The Instigator
monkiemoo22
Pro (for)
Losing
6 Points
The Contender
slammin
Con (against)
Winning
15 Points

spaying and neutering should be mandatory until pet population reduced

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Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 5/31/2008 Category: Society
Updated: 8 years ago Status: Voting Period
Viewed: 3,651 times Debate No: 4294
Debate Rounds (3)
Comments (2)
Votes (7)

 

monkiemoo22

Pro

Spaying and neutering should be mandatory because there is an overpopulation of animals all over the U.S. Every time there is a human newborn, 6-7 kittens are born there are millions of healthy cats and kittens put to death each year in U.S. animal shelters because of unaltered cats and not enough homes for their offspring. Some people don't know this, or they don't recognize this is related to themselves or their cats.
Through neutering, you can help your dog and cat live a happier, healthier, and longer life. Spaying eliminates the constant crying and nervous pacing that is a sign that a cat is in heat. Castration stops the mating drive in males, reducing the urge to roam, which in turn, reduces the risk of fights, injury, poisoning, accidents, and contracting diseases. If you have more than one pet in your household, all the pets will get along better if they are neutered.

A long-term benefit of neutering is improved health. Early neutering nearly eliminates breast cancer, and totally prevents uterine infections and uterine and testicular cancer.
tens of thousands of pets get put down each year because there is a great number of surplus animals in the world.

Most people want to let there animal have at least one litter, and have their children experience the wonderful miracle of birth, this shouldn't be done! Even if there is a home already available for the babies, there is many pure bred pets in shelters that need homes and if you don't take the ones already born, then they are going to be put down for a stupid reason, being a surplus pet.

Spaying and neutering should be mandatory until the stray pet population is brought down.
slammin

Con

"Spaying and neutering should be mandatory because there is an overpopulation of animals all over the U.S. Every time there is a human newborn, 6-7 kittens are born there are millions of healthy cats and kittens put to death each year in U.S. animal shelters because of unaltered cats and not enough homes for their offspring. Some people don't know this, or they don't recognize this is related to themselves or their cats."

I agree. People get their pets and then aren't ready for the responsibility and then pretty much release them into their neighborhood and they go off and soon that one cute puppy has become 5 stray dogs. But, there are some drawbacks to making it mandatory to spay or neuter all pets. I will mention them all later on.

"Spaying and neutering should be mandatory until the stray pet population is brought down."

This is a response to not only this statement but all the rest you have provided.

Drawbacks of Making Spaying and Neutering Mandatory:

1. Some people choose to breed their animals.
2. Many people cannot afford to spay or neuter their pets. The effects of this will be explained later.
3. How can you assure that all cats and dogs will be spayed or neutered? Like you said, there are several stray animals, and who's to say that a company (that can pay for all expenses of catching the dogs and cats AND spaying them) would round up all the stray dogs and cats and attempt to neuter them all? This idea seems improbable.
4. Spaying is major surgery. The majority of pets recover without complications, but they need special care in the weeks following their operation. There is always a risk involved with putting an animal through this kind of surgery.
5. Spaying or neutering disqualifies many pedigreed dogs/cats from the show ring.
6. Some neutered dogs can become fat because of the lack of hormones. A special diet will easily correct this but the food can be costly. (Once again, those with financial problems wouldn't be able to keep the dog.) Even though this is rare, there is still a possibility that this could happen.
7. If you neuter before your pet has reached full size, some muscle definition and size may be lost because the hormone testosterone is not there. Sure, this may not be important, but to those who want their dogs to compete in shows, this is a major negative result of neutering.

Results of Not Being Able to Afford This:
1. Less pets will be adopted due to the high cost.
2. Pets that people already have may be abandoned due to their burden of not being able to pay.

I do agree with you on the need of something to be done with the growing stray pets population, and that pets should be spayed/neutered. However, this shouldn't be mandatory, as there are flaws in the idea. Thank you very much for starting this debate and I await your response!

~Slammin
Debate Round No. 1
monkiemoo22

Pro

Compared with traditional-age gonadectomy, pre pubertal gonadectomy did not result in an increased incidence of infectious disease, behavioral problems, or problems associated with any body system during a median follow-up period of 37 months. Additionally, the rate of retention in the original adoptive household was the same for cats that underwent pre pubertal gonadectomy as those that underwent traditional-age gonadectomy.
The ideal age for neutering our companion animal friends is 8-16 weeks.
Prepubertal neutering has been ‘controversial' for years. Because of this controversy, a lot of
academic research, independent studies and anecdotal evidence has accumulated.
The Humane Society in Medford Oregon decided back in 1974 to spay/neuter all
their dogs and cats prior to adoption. Why? They realized that many pets adopted from their
shelter produced offspring that eventually came back to them, repeating a never-ending
cycle. In 1987, Dr. Leo Lieberman truly set the spark for the prepubertal controversy by
publishing "A Case for Neutering Pups and Kittens at 2 months of Age." While Medford
Oregon is given credit as the modern birthplace for prepubertal neutering, Dr. Lieberman is
considered the father of prepubertal neutering by many. There are numerous universities that
should be given credit for adding science to a common sense solution, for addressing pet
overpopulation. The University of Florida conducted the first truly controlled study in 1991
comparing neutering at 7 weeks vs. 7 months of age. Texas A&M and the University of
Florida have looked at urethral diameters in prepubertal vs. conventionally neutered animals.
The University of Colorado has provided very useful anesthetic protocols and the University
of Minnesota has reviewed the literature extensively with regard to prepubertal neutering.
The nineties produced a lot of data with which to move forward. Just as the scientific
literature has grown, so has the anecdotal information coming from humane societies, private
veterinary practices, spay/neuter clinics and owners of pets neutered prepubertally.
Even with all our efforts, we still get 30-60% of adopting owners not abiding by
their spay/neuter contracts. With humane societies supplying about 20-25% of companion
animals to households each year, humane organizations quickly become major contributors to
pet overpopulation. Prepubertal neutering becomes an important tool against pet
overpopulation. Considering the following:
• No puppy or kitten should be adopted prior to 8 wks, of age
• 8-12 wks is the ideal age for placing pets into households
• Sterilized pets can never reproduce
Fully 85% of cats and 70% of dogs in households today have been neutered. Unfortunately,
about 20% of companion animals produce at least one litter prior to being sterilized. We, as
humane organizations, cannot demand better sterilization compliance by the public, if we are
still having our own sterilization compliance issues.
The number one cause of death for dogs and cats remains euthanasia. With 70
million dogs, 75 million pet cats and countless millions of feral cats, our job remains an uphill
battle. After decades of effort, the realization that overpopulation of companion animals is
still a major problem for humane organizations can seem depressing. The realization that we
have cut euthanasia rates by millions of companion animals each year, gives us hope as we
look to the future.
There are 3 primary areas that need to be explored to expand prepubertal
neutering and further drop companion animal euthanasia rates. How the veterinary
profession and humane organizations have dealt with prepubertal neutering are two. This
nations horrendous feral cat issue is the third.
1. The veterinary profession has for decades made 6-8 months the recommended
age for neutering. There is no scientific reason for this age selection; it has simply become a
‘tradition.' The conservative nature of the veterinary profession has made change hard. We
must demand from any veterinarian we support, that they embrace prepubertal neutering as
the standard. We must be willing to educate our veterinary friends and boycott those who are
not part of the solution. Their own national organization (AVMA) has endorsed the practice
of prepubertal neutering since 1993.
2. Humane organizations have placed too much emphasis on the warehousing of
animals and not enough emphasis on education, behavioral counseling, and neutering
programs. While many groups have embraced prepubertal neutering, a large number will still
adopt animals prior to sterilization. With dogs being 15x and cats 45x more prolific than
humans, it becomes very clear we are helping to create the very problem we are working to
solve. The public must demand that 100% of adopted animals be sterilized and that more
money be put into educational and neutering campaigns. It is totally unethical for us to call
ourselves a humane movement when we use euthanasia as the cornerstone for controlling
companion animal overpopulation. Having said that, I will also say there are things far worse
than death.
3. In reference to our feline friends, only about 20% of owned cats reproduce
before being sterilized. In contrast, 75% of feral/stray cats are either in heat, pregnant or
lactating most of the year. We truly must put more emphasis and money into feral/stray cat
programs. The huge numbers of feral/stray cats provide an endless supply of furry feline
friends for euthanasia and worse. People don't adopt cats; cats adopt people. Averaging 2.1
litters per year and 4.25 kittens per litter, numbers add up. Even knowing 40% of kittens will
die in the first 2 months of life, and 60-80% by sexual maturity (5 months) the numbers are
still staggering and the carnage unrelenting. Felis, Domesticus is a domesticated species that
has much healthier, longer lives when treated as a true companion animal friend.
After over 20 years of endless discussion about neutering and millions of
companion animals being euthanized, it is time to stop the back door approach to animal
control. We must ensure that 100% of adopted pets are sterilized, we must increase public
education and we must have active neutering programs, with special emphasis on feral/stray
cats.
Prepubertal neutering is a very useful tool in the fight to control pet
overpopulation. Over the last few decades, much has been revealed about the medical aspects
of prepubertal neutering. Many concerns have been raised, and many concerns have been
addressed while the euthanasia has never stopped. The major areas of concern have been
about behavior, obesity issues, skeletal growth problems, urinary tract issues, and
anesthetic/surgical protocols.
1. Behavior represents a complex interaction between genetics and environment.
Breed is a major factor in behavior with companion animals. Neutering in general reduces
roaming, (>90%), reduces inter male aggression (>60%), reduces urine marking (>50%),
extends life, (1-3 yrs dogs, 3-5 yrs cats) and makes for a better companion animal in general.
Prepubertal neutering maximizes all these benefits. About 50% of surrendered animals are
unaltered at the time of relinquishment, about 80% of hit by car dogs and dog fight victims
are intact males. It should be clear that an intact male dog represents a threat to himself and
to other dogs. As dogs and cats mature, it's the hormones of puberty that precipitate many
behavioral issues. By removing the source of these hormones we can modulate negative
behavior much more easily.
2. Obesity is primarily affected by diet, activity level and age. Neutered females are
2x more likely to be obese, but they live longer and tend to have more pampered lives. It
should be noted that neutered animals in general require about 30% less calories. It can also be
noted that many Iditarod dogs are sterilized and not fat at all. Obesity is a problem in
slammin

Con

I would like to make a point and say that pet owners have the full responsibility of taking care of their pets (feeding, grooming, washing, etc), and therefore, the caretaker should be allowed to determine what they want to do with their pet(s).

They are the ones assuming responsibility, like parents would be taking care of a young child. The parents get to decide what happens to their child because they have the authority to, much like pet owners.

Requiring that all pets must be spayed or neutered results in mostly mixed breeds of dogs and cats. All purebred breeders would run out of work since they would not be able to breed the dogs or cats. Also, as we pointed out before, a large percentage of pet owners would not be able to afford the operation, resulting in fewer dog/cat adoptions. What happens once the pet population does reduce? I don't think that the pet population is as big of a deal as the stray pet population. I mean who cares how many pets there are in the US as long as they are taken care of and loved. We need to work with those people who just abandon their pets after getting them because of the huge and unexpected responsibility. I am not going to reply to any of your points/ facts made until you do two things: provide a source for that information and rebut the flaws I have pointed out.

"Obesity is a problem in"

What's the rest of that statement? Uhm, I think you forgot to copy one part. I believe that my opponent just copied and pasted facts from uncited websites and did not respond to ANY of our points.

I would like to point out that the flaws that we mentioned weren't responded to, so they are still valid points until you disprove them. Therefore your argument is invalid since you have yet to respond to the flaws we pointed out. Thank you and I await your response.
Debate Round No. 2
monkiemoo22

Pro

monkiemoo22 forfeited this round.
slammin

Con

slammin forfeited this round.
Debate Round No. 3
2 comments have been posted on this debate. Showing 1 through 2 records.
Posted by mmadderom 8 years ago
mmadderom
Pro's entire second argument was nothing but a cut and paste from some humane organization. That's called plagiarism, not debate.
Posted by bexy_kelly 8 years ago
bexy_kelly
I'm very tempted to take this. But I don't have alot of time so I wont bother....

"Through neutering, you can help your dog and cat live a happier, healthier, and longer life"

I would just like to state this is not always the case, as my friends were warned agaisnt neutering their dog because it would turn into a brain-dead fluffy lump which would simply lie about the house all day in daze.

And would we want that?
7 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 7 records.
Vote Placed by lannan13 5 years ago
lannan13
monkiemoo22slamminTied
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Vote Placed by Im_always_right 8 years ago
Im_always_right
monkiemoo22slamminTied
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Vote Placed by mmadderom 8 years ago
mmadderom
monkiemoo22slamminTied
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Logical-Master
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