The Instigator
jedieglet
Pro (for)
Losing
0 Points
The Contender
WhoWouldnt
Con (against)
Winning
21 Points

we should be able to wear the confederate flag to school

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Post Voting Period
The voting period for this debate has ended.
after 4 votes the winner is...
WhoWouldnt
Voting Style: Open Point System: 7 Point
Started: 2/19/2014 Category: Education
Updated: 3 years ago Status: Post Voting Period
Viewed: 630 times Debate No: 46282
Debate Rounds (2)
Comments (1)
Votes (4)

 

jedieglet

Pro

i think that the confederate flag should be allowed to wear in schools because it would be against our rights.
WhoWouldnt

Con

As a way to challenge myself I've decided to take up the con side of this debate despite the fact that I have no problem with people wearing something to express themselves during school; however, for the sake of debate and in the spirit of competition: challenge accepted!

I look forward to your argument. Keep in mind the burden of proof is on you.
Debate Round No. 1
jedieglet

Pro

thanks for excepting my debate. i think we should be allowed to wear the confederate flag because it would be expressing ourselves. its says in our first amendment rights that we have the freedom of speech. this includes the freedom of expression which is also a form of speech. to some people the confederate flag is a sigh of insubordination of the U.S. if i could i would wear it to school because i think that the south was right to separate because Lincoln was making them get rid of slavey, but Lincoln told them they could not separate and had the army march to the south to "free slaves" that was just on there side missions it was mostly to get the south to come back to the union. so i believe that we should be able to wear it and thanks again for challenging this.
WhoWouldnt

Con

I would like to thank my opponent for his response and wish him luck in the voting process.

Freedom of Speech isn't necessarily Free:


While it is true that we have freedom of speech, it is also true that that freedom can cause us to lose our freedom. Freedom of speech/expression isn't free at all. If I say "I swear that before my dying breath I'm going to kill my neighbor," directly or indirectly around an officer of the law and/or I am deemed a reasonable threat to my neighbor through my expression by a officer of the law (sometimes by a subjectively scrutnized argument) then I could end up in jail (losing my freedom).

Now certainly my opponent isn't suggesting that people don't pay the price for their "freedom of speech." The point here is that he does have the ability to wear the confederate flag to school, he just might be punished for it.

According to BusinessInsider.com people (mostly teenage kids) have been arrested from posting things on Facebook. This seems like a freedom of expression that takes place (and not even in the context of the rules of a educational institution), but it ended up putting several in jail for the things they expressed. [1]

Going to school is like any other societal agreement...:

When you are enrolled in school, there are rules that govern that particular institution. As a student, you are agreeing to adhere to those rules and have the option (or your parents have the option) to opt out of that school. As someone who wishes to wear things that are against the dress code, you're contending that you do not think the rules apply to you or that the rules need to be changed for all the students (imagine the floodgate that could open by allowing something like a rebellious flag or a hemp plant as a symbol to someone's freedom of expression during school and the distractions it could cause).

So how do you expect to decide what is allowed in school and what is not allowed in school. I would guess that there is a governing body of the school district (for public schools) and a board of some kind for most educational entities that make such policies in the interest of the entire student body. Perhaps you should seek to make a case with them. Until then, you are under those rules and therefore enforcement for breaking any of those rules.

While you may not like it, these rules are set in the interest of the school's image, the student body, the parents, the teachers, and the administrators. While it may seem like freedom of expression to you to wear a confederate flag on your shirt to school, you are part of the school community and that means as long as the rules are set and you agree to go, then you are agreeing to abide by the rules set by that school (not allowing confederate flags and all).

What you wear expresses you:

According to Ben C. Fletcher D. Phil at psychologytoday.com, what we wear makes a statement about us. It sends signals to other people about what kind of person we are and what things we wish to represent us. [2]

I wonder if my opponent has considered allowing pornographic images on clothing, swastikas, gang images, or other controversial items onto clothing allowed in schools? What my opponent wishes to do is wear an image that many associate with a bloody time in America's history that turned family members against each other. Is this the message they wish to convey? Also, this flag is seen by many as a symbol that expresses racial oppression, since the Confederate States of America wanted to keep slaves (mostly of African descent). Is this the message they wish to convey? Even if they do not, the message could still be sent to other students that may not like the message.

The Confederate Flag may increase hostility in the African-American student body and could lead to harm in the schools, some court systems may find this leading to potential harm and disruption in the classroom. For schools, it should be a place of learning in an environment fit for all students (or at least the best environment we can hope to build). Does this freedom of expression have a necessity during school hours? Couldn't/Wouldn't it be a better time for this expression on a political stand, rally, or amongst people in more private locations, or local areas?

In the interest of the school, controversial images and symbols probably should be something considered by the board and administrators of each school. Obviously, the best practical decision should be reached where there is a balance of allowing for individual freedom while protecting other individuals while on their quest for knowledge.

Sources:

1. http://www.businessinsider.com...

2.http://www.psychologytoday.com...
Debate Round No. 2
1 comment has been posted on this debate.
Posted by WhoWouldnt 3 years ago
WhoWouldnt
@ILL_logic - I think your vote was a GROSS misrepresentation of my argument. I never stated what the Confederate flag did or did not mean, I simply stated that "many associate [the confederate flag] with a bloody time in America's history that turned family members against each other....Also, this flag is seen by many as a symbol that expresses racial oppression, since the Confederate States of America wanted to keep slaves (mostly of African descent)."

I just said "many people" (that doesn't even mean most) see the Confederate flag that way.

I never said that this is the true meaning of that particular flag nor that all people understood that it was a certain way. I definitely could have used sources to back up the information, but I didn't feel I needed it for this particular argument.
4 votes have been placed for this debate. Showing 1 through 4 records.
Vote Placed by Krazzy_Player 3 years ago
Krazzy_Player
jediegletWhoWouldntTied
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Total points awarded:03 
Reasons for voting decision: Better arguments by Con.
Vote Placed by Wylted 3 years ago
Wylted
jediegletWhoWouldntTied
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Total points awarded:06 
Reasons for voting decision: Pro did not use capitals letters or periods on the end of his sentences. S&G to con. Con also used sources. So, points for that. Arguments to con. Con made better points.
Vote Placed by Seeginomikata 3 years ago
Seeginomikata
jediegletWhoWouldntTied
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Total points awarded:06 
Reasons for voting decision: Pro argument fraught with grammatical and semantic errors. Pro argument invalidated by con arguments, con used sources, pro did not source any assertions.
Vote Placed by kbub 3 years ago
kbub
jediegletWhoWouldntTied
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Total points awarded:06 
Reasons for voting decision: Like Con's argument says, it's like any other dress code in the understood social agreement. Con points out the potential harms of allowing this, while Pro does not. Con has sources, and stronger arguments. Pro consistently does not capitalize, which would be fine if Pro gave a reason for doing so, but s/he doesn't.