t be accomplished in school? Say, for a project where kids are interviewing various people on a topic?

Cutting back on homework can make the difference in whether some students even attempt the assignment. And teachers who assign large amounts of homework are often unable to do anything more than spot-check it. Shouldn"t teachers have the time to read homework closely, so they can see whether kids are learning?

One problem is that parents have trouble even finding out what the assignment is. This sounds straightforward, but parents for the most part only know what kids tell them. In this digital age, schools should communicate better.

Poorly thought-out assignments can make students cynical about school and crush their love of learning. I"m sure you"ve heard the perennial question, "Am I really going to use this after I graduate?"

Some countries teach their children well without much homework. In Finland, for example, which ranks near the top in science worldwide, a half-hour of homework in high school is the norm.

Like many things in life, homework may be a case where less really is more.

As school doors swing open, it will be time once again to engage the homework battles.

A major front, every year, is the parents" complaint that schools give too much homework. This campaign has received recent reinforcement with the publication of "Teach Your Children Well" by Madeline Levine, a psychologist who treats adolescents in affluent Marin County, Calif. Levine says that high-pressure parenting with Ivy League goals can leave kids feeling empty inside. Family rituals that generate enthusiasm and contentment are being lost.

Canada has gotten this message. The nation"s education minister has directed schools to make sure students are not overloaded. Toronto schools, with nearly 300,000 kids, have limited elementary school homework to reading, eliminated holiday homework and adopted language endorsing the value of family time.

U.S. schools also are experimenting with reduced homework, but there is no national directive like in Canada.

The Banks County Middle School in Homer, Ga., stopped assigning regular homework in 2005. Grades are up, and so are results on statewide tests.

The Kino School, a private K-12 school in Tucson, Ariz., allows time for homework during the school day. Kids can get help with the work if they need it, or spend the time socializing and do their homework later. Giving kids this choice teaches them to manage their time.

Not all the experiments are positive, though. In the 2010-2011 school year, the schools in Irving, Texas, stopped counting homework as part of a student"s grade. After six weeks, more than half the high school students were failing a class--a huge increase. The kids seem to lack the judgment and experience to know on their own when additional studying or work outside class is needed in order to pass tests and complete projects.

There ought to be a middle ground. Mandating "no homework" days or weekends, or setting guidelines for how much time children should spend on homework according to their age, seems reasonable.

One leading researcher, Harris Cooper at Duke University, recommends 10 minutes of homework a night for each grade a child is in. In other words, 10 minutes in first grade, 30 minutes in third grade, etc. For middle school and high school students, Cooper found no academic gains after one-and-a-half to two hours of homework a night.

Couldn"t teachers assign homework only when the work really can"t be accomplished in school? Say, for a project where kids are interviewing various people on a topic?

Cutting back on homework can make the difference in whether some students even attempt the assignment. And teachers who assign large amounts of homework are often unable to do anything more than spot-check it. Shouldn"t teachers have the time to read homework closely, so they can see whether kids are learning?

One problem is that parents have trouble even finding out what the assignment is. This sounds straightforward, but parents for the most part only know what kids tell them. In this digital age, schools should communicate better.

Poorly thought-out assignments can make students cynical about school and crush their love of learning. I"m sure you"ve heard the perennial question, "Am I really going to use this after I graduate?"

Some countries teach their children well without much homework. In Finland, for example, which ranks near the top in science worldwide, a half-hour of homework in high school is the norm.

Like many things in life, homework may be a case where less really is more.

As school doors swing open, it will be time once again to engage the homework battles.

A major front, every year, is the parents" complaint that schools give too much homework. This campaign has received recent reinforcement with the publication of "Teach Your Children Well" by Madeline Levine, a psychologist who treats adolescents in affluent Marin County, Calif. Levine says that high-pressure parenting with Ivy League goals can leave kids feeling empty inside. Family rituals that generate enthusiasm and contentment are being lost.

Canada has gotten this message. The nation"s education minister has directed schools to make sure students are not overloaded. Toronto schools, with nearly 300,000 kids, have limited elementary school homework to reading, eliminated holiday homework and adopted language endorsing the value of family time.

U.S. schools also are experimenting with reduced homework, but there is no national directive like in Canada.

The Banks County Middle School in Homer, Ga., stopped assigning regular homework in 2005. Grades are up, and so are results on statewide tests.

The Kino School, a private K-12 school in Tucson, Ariz., allows time for homework during the school day. Kids can get help with the work if they need it, or spend the time socializing and do their homework later. Giving kids this choice teaches them to manage their time.

Not all the experiments are positive, though. In the 2010-2011 school year, the schools in Irving, Texas, stopped counting homework as part of a student"s grade. After six weeks, more than half the high school students were failing a class--a huge increase. The kids seem to lack the judgment and experience to know on their own when additional studying or work outside class is needed in order to pass tests and complete projects.

There ought to be a middle ground. Mandating "no homework" days or weekends, or setting guidelines for how much time children should spend on homework according to their age, seems reasonable.

One leading researcher, Harris Cooper at Duke University, recommends 10 minutes of homework a night for each grade a child is in. In other words, 10 minutes in first grade, 30 minutes in third grade, etc. For middle school and high school students, Cooper found no academic gains a
Redfireswag

Con

Reason why homework shouldn't banned is that it helps you learn some stuff. Don't you want to become a doctor or a pilot? If you don't have homework, and play 24/7 or so called play all day, you might become a hobo or even homeless when you grow up.

Homework also helps you improve your life. How?? Well here is some reasons:

1) Teaches about nature (science)
2) Learn from other peoples mistakes instead of doing it over again
3) Calculate easily when shopping (reccommended for girls :p)
4) Not become a hobo
5) Get married happily (some people dont want to get married :p)

Also homework doesn't take like 5 hours. Normal school periods are about 5 and homeworks are 5 different types. They should be done within 2 1/2 hours.

Without homework you wouldn't become smart, or if you are already smart you will become dumber, you will not know how to heal yourself (science), you will not know why you died, you will not know what the price with the tax is (mathematics), you will not know why moon fell onto earth (that might happen someday), you will not know when the heck is your birthday which is really embarassing.

I thank my opponent for following the directions. As I have said earlier, if one of the debaters forfeit, the round is cancelled if it is a good reason.
Debate Round No. 2
blueiceswag

Pro

why do kid need homeworkNot all the experiments are positive, though. In the 2010-2011 school year, the schools in Irving, Texas, stopped counting homework as part of a student"s grade. After six weeks, more than half the high school students were failing a class--a huge increase. The kids seem to lack the judgment and experience to know on their own when additional studying or work outside class is needed in order to pass tests and complete projects.

There ought to be a middle ground. Mandating "no homework" days or weekends, or setting guidelines for how much time children should spend on homework according to their age, seems reasonable.

One leading researcher, Harris Cooper at Duke University, recommends 10 minutes of homework a night for each grade a child is in. In other words, 10 minutes in first grade, 30 minutes in third grade, etc. For middle school and high school students, Cooper found no academic gains after one-and-a-half to two hours of homework a night.

Couldn"t teachers assign homework only when the work really can"t be accomplished in school? Say, for a project where kids are interviewing various people on a topic?

Cutting back on homework can make the difference in whether some students even attempt the assignment. And teachers who assign large amounts of homework are often unable to do anything more than spot-check it. Shouldn"t teachers have the time to read homework closely, so they can see whether kids are learning?

One problem is that parents have trouble even finding out what the assignment is. This sounds straightforward, but parents for the most part only know what kids tell them. In this digital age, schools should communicate better.

Poorly thought-out assignments can make students cynical about school and crush their love of learning. I"m sure you"ve heard the perennial question, "Am I really going to use this after I graduate?"

Some countries teach their children well without much homework. In Finland, for example, which ranks near the top in science worldwide, a half-hour of homework in high school is the norm.

Like many things in life, homework may be a case where less really is more.

As school doors swing open, it will be time once again to engage the homework battles.

A major front, every year, is the parents" complaint that schools give too much homework. This campaign has received recent reinforcement with the publication of "Teach Your Children Well" by Madeline Levine, a psychologist who treats adolescents in affluent Marin County, Calif. Levine says that high-pressure parenting with Ivy League goals can leave kids feeling empty inside. Family rituals that generate enthusiasm and contentment are being lost.

Canada has gotten this message. The nation"s education minister has directed schools to make sure students are not overloaded. Toronto schools, with nearly 300,000 kids, have limited elementary school homework to reading, eliminated holiday homework and adopted language endorsing the value of family time.

U.S. schools also are experimenting with reduced homework, but there is no national directive like in Canada.

The Banks County Middle School in Homer, Ga., stopped assigning regular homework in 2005. Grades are up, and so are results on statewide tests.

The Kino School, a private K-12 school in Tucson, Ariz., allows time for homework during the school day. Kids can get help with the work if they need it, or spend the time socializing and do their homework later. Giving kids this choice teaches them to manage their time.

Not all the experiments are positive, though. In the 2010-2011 school year, the schools in Irving, Texas, stopped counting homework as part of a student"s grade. After six weeks, more than half the high school students were failing a class--a huge increase. The kids seem to lack the judgment and experience to know on their own when additional studying or work outside class is needed in order to pass tests and complete projects.

There ought to be a middle ground. Mandating "no homework" days or weekends, or setting guidelines for how much time children should spend on homework according to their age, seems reasonable.

One leading researcher, Harris Cooper at Duke University, recommends 10 minutes of homework a night for each grade a child is in. In other words, 10 minutes in first grade, 30 minutes in third grade, etc. For middle school and high school students, Cooper found no academic gains after one-and-a-half to two hours of homework a night.

Couldn"t teachers assign homework only when the work really can"t be accomplished in school? Say, for a project where kids are interviewing various people on a topic?

Cutting back on homework can make the difference in whether some students even attempt the assignment. And teachers who assign large amounts of homework are often unable to do anything more than spot-check it. Shouldn"t teachers have the time to read homework closely, so they can see whether kids are learning?

One problem is that parents have trouble even finding out what the assignment is. This sounds straightforward, but parents for the most part only know what kids tell them. In this digital age, schools should communicate better.

Poorly thought-out assignments can make students cynical about school and crush their love of learning. I"m sure you"ve heard the perennial question, "Am I really going to use this after I graduate?"

Some countries teach their children well without much homework. In Finland, for example, which ranks near the top in science worldwide, a half-hour of homework in high school is the norm.

Like many things in life, homework may be a case where less really is more.

As school doors swing open, it will be time once again to engage the homework battles.

A major front, every year, is the parents" complaint that schools give too much homework. This campaign has received recent reinforcement with the publication of "Teach Your Children Well" by Madeline Levine, a psychologist who treats adolescents in affluent Marin County, Calif. Levine says that high-pressure parenting with Ivy League goals can leave kids feeling empty inside. Family rituals that generate enthusiasm and contentment are being lost.

Canada has gotten this message. The nation"s education minister has directed schools to make sure students are not overloaded. Toronto schools, with nearly 300,000 kids, have limited elementary school homework to reading, eliminated holiday homework and adopted language endorsing the value of family time.

U.S. schools also are experimenting with reduced homework, but there is no national directive like in Canada.

The Banks County Middle School in Homer, Ga., stopped assigning regular homework in 2005. Grades are up, and so are results on statewide tests.

The Kino School, a private K-12 school in Tucson, Ariz., allows time for homework during the school day. Kids can get help with the work if they need it, or spend the time socializing and do their homework later. Giving kids this choice teaches them to manage their time.

Not all the experiments are positive, though. In the 2010-2011 school year, the schools in Irving, Texas, stopped counting homework as part of a student"s grade. After six weeks, more than half the high school students were failing a class--a huge increase. The kids seem to lack the judgment and experience to know on their own when additional studying or work outside class is needed in order to pass tests and complete projects.

There ought to be a middle ground. Mandating "no homework" days or weekends, or setting guidelines for how much time children should spend on homework according to their age, seems reasonable.

One leading researcher, Harris Cooper at Duke University, recommends 10 minutes of homework a night for each grade a child is in. In other words, 10 minutes in first grade, 30 minutes in third grade, etc. For middle school and high school students, Cooper found no academic gains a
Redfireswag

Con

The subject of homework being banned has been discussed and debated for years by students, teachers and parents. Both sides of the argument have numerous reasons for their decision, but here are some of the reasons why homework should not be banned from schools.
First of all, homework encourages students to undertake independent learning which they will be required to do when they get to University. Many people argue that schools spoon-feed their students, which makes them completely unprepared for what awaits them at higher education when all research and further reading must be done on the student"s own time. By setting homework in the form of projects, students will be able to learn on their own and develop skills that will serve them well in later life. It also helps to teach the students responsibility and time management skills, seeing as the teacher is not there to make them learn.
Secondly, a lot of students prefer to learn on their own and teach themselves, rather than having a teacher lecture them. Homework encourages children to do this and may also help them to revise it more thoroughly. Whatever students have learnt in the classroom can then be reinforced and solidified by completing homework tasks.
Homework can also be beneficial for the teacher as when they collect homework in to mark it, it gives them a good idea of how much their students understand what is being taught.
Practice makes perfect as the saying goes. So the only way to get better at algebra is to practice it, which is why teachers set homework. It help to encourage a great number of skills that students will find extremely useful not only in school and any further education that they may go on to, but also in jobs that they will have.
Debate Round No. 3
blueiceswag

Pro

As school doors swing open, it will be time once again to engage the homework battles.

A major front, every year, is the parents" complaint that schools give too much homework. This campaign has received recent reinforcement with the publication of "Teach Your Children Well" by Madeline Levine, a psychologist who treats adolescents in affluent Marin County, Calif. Levine says that high-pressure parenting with Ivy League goals can leave kids feeling empty inside. Family rituals that generate enthusiasm and contentment are being lost.

Canada has gotten this message. The nation"s education minister has directed schools to make sure students are not overloaded. Toronto schools, with nearly 300,000 kids, have limited elementary school homework to reading, eliminated holiday homework and adopted language endorsing the value of family time.

U.S. schools also are experimenting with reduced homework, but there is no national directive like in Canada.

The Banks County Middle School in Homer, Ga., stopped assigning regular homework in 2005. Grades are up, and so are results on statewide tests.

The Kino School, a private K-12 school in Tucson, Ariz., allows time for homework during the school day. Kids can get help with the work if they need it, or spend the time socializing and do their homework later. Giving kids this choice teaches them to manage their time.

Not all the experiments are positive, though. In the 2010-2011 school year, the schools in Irving, Texas, stopped counting homework as part of a student"s grade. After six weeks, more than half the high school students were failing a class--a huge increase. The kids seem to lack the judgment and experience to know on their own when additional studying or work outside class is needed in order to pass tests and complete projects.

There ought to be a middle ground. Mandating "no homework" days or weekends, or setting guidelines for how much time children should spend on homework according to their age, seems reasonable.

One leading researcher, Harris Cooper at Duke University, recommends 10 minutes of homework a night for each grade a child is in. In other words, 10 minutes in first grade, 30 minutes in third grade, etc. For middle school and high school students, Cooper found no academic gains after one-and-a-half to two hours of homework a night.

Couldn"t teachers assign homework only when the work really can"t be accomplished in school? Say, for a project where kids are interviewing various people on a topic?

Cutting back on homework can make the difference in whether some students even attempt the assignment. And teachers who assign large amounts of homework are often unable to do anything more than spot-check it. Shouldn"t teachers have the time to read homework closely, so they can see whether kids are learning?

One problem is that parents have trouble even finding out what the assignment is. This sounds straightforward, but parents for the most part only know what kids tell them. In this digital age, schools should communicate better.

Poorly thought-out assignments can make students cynical about school and crush their love of learning. I"m sure you"ve heard the perennial question, "Am I really going to use this after I graduate?"

Some countries teach their children well without much homework. In Finland, for example, which ranks near the top in science worldwide, a half-hour of homework in high school is the norm.

Like many things in life, homework may be a case where less really is more.
Redfireswag

Con

School without homework is not an image I can fathom. There are many reasons homework should not be abolished as it is beneficial towards the student, allows the teacher to acknowledge the student's weaknesses; in turn giving them an opportunity to improve and acquire new skills. Also, taking time each night to do homework is a chance for students to catch up on missed class and further reinforces the day's lessons so it is permanently etched in the student's mind where the information is stored and used when called upon.

Several studies have proven that homework, in fact, does improve the stability of the student in school; this strengthens the statement that time spent completing homework is time well spent. Rather than giving students another hour of leisure time, doing homework entitles the student to an hour of enriched education; this can greatly benefit the student, as consistently finishing homework...
Debate Round No. 4
13 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 10 records.
Posted by GeekiTheGreat 4 years ago
GeekiTheGreat
The language skills of you two is outrageous. lol
Posted by Redfireswag 4 years ago
Redfireswag
yes good job pro
Posted by Redfireswag 4 years ago
Redfireswag
sorry people
Posted by Redfireswag 4 years ago
Redfireswag
VOTE BATMAn BITCH&&@*(
Posted by bschwartz88888888 4 years ago
bschwartz88888888
dayum playboy
Posted by Redfireswag 4 years ago
Redfireswag
hello out there
Posted by Redfireswag 4 years ago
Redfireswag
REPORTED MOTHER f
Posted by Redfireswag 4 years ago
Redfireswag
HEY PLAYBOy
Posted by Redfireswag 4 years ago
Redfireswag
i WIN
Posted by Redfireswag 4 years ago
Redfireswag
Vote Right
8 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 8 records.
Vote Placed by richardfrost 4 years ago
richardfrost
blueiceswagRedfireswagTied
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Total points awarded:00 
Reasons for voting decision: If you look closely at their names, I can infer that both accounts are controlled by the same person. So, I won't vote either way.
Vote Placed by Controverter 4 years ago
Controverter
blueiceswagRedfireswagTied
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Total points awarded:70 
Reasons for voting decision: CVB
Vote Placed by KingDebater 4 years ago
KingDebater
blueiceswagRedfireswagTied
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Total points awarded:00 
Reasons for voting decision: DROPPIN' DA VOTEBOMB!
Vote Placed by imabench 4 years ago
imabench
blueiceswagRedfireswagTied
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Total points awarded:04 
Reasons for voting decision: Plagiarism plus reusing the same arguments over and over
Vote Placed by Walrus101 4 years ago
Walrus101
blueiceswagRedfireswagTied
Agreed with before the debate:--Vote Checkmark0 points
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Total points awarded:05 
Reasons for voting decision: Pro just looped argument over and over. He also plagiarized from the site anon_Y_Mous listed.
Vote Placed by Anon_Y_Mous 4 years ago
Anon_Y_Mous
blueiceswagRedfireswagTied
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Total points awarded:05 
Reasons for voting decision: Conduct goes to Con because pro copied his entire argument from this site: http://www.newsday.com/opinion/columnists/anne-michaud/michaud-less-is-more-when-it-comes-to-homework-1.3920687 Spelling and Grammar goes to Con because the only thing Pro actually typed, his first sentence, had no capitalization or punctuation. Con gets better arguments because his arguments support his side of the debate, unlike Pro's, which support some sort of a middle ground.
Vote Placed by Jhate 4 years ago
Jhate
blueiceswagRedfireswagTied
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Total points awarded:70 
Reasons for voting decision: Con ignored almost everything it seemed like. Con said homework maykes people lazy but showed no evidence. Poor performance by Con. Strengthen your arguments.
Vote Placed by jh1234l 4 years ago
jh1234l
blueiceswagRedfireswagTied
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Total points awarded:04 
Reasons for voting decision: Pro repeated the same arguments over and over again and ignored con's arguments.