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Can I expand my vocal range?

SegBeg
Posts: 8
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6/15/2016 4:14:55 PM
Posted: 5 months ago
I sing as you might have noticed. However, sometimes I feel like I'm not enough. I think I'm an alto so I tend to sing lower. I can't hit the high notes which I would really like to do as I have an aspiration to be a stage performer (like on the West End) and I notice a lot of the female actors sing rather high. I just cannot sing that high. I fell like altos are underappreciated in the music industry. I don't mind singing lower. I just want to be able to hit the higher notes as well as the lower notes in order to expand my vocal range. My family does not seem to be very supportive. Have you got any advice for me? Is it possible for me to be able to sing a bit higher in order to hit those high notes?
missmozart
Posts: 306
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6/16/2016 6:31:41 PM
Posted: 5 months ago
At 6/15/2016 4:14:55 PM, SegBeg wrote:
I sing as you might have noticed. However, sometimes I feel like I'm not enough. I think I'm an alto so I tend to sing lower. I can't hit the high notes which I would really like to do as I have an aspiration to be a stage performer (like on the West End) and I notice a lot of the female actors sing rather high. I just cannot sing that high. I fell like altos are underappreciated in the music industry. I don't mind singing lower. I just want to be able to hit the higher notes as well as the lower notes in order to expand my vocal range. My family does not seem to be very supportive. Have you got any advice for me? Is it possible for me to be able to sing a bit higher in order to hit those high notes?

First of all, I'm so glad that you have such a love for music!

From my reading of your profile, I presume that you're a decent singer already because of all your constant practising. Regarding how to sing high notes, I think it would be best to know your vocal range first. It's not enough just to guess "alto". If you have a piano or a keyboard at home, explore your limits:

(General rule:)
Alto= G (below middle C) to C (octave above middle C)
Mezzo soprano= A (below middle C) to E (10th above middle C)
Soprano= Middle C to G (12th above middle C)

Once you know where you're at, you can decide how much you want to expand your vocal range. The best way to do that is to practise plenty of scales (similar motion, arpeggios etc.) every day for a few weeks or months depending on your voice and focus on reaching higher notes. Try to train your voice in a more structured way and pay attention to improving your technique, tuning etc. Using an instrument such as a piano is very helpful if you haven't been doing that already. If you are thinking of singing professionally, I would recommend taking lessons from a good teacher so that you can learn all sorts of breathing techniques among others. Teaching someone to sing is like teaching someone to ride an invisible bike so you need personal guidance.

(Also, I really wouldn't say that alto singers are underappreciated, there are many amazing alto singers such as Adele.)

Your "family does not seem very supportive". That is usually the case when their children tell them that they want to become a "stage performer" in "West End". Ask them if you could take professional vocal training (if you really want this) and then after a while, just prove to your parents that you have the ability, diligence and determination to realise your ambition. If they see hope, they will definitely support you! If not, just remember that they want what's best for you in life.

Also, at the end of the day, music is not just about "singing the high notes", there are many other aspects to it, like musicianship. Some songs make you say "wow" even if they don't have a lot of "high impressive notes".

Good luck :), all the best for your future!
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SegBeg
Posts: 8
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6/17/2016 4:48:07 PM
Posted: 5 months ago
At 6/16/2016 6:31:41 PM, missmozart wrote:
At 6/15/2016 4:14:55 PM, SegBeg wrote:
I sing as you might have noticed. However, sometimes I feel like I'm not enough. I think I'm an alto so I tend to sing lower. I can't hit the high notes which I would really like to do as I have an aspiration to be a stage performer (like on the West End) and I notice a lot of the female actors sing rather high. I just cannot sing that high. I fell like altos are underappreciated in the music industry. I don't mind singing lower. I just want to be able to hit the higher notes as well as the lower notes in order to expand my vocal range. My family does not seem to be very supportive. Have you got any advice for me? Is it possible for me to be able to sing a bit higher in order to hit those high notes?


First of all, I'm so glad that you have such a love for music!

From my reading of your profile, I presume that you're a decent singer already because of all your constant practising. Regarding how to sing high notes, I think it would be best to know your vocal range first. It's not enough just to guess "alto". If you have a piano or a keyboard at home, explore your limits:

(General rule:)
Alto= G (below middle C) to C (octave above middle C)
Mezzo soprano= A (below middle C) to E (10th above middle C)
Soprano= Middle C to G (12th above middle C)

Once you know where you're at, you can decide how much you want to expand your vocal range. The best way to do that is to practise plenty of scales (similar motion, arpeggios etc.) every day for a few weeks or months depending on your voice and focus on reaching higher notes. Try to train your voice in a more structured way and pay attention to improving your technique, tuning etc. Using an instrument such as a piano is very helpful if you haven't been doing that already. If you are thinking of singing professionally, I would recommend taking lessons from a good teacher so that you can learn all sorts of breathing techniques among others. Teaching someone to sing is like teaching someone to ride an invisible bike so you need personal guidance.

(Also, I really wouldn't say that alto singers are underappreciated, there are many amazing alto singers such as Adele.)

Your "family does not seem very supportive". That is usually the case when their children tell them that they want to become a "stage performer" in "West End". Ask them if you could take professional vocal training (if you really want this) and then after a while, just prove to your parents that you have the ability, diligence and determination to realise your ambition. If they see hope, they will definitely support you! If not, just remember that they want what's best for you in life.

Also, at the end of the day, music is not just about "singing the high notes", there are many other aspects to it, like musicianship. Some songs make you say "wow" even if they don't have a lot of "high impressive notes".

Good luck :), all the best for your future!

Thanks for the support! I like to sing On My Own from Les Miserables. If you know it, the part where my voice cannot take it is about the bit where it goes "that I'm talking to myself" So like I want to be able to go as high as that song goes. About the professional vocal training though, it sounds like a good idea and I would love it but I don't think my parents would want to pay so much money. I have been looking at videos online. Is that enough?

I know that singing is not all about hitting all the higher notes. I like my lower range but... well you know what? I'm pretty sure there are a lot of female pop singers who altos like Adele but even with Adele, she can sing very high and low so she had a wide range. But with stage singers though- female stage singers, they always sing so high or have a mixed vocal range like Lea Salonga or Idina Menzel so they can sing very low but at the same time very high. I just feel it's incredible. I sort of have a little dream to be in Les Miserables and play either Eponine or Cosette but they both sing rather high so if I ever want to play them, I will have to expand my vocal range. I can't sing falsetto all the time. I had to do that for big portions of the song in my singing exam which I disliked as I would have been able to sing the song so much better if only I could have hit those high notes along with the low notes.

But nevertheless, I'll take on yor advice and get cracking on those scales. Thanks!!