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Juan_Pablo's Sci Fi

Juan_Pablo
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2/19/2014 6:07:22 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
As I posted on Jake212's thread I have two novel-sized story ideas, the first being a sci-fi story and the second taking the form of an anime ( but written as a novel nonetheless ).

The first story:

Theme: Nature versus Paradise

( My stories tend to be deeply philosophical, because I think these kinds of stories stir discussion. But there are always powerful emotional elements in my stories, too, to keep the reader interested and to make the story as believable as possible - even though the subject is science fiction. )

This one takes place approximately 300 to 500 years in the future, inside of an enormous space vessel, which is loaded with life-support systems and the necessary technology to keep tens of thousands of people alive, though in the story there are about 120 people onboard the ship, between the ages of 3 and 26. There's an enormous back story to the plot that slowly gets revealed during the story, and you discover that the enormous ship is stranded in space and is stuck in orbit around an enormous gray planet which the ship's inhabitants call "Nucleus". When the ship departed from Earth some 70 years earlier during a great extinction event ( I'm thinking a colossal asteroid ), the engines malfunctioned and the ship ended up drifting in space, eventually passing through a star system and falling into orbit around "Nucleus".

The ship was one of hundreds of ships that left Earth. None of the other ships appeared to malfunction. Earth was destroyed.

The ship served as a kind of Noah's Ark, and had libraries, a kind of onboard zoo, and had tens of thousands of human inhabitants, none of which were allowed to reproduce to stabilize the population in the ship ( the men and women were given a chemical to keep them infertile ). Artificial gravity was provided to every level of the ship through the artificial gravity plant at the base of the ship.

300 years earlier, humankind also entered a great period of philosophical enlightenment, where world peace was established and world government's implemented programs to create "paradise" on Earth - essentially "Heaven". This means that humans gave up natural trophism ( the ingestion of plant and animal-based food material for sustenance ) and invented processes where essential chemicals found in food material could be synthesized in factories ( which were called "conversion factories" ). Animals kept in zoos were also gradually prepared for this kind of trophic lifestyle.

The ship had a conversion factory, which could covert raw material from an asteroid - or even better - a nearby planet into a very nutritious "slop" ( of varying consistencies and textures ) that could "wean even the most malnourished person back to health".

The planetary gas and soil is scooped up in a remote-piloted small craft that returns to the ship and dumps the material onto a conveyor, which sends it to the conversion factory for the synthesis of organic food material for the humans and animals.
Juan_Pablo
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2/19/2014 6:09:13 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
The first story ( continued ):

Anyway, you discover that the 120 inhabitants of the ship ( incapable of propulsion ) are clones of the last 120 human survivors. Every human on board the ship died and were not capable of natural reproduction because of the chemical that was initially provided to them. The last 120 human survivors, seeing that the ship's entire purpose was meaningless, decided to clone themselves in a makeshift laboratory ( they were quite smart ) in hopes that one day the clones and the ship would be rediscovered by the other humans that left Earth 50 - 70 years earlier.

When the story begins, the original human inhabitants are all dead; only the clones remain. The originally human inhabitants are fondly mentioned by the clones during the story, however.

Anyway, when the story begins you discover that the second oldest male clone carries the label "Chief Overseer", which is something identical to a President, and there are other clones of varying age ( mostly in their very late teens, early twenties ) serving in positions of government ( judges, political assistants ). You also discover that the oldest clone is by far the smartest and he had the most years of experience dealing with that last humans aboard the ship, who were very smart. He is looked-up to by many of the other clones in the story because of his incredible intellect and because of his engineering prowess ( he knows what to do when the ship is in trouble ). But there's something strange with him because you discover that he is incarcerated in one of the rooms at the bottom of the ship, and his room is constantly guarded by two teenage "prison guards".

His story is by far the most interesting . . .
Juan_Pablo
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2/19/2014 6:10:28 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
The first story ( continued ):

Anyway, the oldest clone - a male, age 26 - was previously the Chief Overseer of the ship's inhabitants, being that he was the oldest and the smartest; he was also made in charge by the final humans before they died, so as to keep watch over the younger human clones.

But the 26-year old clone was obsessed with the great mystery of Earth, which he never got to see. He was obsessed and entertained by so many of the human ways and so much of the "old ways" that he was told about and read about in books, and watched in videos. He was infatuated with "Nature". One day, after watching a video documentary about animals in the "old" nature, he did something ignominious ( quite perverse ) - he took one of the youngest clones, which he was trusted to watch over, struck him in the head with an object and ate pieces of him! The body of the dead child was discovered, and only for a couple of days was he able to hide the actual events of the child's death. But eventually he was discovered. He was convicted by a court of fellow clones and sentenced to "life imprisonment" at the base of the ship! The second oldest clone was immediately elected to take his place.

The story begins two years after this event.
Juan_Pablo
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2/19/2014 6:16:37 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Anyway, I wont give any more away, only to say that the first part of the story is about relationships and about the culture on the ship, about the technology, about the great philosophical enlightenment that the clones adhere to and which developed on Earth.

The second part of the novel is about a conflict between philosophies: between the utopian philosophy that virtually all the human clones adhere to and the naturalist philosophy the oldest clone and a few others in his circle secretly subscribe to. It basically becomes a philosophical battle between a utopian view of things and a naturalist view of things, and this comes to a head in the second part of the story, when carnivorous aliens from the planet "Nucleus" manage to get into the ship in a very creative way. Things get nuts and the humans clones are suddenly confronted by the crude behavior of the "old nature" they only read about in books - only they're the prey and the aliens are the meat-eating predators!

In the excitement, many fantastic events happen, and the oldest clone is liberated from his "cell" in the bottom of the ship by a few of his philosophical admirers; he then makes a political power-play, where he temporarily overthrows the government of the second oldest clone! Let's just say things get wild.
Oromagi
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2/19/2014 8:48:28 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/19/2014 8:16:29 PM, Juan_Pablo wrote:
So what do you guys think about my first story idea?

I like the setting very much: this is one of my favorite sci-fi tropes although I find it interesting that so many generation ships go awry of their mission or are forgotten by humanity. I had a similar idea about a generation ship that arrives at a distant solar system with bountiful terraforming opportunities only to discover that humanity has innovated jump technology by creating gates of flash singularities and colonized the system in the interim centuries. The colonies have since been to war with Earth. The fleet they launched never returned, so the colony assumes that the gate or Earth or both were destroyed, but fears a return of Earth. The colony ship arrives completely out of context and has no idea where to place their loyalties.

What was the fate of many other generation ships? Is this the last of humanity or is that unknown?

Are the alien invaders intelligent? Is this the first intelligent life met by mankind? Is this the alien race's first encounter?
Oromagi
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2/19/2014 8:50:21 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/19/2014 8:16:29 PM, Juan_Pablo wrote:
So what do you guys think about my first story idea?

If clones are commonplace, why imprison the protagonist? Would the clones prefer to clone the President and his vital role and destroy the perverse copy?
bubbatheclown
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2/19/2014 8:52:01 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
I think your story raises a certain point: when we grow civilized, we are in some ways at a disadvantage to barbarians who follow the natural order.

For instance (here's an idea I toyed with a little bit), imagine that there's an apocalyptic event and somehow there is a single man and a single woman who survive. They quickly come in contact with each other and band together for survival. The man wants to repopulate the Earth. The woman would be cool with it, if she didn't have to be the one who gave birth to the next generation of humans. You see, she is a liberated woman. She sees herself as equal to any man, and rightfully so, She doesn't want to have to get pregnant and go through the difficult process of childbirth. And rightfully so.

From a moral standpoint, it would be wrong to force her to be the mother of the restarted human race. That much is clear. However, when you get down to the issue, these are desperate times. For the survival of the human race, the man and the woman must resort back to the unjust natural order, which will oppress the woman and take away the freedoms granted to her by civilization.

Do you understand what I'm saying?
Juan_Pablo
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2/19/2014 8:55:23 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/19/2014 8:48:28 PM, Oromagi wrote:
At 2/19/2014 8:16:29 PM, Juan_Pablo wrote:
So what do you guys think about my first story idea?

I like the setting very much: this is one of my favorite sci-fi tropes although I find it interesting that so many generation ships go awry of their mission or are forgotten by humanity. I had a similar idea about a generation ship that arrives at a distant solar system with bountiful terraforming opportunities only to discover that humanity has innovated jump technology by creating gates of flash singularities and colonized the system in the interim centuries. The colonies have since been to war with Earth. The fleet they launched never returned, so the colony assumes that the gate or Earth or both were destroyed, but fears a return of Earth. The colony ship arrives completely out of context and has no idea where to place their loyalties.

What was the fate of many other generation ships? Is this the last of humanity or is that unknown?

The other huge ships don't malfunction. I answer their whereabouts in the story.

Are the alien invaders intelligent? Is this the first intelligent life met by mankind? Is this the alien race's first encounter?

No. The aliens aren't intelligent like humans. How the aliens get onboard the ship and how they traverse the dark expanse of space is answered in the story. They're not a technologically advanced species. They're quadripeds but are capable of standing on their hind legs.
Juan_Pablo
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2/19/2014 8:58:08 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/19/2014 8:50:21 PM, Oromagi wrote:
At 2/19/2014 8:16:29 PM, Juan_Pablo wrote:
So what do you guys think about my first story idea?

If clones are commonplace, why imprison the protagonist? Would the clones prefer to clone the President and his vital role and destroy the perverse copy?

Orogami, each clone is a clone of a human that died off in the original generation that left Earth.

The clones aren't clones of each other. They're physically unique individuals.
Oromagi
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2/19/2014 9:00:54 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Orogami, each clone is a clone of a human that died off in the original generation that left Earth.

The clones aren't clones of each other. They're physically unique individuals.

Isn't that a contradiction? Are they copies of the original settlers or are they mixing and matching DNA? I think u mean the latter.
Oromagi
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2/19/2014 9:04:35 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
I always enjoy stories where idealism is challenged by the wood-chipper of Naturalism. Particularly when idealism adapts and improves rather than dissolves.
Juan_Pablo
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2/19/2014 9:21:53 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/19/2014 9:00:54 PM, Oromagi wrote:
Orogami, each clone is a clone of a human that died off in the original generation that left Earth.

The clones aren't clones of each other. They're physically unique individuals.

Isn't that a contradiction? Are they copies of the original settlers or are they mixing and matching DNA? I think u mean the latter.

The clones are actually copies of the original humans that died on the ship. In the story I don't mix and match their DNA. The reason why I have it this way is because it's done as a kind of wish fulfillment for the last 120 human survivors, who knew they would die from old age. So the clones represent a kind of extension of life for them, and extension of hope that one day that would be reunited with the rest of human civilization.

Also, the reason why the oldest clone is sentenced to "life imprisonment" rather than killed is because the clones adhere to a utopian philosophy that they inherented from the humans. They know that the oldest clone did something wrong by killing a child, but they acknowledge that he has rights so they sentence him to life imprisonment rather than to be executed.
Juan_Pablo
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2/19/2014 9:23:36 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/19/2014 9:04:35 PM, Oromagi wrote:
I always enjoy stories where idealism is challenged by the wood-chipper of Naturalism. Particularly when idealism adapts and improves rather than dissolves.

LOL. Yup. So do I!

One of the reasons why I constructed the story in the first place is because I believe that humans can do better than the natural world that created them. I guess some would call this naive. But it's something I do believe humans are capable of.
Juan_Pablo
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2/19/2014 9:26:45 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/19/2014 8:52:01 PM, bubbatheclown wrote:
I think your story raises a certain point: when we grow civilized, we are in some ways at a disadvantage to barbarians who follow the natural order.

For instance (here's an idea I toyed with a little bit), imagine that there's an apocalyptic event and somehow there is a single man and a single woman who survive. They quickly come in contact with each other and band together for survival. The man wants to repopulate the Earth. The woman would be cool with it, if she didn't have to be the one who gave birth to the next generation of humans. You see, she is a liberated woman. She sees herself as equal to any man, and rightfully so, She doesn't want to have to get pregnant and go through the difficult process of childbirth. And rightfully so.

From a moral standpoint, it would be wrong to force her to be the mother of the restarted human race. That much is clear. However, when you get down to the issue, these are desperate times. For the survival of the human race, the man and the woman must resort back to the unjust natural order, which will oppress the woman and take away the freedoms granted to her by civilization.

Do you understand what I'm saying?

Yeah, I do see the point you're making. I think that the woman would recognize the situation and at some point would decide to bear the man's child(ren) simply to commence with the repopulation of Earth.
Juan_Pablo
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2/20/2014 12:08:57 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
To reiterate, the age range of the ship's inhabitants ( the clones ) when the story begins is 3 to 26.

The second oldest clone ( the leader ) is 23.

The average age of the inhabitants is 15.

Everyone 13 and up is given an assignment on the ship, to optimize survival and maximize the comfort of the crew.
bubbatheclown
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2/21/2014 7:20:13 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/20/2014 12:08:57 PM, Juan_Pablo wrote:
To reiterate, the age range of the ship's inhabitants ( the clones ) when the story begins is 3 to 26.

The second oldest clone ( the leader ) is 23.

The average age of the inhabitants is 15.

Everyone 13 and up is given an assignment on the ship, to optimize survival and maximize the comfort of the crew.

Uh, aren't you going to tell us about your other stories?
Juan_Pablo
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2/21/2014 7:23:09 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/21/2014 7:20:13 PM, bubbatheclown wrote:
At 2/20/2014 12:08:57 PM, Juan_Pablo wrote:
To reiterate, the age range of the ship's inhabitants ( the clones ) when the story begins is 3 to 26.

The second oldest clone ( the leader ) is 23.

The average age of the inhabitants is 15.

Everyone 13 and up is given an assignment on the ship, to optimize survival and maximize the comfort of the crew.

Uh, aren't you going to tell us about your other stories?

Yes, Bubba! Thanks for reminding me. I'll do this in a little bit.
Juan_Pablo
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2/21/2014 10:32:19 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/21/2014 7:23:09 PM, Juan_Pablo wrote:
At 2/21/2014 7:20:13 PM, bubbatheclown wrote:
At 2/20/2014 12:08:57 PM, Juan_Pablo wrote:
To reiterate, the age range of the ship's inhabitants ( the clones ) when the story begins is 3 to 26.

The second oldest clone ( the leader ) is 23.

The average age of the inhabitants is 15.

Everyone 13 and up is given an assignment on the ship, to optimize survival and maximize the comfort of the crew.

Uh, aren't you going to tell us about your other stories?

Yes, Bubba! Thanks for reminding me. I'll do this in a little bit.

I'll post my second story idea within the hour. Unlike the first, this story actually does have a name ( I'm still not sure about the title of the first, but it's going to include the word "cradle" - as in a baby's cradle. )

The title of the second novel idea is A Priori, and it will take the form of an anime.
Juan_Pablo
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2/21/2014 10:38:17 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
a pri-o-ri

Latin for "relating to what can be known through an understanding of how certain things work rather than by observation" or "relating to or derived by reasoning from self-evident propositions".

from Merriam-Webster's dictionary.
Juan_Pablo
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2/21/2014 11:12:02 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
a pri-o-ri

Theme(s): Man's quest for meaning. Man versus the will of God.

The story begins in 1347 C.E. (A.D.), one year before the Black Plague ravages the medieval city of Florence and goes on to kill 25 to 50% of the population of Europe in the following decades.

It revolves around a 12-year old thief-for-hire - Emilio Alghieri - who conceals his face with a white party mask consisting of a long gnarled nose during his working assignments. He goes by the alias "the Chameleon" and is only known by this name to his employers. Both on assignment and as a pauper he wears typical clothing for his status in this era: a tunic, long tight pantaloons to cover his legs, and lengthy, moss-stuffed poulaines ( leather shoes with long, flaccid tips ).

He works as a thief to support his mother and younger sister, who are also paupers. His father is either deceased or his whereabouts unknown ( he is unimportant and does not make an appearance in the story ). While waiting for employment, he waits in a favorite, unused alleyway.

One morning, while waiting for work, his back resting against the wall, he's approached by a lady in a black elegant dress, denoting privilege . . . her face hidden by a cowl . . . . .
bubbatheclown
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2/22/2014 7:52:40 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/21/2014 11:12:02 PM, Juan_Pablo wrote:
a pri-o-ri

Theme(s): Man's quest for meaning. Man versus the will of God.

The story begins in 1347 C.E. (A.D.), one year before the Black Plague ravages the medieval city of Florence and goes on to kill 25 to 50% of the population of Europe in the following decades.

It revolves around a 12-year old thief-for-hire - Emilio Alghieri - who conceals his face with a white party mask consisting of a long gnarled nose during his working assignments. He goes by the alias "the Chameleon" and is only known by this name to his employers. Both on assignment and as a pauper he wears typical clothing for his status in this era: a tunic, long tight pantaloons to cover his legs, and lengthy, moss-stuffed poulaines ( leather shoes with long, flaccid tips ).

He works as a thief to support his mother and younger sister, who are also paupers. His father is either deceased or his whereabouts unknown ( he is unimportant and does not make an appearance in the story ). While waiting for employment, he waits in a favorite, unused alleyway.

One morning, while waiting for work, his back resting against the wall, he's approached by a lady in a black elegant dress, denoting privilege . . . her face hidden by a cowl . . . . .

I can smell an Assassins Creed ripoff...
Anyway, continue.
Juan_Pablo
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2/22/2014 10:34:19 AM
Posted: 2 years ago
At 2/22/2014 7:52:40 AM, bubbatheclown wrote:
At 2/21/2014 11:12:02 PM, Juan_Pablo wrote:
a pri-o-ri

Theme(s): Man's quest for meaning. Man versus the will of God.

The story begins in 1347 C.E. (A.D.), one year before the Black Plague ravages the medieval city of Florence and goes on to kill 25 to 50% of the population of Europe in the following decades.

It revolves around a 12-year old thief-for-hire - Emilio Alghieri - who conceals his face with a white party mask consisting of a long gnarled nose during his working assignments. He goes by the alias "the Chameleon" and is only known by this name to his employers. Both on assignment and as a pauper he wears typical clothing for his status in this era: a tunic, long tight pantaloons to cover his legs, and lengthy, moss-stuffed poulaines ( leather shoes with long, flaccid tips ).

He works as a thief to support his mother and younger sister, who are also paupers. His father is either deceased or his whereabouts unknown ( he is unimportant and does not make an appearance in the story ). While waiting for employment, he waits in a favorite, unused alleyway.

One morning, while waiting for work, his back resting against the wall, he's approached by a lady in a black elegant dress, denoting privilege . . . her face hidden by a cowl . . . . .

I can smell an Assassins Creed ripoff...
Anyway, continue.

LOL. No. This is a unique story.
Juan_Pablo
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2/22/2014 12:16:59 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
a pri-o-ri

The woman in the black elegant dress approaches Emilio and tells him, "Hey kid: I hear you're pretty good." Emilio is baffled because he's never seen this woman before; he asks how she knows about his work. She tells him that she's heard stories from some of his secret employers in the city. She then conveys that she has a job for him this very same night (before midnight) and that she will reward him handsomely if he completes it. Hesitating at first, he agrees.

She informs him that a huge stockpile of treasure from the middle-east has been quietly transported to a certain warehouse in Florence and that she wants him to infiltrate and collect one object in particular, without getting caught. She describes the object: It's a black hexagonal box, six inches in length, width and height (an "inch" is the width of a man's thumb), and it's covered in a relief of winged-angels that appear to want to keep the box closed. She tells him that under no circumstances should he open the box. She also advises him that this warehouse will be well-guarded and that he "must not be caught"; however, he can take whatever else he can export out of the warehouse.

She and the payment she has for him will be waiting a safe distance at a location she has specified when he exits the warehouse. They cover other pertinent details and then she leaves . . . .
Juan_Pablo
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2/22/2014 12:18:32 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
Correction:

She and his payment will be waiting a safe distance at a location she has specified when he exits the warehouse. They cover other pertinent details and then she leaves . . . .
Juan_Pablo
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2/22/2014 2:09:16 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
a pri-o-ri

It's just before midnight. Emilio arrives at the warehouse and inconspicuously investigates its perimeter, pretending to be a passerby. After detecting weaknesses in the human security he fastens his trademark white party mask with the crooked nose onto his face, and makes his way through a broken block wall; inside the yard, he covertly searches for a way into the large building and discovers a small crawl space, covered in a metal lattice - but loose at one end.

He pushes on the lattice and makes his way inside. He follows the crawlspace and detects several tight openings to rooms inside the warehouse. Most of these narrow openings are covered in bars. Venturing further into the craw space, he comes across a barred opening to a room containing tables and stacks of treasure. He tightly squeezes through the bars and scurries underneath a table. A single oil lamp is burning in the room; he listens for voices and for movement to detect a human presence. He determines that no one is in the room and quickly searches for the hexagonal box. After a bit of searching, he discovers it on a table, lodged underneath a stack of treasure.

He removes some of the treasure but is unable to dislodge the box - so he pulls on it . . .

The remaining pile of treasure crashes to the floor, making a resonant clanging sound. The lid on the box is pushed open; inside Emilio finds a red jewel with some kind of strange engraving on it, consisting of an ankh or cross and other strange details.

He hears voices on the other side of a door in the room. In the excitement, Emilio takes the jewel, puts it in his mouth and swallows it! He then dashes in the direction away from the door and hides under a table, next to a pile of treasure resting on the ground . . .
Juan_Pablo
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2/22/2014 5:46:22 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
a pri-o-ri

Two adult men enter the room: one large, the other skinny. They shamble to the pile of treasure that fell on the floor, investigating. "Do you think it was rats?" asks the skinny one. The large one doesn't answer; he pokes around the room, looking under tables and around piles of stacked treasure. "Might be nothing," he exclaims.

Underneath a table, Emilio accidentally elbows a stack of gold and bronze goblets, causing them to fall over and clank on the ground. The two men bolt in his direction, finding him next to the leg of a table. "Well! It looks like we do have a rat!" bellows the large man. "A rat that likes to plunder other people's belongings!" The skinny man looks him up and down. "Yes. Clearly a bad little rat!"

The heavy man heaves Emilio up into the air by his tunic. "So. What should we do with this vermin?" The two men toy with Emilio for another minute. Then the conversation turns serious: "the Boss told us no one should know about the contents of this room," declares the skinny man. The heavy man looks at the skinny man with giant eyes.

All three of them exit the room and march to another room in warehouse, where Emilio is coiled in thick rope and fitted with heavy metal weights. The two men take Emilio outside the warehouse and throw him into a well full of water, where he sinks and drowns.

Blackness . . .

At night, in a misty tombstone-covered cemetery, a human hand emerges from damp, leafy soil . . . followed by an arm . . . then a naked body. The body stands upright, black dirt on its face. It is the body of a young male, approximately twelve.

Out in the distant, strange illumination can be seen, dotting the hillside. The blinking light of a radio tower can be discerned. Some of the lights even seem to be moving.

Emilio stands before the modern-day city of Florence, unable to comprehend what has just happened.
Juan_Pablo
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2/22/2014 5:57:26 PM
Posted: 2 years ago
a pri-o-ri is one of my more ambitious stories. Like my first story, it is heavily philosophical and it deals with a child from an ancient era trying to adjust to life in the modern age. There is also an extensive component of the supernatural in the story ( though I explain it rationally and how it works ).

The story involves a race of Angels ( called the "pre-terrestrials" ), an ancient extinct alien race, a decimated planet that use to harbor life ( called "Aurum" ), and a cabal of scientists who are attempting to change the very physical laws of the universe itself . . . but for what purpose?

Originally, A pri-o-ri was going to be a fan-fiction story about a journey embarked by Lara Croft, after her services are requested by an obscure cleric named Cardinal Molyneux . . . who in fact has an enormous agenda behind the mission. This, too, would have been a fantastic story!