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Best poem/song in your language

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8/31/2016 9:21:00 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
Post your favourite song/poem in your language.

Salve o popolo d'eroi
Salve o patria immortale
Son rinati i figli tuoi
Con la fede e l'ideale
Il valor dei tuoi guerrieri,
La virt" dei tuoi pionieri
La vision dell'Alighieri
Oggi brilla in tutti i cuor
Giovinezza, giovinezza,
Primavera di bellezza
Per la vita, nell'asprezza
Il tuo canto squilla e va!
E per Benito Mussolini,
Eja eja alala
E per la nostra Patria bella,
Eja eja alala
Dell'Italia nei confini
Son rifatti gli italiani;
Li ha rifatti Mussolini
Per la guerra di domani
Per la gloria del lavoro
Per la pace e per l'alloro,
Per la gogna di coloro
Che la patria rinnegar.
I poeti e gli artigiani
I signori e i contadini
Con orgoglio d'italiani
Giuran fede a Mussolini.
Non v'" povero quartiere
Che non mandi le sue schiere
Che non spieghi le bandiere
Del fascismo redentor.
Mark 10:44-45 "44 and whoever wants to be first must be slave of all. 45 For even the Son of Man did not come to be served, but to serve, and to give his life as a ransom for many."
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9/3/2016 10:01:13 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
I couldn't find a good song sung in the actual Irish language on YT but here's one in English entitled the 'Foggy Dew'. It's performed by the Chieftans and Sinead O'Connor and depicts the 1916 Rising where the Irish fought for independence from the British. The scenes in the video are from the movie 'The Wind that Shakes the Barley' and I would really recommend watching it :)
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9/4/2016 6:57:19 AM
Posted: 1 month ago
You always can publish something absorbing that does not waste minutes of your life like what you see on countless other sites. This is very interesting and I will be back for more. Thanks for sharing
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9/7/2016 4:11:09 AM
Posted: 1 month ago

Easily one of my favorite songs. I performed this song for an oral interpretation class on suicide. I picked this because it's not just English, but AAVE. It taps into a dark, personal, very human part of life without "literary" language. Very upfront and unforgiving.
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9/7/2016 5:04:32 AM
Posted: 1 month ago
I love these poems:

"Thunder blossoms gorgeously above our heads,
Great, hollow, bell-like flowers,
Rumbling in the wind,
Stretching clappers to strike our ears . . .
Full-lipped flowers
Bitten by the sun
Bleeding rain
Dripping rain like golden honey --
And the sweet earth flying from the thunder."
- Jean Toomer -

Too long to post, but I love anything by Eliot, especially this:

And this:

"And a woman spoke, saying, 'Tell us of Pain.'

And he said:

Your pain is the breaking of the shell that encloses your understanding.

Even as the stone of the fruit must break, that its heart may stand in the sun, so must you know pain.

And could you keep your heart in wonder at the daily miracles of your life, your pain would not seem less wondrous than your joy;

And you would accept the seasons of your heart, even as you have always accepted the seasons that pass over your fields.

And you would watch with serenity through the winters of your grief.

Much of your pain is self-chosen.

It is the bitter potion by which the physician within you heals your sick self.

Therefore trust the physician, and drink his remedy in silence and tranquillity:

For his hand, though heavy and hard, is guided by the tender hand of the Unseen,

And the cup he brings, though it burn your lips, has been fashioned of the clay which the Potter has moistened with His own sacred tears."
- Khalil Gibran -

"Night, sable goddess! from her ebon throne,
In rayless majesty, now stretches forth
Her leaden sceptre o'er a slumbering world.
Silence, how dead! and darkness, how profound!
Nor eye, nor listening ear, an object finds;
Creation sleeps. 'Tis as the general pulse
Of life stood still, and Nature made a pause."
- Edward Young -

"It is something to have wept as we have wept,
It is something to have done as we have done,
It is something to have watched when all men slept,
And seen the stars which never see the sun.

It is something to have smelt the mystic rose,
Although it break and leave the thorny rods,
It is something to have hungered once as those
Must hunger who have ate the bread of gods.

To have seen you and your unforgotten face,
Brave as a blast of trumpets for the fray,
Pure as white lilies in a watery space,
It were something, though you went from me today.

To have known the things that from the weak are furled,
Perilous ancient passions, strange and high;
It is something to be wiser than the world,
It is something to be older than the sky.

In a time of sceptic moths and cynic rusts,
And fattened lives that of their sweetness tire
In a world of flying loves and fading lusts,
It is something to be sure of a desire.

Lo, blessed are our ears for they have heard;
Yea, blessed are our eyes for they have seen:
Let the thunder break on man and beast and bird
And the lightning. It is something to have been."
- G. K. Chesterton -

And of course Paradise Lost, by Milton. Two of my favorite excerpts:

"Abashed the Devil stood,
And felt how awful goodness is, and saw
Virtue in her shape how lovely.
-- saw, and pined his loss."

"And that must end us; that must be our cure--
To be no more. Sad cure! for who would lose,
Though full of pain, this intellectual being,
Those thoughts that wander through eternity,
To perish rather, swallowed up and lost
In the wide womb of uncreated Night,
Devoid of sense and motion?"
"For a society in which the determinant mass of families were owners of capital and of land; for one in which production was regulated by self-governing corporations of small owners; and for one in which the misery and insecurity of a proletariat was unknown, there came to be substituted the dreadful moral anarchy against which all moral effort is now turned, and which goes by the name of Capitalism."
- Hilaire Belloc -
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9/10/2016 12:01:16 AM
Posted: 1 month ago
"It's interesting to observe that almost all truly worthy men have simple manners, and that simple manners are almost always taken as a sign of little worth" - Giacomo Leopardi

"It is more honorable to be raised to a throne than to be born to one. Fortune bestows the one, merit obtains the other." - Francesco Petrarca

"You too must not count too much on your reality as you feel it today, since like yesterday, it may prove an illusion for you tomorrow." - Luigi Pirandello
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9/10/2016 10:08:31 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
The Guy in the Glass

by Dale Wimbrow, (c) 1934

When you get what you want in your struggle for pelf,
And the world makes you King for a day,
Then go to the mirror and look at yourself,
And see what that guy has to say.

For it isn't your Father, or Mother, or Wife,
Who judgement upon you must pass.
The feller whose verdict counts most in your life
Is the guy staring back from the glass.

He's the feller to please, never mind all the rest,
For he's with you clear up to the end,
And you've passed your most dangerous, difficult test
If the guy in the glass is your friend.

You may be like Jack Horner and "chisel" a plum,
And think you're a wonderful guy,
But the man in the glass says you're only a bum
If you can't look him straight in the eye.

You can fool the whole world down the pathway of years,
And get pats on the back as you pass,
But your final reward will be heartaches and tears
If you've cheated the guy in the glass.

***This poem may not be the most aesthetic or refined in the English language, but I can guarantee that it has helped far more people get through hardships in their lives than most other poems may lay claim to.

It has helped prisoners, recovering alcoholics, and many others seeking redemption and self-worth. It has aided politicians, businessmen, and many others in positions of power maintain their integrity.

And, most importantly in my own life, it hangs on my bedroom in a portrait - created by my grandparents to help my father through his troubles - to help me try to make the right decisions and remind me of where I came from.