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Steppenwolf

Ren
Posts: 7,102
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8/15/2012 6:20:34 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
So, I've been reading Steppenwolf.

Has anyone else read this? I'm really touched by this book. It's pretty amazing... but, like, it kind of starts 100 pages in.

But, you can't really skip the first 100 pages and still understand it. It's probably just a mood thing... I was looking for prose, and was given poetry for half the book...

...in any case, it's getting really good. I'm like, madly in love with Hermine. I'd be just like Harry in response to her.
NixonianVolkswagen
Posts: 481
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8/17/2012 2:58:45 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
I haven't, but you've intrigued me. Is there a good English translation?

Or was this a suave way of reminding us all that you're polylingual?
"There is an almost universal tendency, perhaps an inborn tendency, to suspect the good faith of a man who holds opinions that differ from our own opinions."

- Karl "Spartacus" Popper
Korashk
Posts: 4,597
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8/17/2012 3:20:54 AM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 8/17/2012 3:09:29 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:


This is what I came here for.
When large numbers of otherwise-law abiding people break specific laws en masse, it's usually a fault that lies with the law. - Unknown
Ren
Posts: 7,102
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8/17/2012 2:32:55 PM
Posted: 4 years ago
At 8/17/2012 2:58:45 AM, NixonianVolkswagen wrote:
I haven't, but you've intrigued me. Is there a good English translation?

Or was this a suave way of reminding us all that you're polylingual?

Hehe, you flatter me...

...I fully endorse the translation released by Bantam Books by Basil Creighton (updated by Joseph Mileck with suggestions from Horst Frenz).

I mean... just look at this gem:

"Has she shown you this?" asked Hermine on one occasion, describing to me a peculiar play of the tongue in kissing. I asked her to show it me herself, but she was most earnest in her refusal. "That is for later. I am not your love yet."

Hermann Hesse is brilliant. The astounding delicacy with which he writes...

"She had the scent and very significance of summer and roses."

...It's what Hemmingway could have only dreamed of achieving, in all his boring diatribes.

I'm going to read Gertrude next.

I really hope that someone strolls by that could parley with me about this book, though; it's quite a read and equally worth discussion.