The Instigator
tylersch96
Con (against)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
RyozoTabikashi
Pro (for)
Winning
14 Points

is it right for people under 18 to be unsupervised on the internet?

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 4 votes the winner is...
RyozoTabikashi
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 4/25/2012 Category: Miscellaneous
Updated: 5 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 1,602 times Debate No: 23184
Debate Rounds (4)
Comments (5)
Votes (4)

 

tylersch96

Con

First round is the acceptance round.
1. You have to site the information on which you recieved your information.
2. you have to tell personal opinion as well as quotes of individuals over 18 years of age.
may the best debate win. lets go
RyozoTabikashi

Pro

i agree under the impression that i put my opinion and the opinion of others on this supporting the facts
Debate Round No. 1
tylersch96

Con

http://www.webmd.com... states the dangers of the internet
"On the Internet, cyberbullying takes various forms, says Netsmartz411.org, an online resource that educates parents about Internet safety. Cyberbullying includes sending hateful messages or even death threats to children, spreading lies about them online, making nasty comments on their social networking profiles, or creating a website to bash their looks or reputation.

Cyberbullying differs from schoolyard bullying, Handy says. Teachers can't intervene on the Internet. "When it happens online, there's no one to filter it," she says. And cyberbullies don't witness their victims' reactions, the way they might if they insulted others to their faces. "They don't see you crying," Handy says, which may make it easier for them to continue.

Some cyberbullies pose as their victims and send out harassing messages to others. Recently, cyberbullies have also begun posting humiliating videos of other kids they dislike, says Parry Aftab, a cyberspace security and privacy lawyer who also serves as executive director of WiredSafety.org, one of the largest Internet safety education groups in the world.

In the age of YouTube, a website that hosts videos shot by users, "Kids are looking for their 15 megabytes of fame," Aftab says. "They do it to show that they're big enough, popular enough, cool enough to get away with it."

Often, kids don't tell parents they're being cyberbullied; they're afraid their parents will overreact or yank Internet privileges, Aftab adds. Her advice? If your son or daughter tells you, stay calm. If it's a one-time thing, try to ignore the bully and block future contact, she says. But if the cyberbullying involves any physical threat, you may need to call the police."
"The online world opens the door for trusting young people to interact with virtual strangers - even people they'd normally cross the street to avoid in real life. About 1 in 7 kids have been sexually solicited online, says John Shehan, CyberTipline program manager for the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children in Alexandria, Virginia. The CyberTipline helps prevent sexual exploitation of children by reporting cases of kids enticed online to do sexual acts.

While sexual predators have targeted children in chat rooms, they migrate to wherever young people go online, Shehan says. More predators are now scouring social networking sites, such as MySpace and Xanga, because these sites have centralized so much information, Shehan says. A child's profile typically includes photos, personal interests and blogs.

"In terms of predators, that's obviously a hot spot where they can go to research victims," Shehan says. "They need to meet these kids, groom these children and become friends."

Predators may take on fake identities and feign interest in a child's favorite bands, TV shows, video games or hobbies. "They come across to the children as their new best friend. They're going to have the same likes and dislikes," Shehan says. "It's quite crafty what these child predators will go through."."
"One of the worst dangers of the Internet, for many parents, is the idea that pornography could pop up and surprise their children. But parents may not realize that some kids are going online to seek out web porn, too.

You can view the Internet browser history to see which websites your child is visiting, Shehan says. But since kids can delete this history, you may want to install Internet filtering software to block porn sites in the first place.

Software filters aren't a perfect solution; some nasty sites can slip through, while educational or family-rated sites may be blocked. So while some parents may wonder whether monitoring means they're spying on their kids, the safety factor often wins out. "If you get the monitoring software, put it on the computer and forget that it's there," Aftab says. That way, if someone's viewing porn, you'll have the records to deal with it."
"Camera phones, digital cameras and web cams are everywhere these days, and kids can be victims of their own inexperience with new technology. Many post pictures, videos or notes online that they later regret. "Think before you post, because once you do, it's going to be up there forever," Shehan says.

A child's online reputation is a growing concern, Aftab says, with the rise of online social networking and profiles. She cites reports of schools and employers rejecting young people for high school programs, internships, college admissions and jobs after checking out what applicants have posted online.

Many teenage girls put up provocative photos of themselves, Shehan says. Why? Handy - a teenager herself - believes it's a game of one-upmanship. "Kids are trying to look cool. They're doing it because everyone else is doing it. A girl will see a picture and say, 'Oh, I can top that.' And before you know it, she's half-naked on the Internet for everybody to see."."
So time to hear your internet source.
RyozoTabikashi

Pro

1
General Information Regarding Parental Controls
There are so many variations and combinations of computers, operating systems, software, and Internet
Service Providers that it is virtually impossible to provide "one size fits all" instructions for protecting
your family and computer environment. This document was designed to help you search for the right
answers for your individual needs. It provides basic information on some of the most commonly used
software and Internet services. It is not a comprehensive listing of all available resources and is not an
endorsement by the Attorney General of any product or service.
IMPORTANT: None of these parental control practices are foolproof. Kids who want to get
around them CAN find a way to do so, EVEN IF you use all of the parental control software
options. The single most important thing you can do is understand and be involved in your
children's Internet activity. Sit down with them and review any profiles they have created or
visited. Talk to them about their online safety, and teach them to be responsible when they are
online.
Protecting Your Computer
The first level of protection on any computer is through the computer's operating system. The operating
system controls your computer and software.
The two most widely used operating systems are Microsoft Windows and Apple Macintosh.
Windows and Mac each have several versions and releases. There are many options for restricting
access to your individual computer and its software applications via the operating system. For more
information on Microsoft Windows operating systems, visit www.microsoft.com. For Apple Mac, visit
www.apple.com.
Controlling Internet Restrictions Using Your Internet Browser
The next level of protection is to set restrictions in the Internet browser. The browser is the software
from which you view websites. The most commonly used browsers are Internet Explorer, Firefox, and
Safari. Within each browser, there are a variety of ways to "lock down" access to dangerous websites.
• Internet Explorer – This browser is generally pre-installed with Windows-based computers. It
provides secure browsing with Content Advisor. This feature allows parents several options to
approve or deny access to individual websites. You can select websites by category from the
Content Advisor's automatic defaults, or create a custom list of approved websites for your
family's needs. For more information, visit www.microsoft.com.
• Firefox – This browser offers several security filtering options through add-ons. Add-ons are free
mini-applications offered from Mozilla that work to customize and personalize this browser. To
find a filtering add-on that is right for you and your family, visit addons.mozilla.org.
2
• Safari – This Mac-based browser allows parents to control web content, time limits, mail, chat,
and browsing access using separate user accounts. Working in conjunction with the Mac operating
system, user accounts can be set up individually to enable custom parental controls. For more
information, visit www.apple.com.
It is very important that you always use the most current version of your browser, and that you
regularly check for software and security updates.
Internet Service Providers
An Internet Service Provider, or ISP, is a company that offers its customers access to the Internet. There
are many ISPs available for you to choose from. You might want to consider selecting a provider that
offers software with built-in parental controls. Here is a list of three different types of Internet Service
Providers in Idaho that provide built-in controls:
• Cable ONE provides Internet cable service to its customers. A built-in option of this service
called WebStop provides for Internet content filtering, which allows you to control the types of
content your children access online. There is a fee for this service, in addition to your Cable ONE
Internet connection costs. For more information, visit www.cableone.net.
• Qwest High-Speed Internet service provides DSL (Digital Subscriber Line) service to its
customers, and is used in conjunction with Windows Live Family Safety for content filtering. For
more information, visit www.qwest.com.
• America Online (AOL) provides dial-up access to its customers. You can add child accounts
through the Parental Controls options for content filtering, time limit options, and web activity
reports. For more information, visit www.aol.com.
Wireless Internet
A wireless network allows you to connect a mobile device, such as your laptop, to your home network
through a wireless access device. It can be easy to do and is very convenient. However, wireless
connections can cause a potential threat to your home network and your personal information. It is
important that you properly secure your network against unauthorized individuals.
The easiest way to secure your wireless network is to use WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access) or WEP
(Wireless Encryption Protocol) encryption. These forms of encryption scramble the data sent over the
wireless signal and can only be de-scrambled with the correct security key. Without knowing this
security key, it is difficult to use the data being sent wirelessly.
For more information about securing your wireless network, visit the Idaho Internet Crimes Against
Children Task Force at www.icacidaho.org or contact your Internet Service Provider.
Instant Messaging
Instant messaging allows kids to connect online and "chat" with each other using pop-up conversation
windows. Seemingly innocent information can turn into a dangerous situation very quickly if your child
begins to "chat" or instant message (IM) someone they do not know.
3
Most commonly, your children will use the instant messenger that comes packaged with their social
networking website, such as Facebook or MySpace. (For more information on these and other social
networking websites, please read our Parents' Guide to Social Networking Websites manual.) However,
some instant messengers come in the form of free software packages, such as Yahoo!  Messenger and
AOL Instant Messenger (AIM), that can be downloaded and installed to your computer. For this
variety of instant messaging, make sure that your children are using "friend" or "buddy lists," and only
allow them to add family and friends whom they know. These features are designed to help you "lock
out" strangers from your children's instant messages.
Parental Control Software
Regardless of whether your Internet Service Provider has built-in parental control software, you may
wish to look into acquiring additional parental control software. Parental control software can provide
protection against inappropriate websites, whether they are visited by accident or deliberately. Many
packages offer website blocking, content filtering, online time management, instant message and chat
room recording, e-mail monitoring, and much more. Some software downloads are free, while others
are available for purchase, with prices ranging from $0 - $100.00.
Debate Round No. 2
tylersch96

Con

To contradict your reasoning. Yesterday you told me that when you were 9 years old you got mad at the teacher and you crashed the server. Also all you have to do is unplug a few wires and the safety settings would be disabled. From my sources Jessica Goodwin said " there are too many predators disguised as 16 or 17 year old girls or boys"
Your turn.
RyozoTabikashi

Pro

what i said yesterday has nothing to do with my debate, and not all 9 year olds are as smart as me. 2nd, these so called pedafiles, are always eventually caught.
parental controls are a imporant factor in internet usage, u have a few people like me who can get through any firewall, or make their own, but unless you are a computer genius, then parental controls can stop these underage children from getting on the internet.
Debate Round No. 3
tylersch96

Con

but what about pedifiles posting pornographic images? heres a web link for you http://www.youtube.com...
RyozoTabikashi

Pro

again irrelevant to our discussion, and since you can't knock down my argument then i guess i win
Debate Round No. 4
5 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 5 records.
Posted by 1dustpelt 5 years ago
1dustpelt
Content advisor doesn't work anymore, the server has been down since 2008, now it just blocks everything.
Most parental controls block random sites that have nothing bad, for example CNET or Softpedia. That is why I hate them.
Posted by RyozoTabikashi 5 years ago
RyozoTabikashi
how so InVinoVeritas? i am 19 now btw. lol
Posted by InVinoVeritas 5 years ago
InVinoVeritas
"what i said yesterday has nothing to do with my debate, and not all 9 year olds are as smart as me. 2nd, these so called pedafiles [sic], are always eventually caught."

My new favorite DDO quote.
Posted by Zaradi 5 years ago
Zaradi
Oh the contradiction. Unless con has his parents watching him do this debate over his shoulder, he contradicts his own side.
Posted by tylersch96 5 years ago
tylersch96
2nd round internet source 3rd round opinion and other persons opinion
4 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 4 records.
Vote Placed by Mrparkers 5 years ago
Mrparkers
tylersch96RyozoTabikashiTied
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Total points awarded:03 
Reasons for voting decision: Easy win for Pro. All of Con's arguments could be destroyed by asking if any of the problems he presented would vanish once the offenders turned 18. The answer, of course, is no. Adults commit crimes on the internet too, and usually they're far worse than name-calling. Since that wasn't brought up by Pro, I can't vote on that. However, the argument made by Pro wasn't addressed at all by Con, so Pro gets my vote.
Vote Placed by seraine 5 years ago
seraine
tylersch96RyozoTabikashiTied
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Total points awarded:03 
Reasons for voting decision: Con dropped all of his arguments...
Vote Placed by Travniki 5 years ago
Travniki
tylersch96RyozoTabikashiTied
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Total points awarded:04 
Reasons for voting decision: What are you doing con?@?@ YOu were doing so well!
Vote Placed by Microsuck 5 years ago
Microsuck
tylersch96RyozoTabikashiTied
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Total points awarded:04 
Reasons for voting decision: Con dropped all of pro's arguments and his arguments were pointed out to be red herrings.