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View on subject matter of rap music?

1harderthanyouthink
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9/19/2016 1:22:30 AM
Posted: 2 months ago
I want to pose these questions on DDO, to see what answers I get. Not many people I know of here listen to much rap music, so I think the answers I get here could be an interesting point for discussion regardless of who it comes from.

I want anyone who comes across this thread to answer the questions, whether or not they are a common listener of rap music.

Do you think rap music's subject matter is violent? Why do you think that?

If you answered yes to the above, do you think that is inherent?

If you answered no to the above, why do you think people believe that?

---

Do you think rappers are generally misogynists, or want to strengthen women in society?

If you answered yes to the above, how many rappers are you basing that answer off of? Are they popular, or lesser known?

---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact in music? Why?

Do you believe rap is music?

Do you believe rap music ought to be considered art?

---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on black American culture? Why?

---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on overall American culture? Why?

---

Why do you think rap has declined in concentration of political content since the 1990s? Did you know prior to right now that this decline has happened?

---

I look forward to any answers.
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Vaarka
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9/19/2016 2:02:27 AM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 9/19/2016 1:22:30 AM, 1harderthanyouthink wrote:
I want to pose these questions on DDO, to see what answers I get. Not many people I know of here listen to much rap music, so I think the answers I get here could be an interesting point for discussion regardless of who it comes from.

I want anyone who comes across this thread to answer the questions, whether or not they are a common listener of rap music.

Do you think rap music's subject matter is violent? Why do you think that?
No, at least not from the rap I've heard.

If you answered yes to the above, do you think that is inherent?

If you answered no to the above, why do you think people believe that?
It's more of just my own thoughts. Idk why anyone else would specifically believe that

---

Do you think rappers are generally misogynists, or want to strengthen women in society?
uh...idk?

If you answered yes to the above, how many rappers are you basing that answer off of? Are they popular, or lesser known?
Yes to which one?

---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact in music? Why?
I think some does. From what I've heard, rap ranges, but it usually tells some kind of story, or relates in some way.

Do you believe rap is music?
Yeah

Do you believe rap music ought to be considered art?
Music is art, so sure

---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on black American culture? Why?
Undecided

---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on overall American culture? Why?
I think it's given some people chances that they otherwise wouldn't have, plus a fun pass time between friends.

---

Why do you think rap has declined in concentration of political content since the 1990s? Did you know prior to right now that this decline has happened?
No idea

---

I look forward to any answers.

np :3
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Emmarie
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9/19/2016 2:12:46 AM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 9/19/2016 1:22:30 AM, 1harderthanyouthink wrote:
I want to pose these questions on DDO, to see what answers I get. Not many people I know of here listen to much rap music, so I think the answers I get here could be an interesting point for discussion regardless of who it comes from.

I want anyone who comes across this thread to answer the questions, whether or not they are a common listener of rap music.

Do you think rap music's subject matter is violent? Why do you think that?
No, HipHop music has lyrics about a broad spectrum of subjects. Most Rappers compose lyrics from a first person perspective, and if they have been exposed to violence in their lives, the lyrics reflect this influence. Most rappers don't condone violence.

If you answered yes to the above, do you think that is inherent?

If you answered no to the above, why do you think people believe that?
There's nothing to "believe." I know from listening to it.

---

Do you think rappers are generally misogynists, or want to strengthen women in society?
The booty theme in many rap lyrics is an appreciation for the female body. There are many rappers who have deep respect for women.

If you answered yes to the above, how many rappers are you basing that answer off of? Are they popular, or lesser known?

---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact in music? Why?
I think it has had a neutral effect on music in general, but the culture of HipHop has had a positive impact on society as a whole.

Do you believe rap is music?
Yes

Do you believe rap music ought to be considered art?
Most definitely, but not all HipHop is art. Freestyle (off the dome) is the most creative thing I have ever experienced listening to or taking part in.

---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on black American culture? Why?
Black Americans are a diverse group of people who do not all listen to hip hop music or rap. Economic conditions have had the most impact on black americans.

---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on overall American culture? Why?
Most groups that the mainstream likes perpetuates stereotypes that make them believe that the culture is different than it really is.

---

Why do you think rap has declined in concentration of political content since the 1990s? Did you know prior to right now that this decline has happened?
Of course I knew it has declined, and it is because the music marketeers have chosen to promote groups who perpetuate negative stereotypes about the larger cutlture it wants it to misrepresent.

---

I look forward to any answers.
bsh1
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9/19/2016 3:45:58 AM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 9/19/2016 1:22:30 AM, 1harderthanyouthink wrote:
Do you think rap music's subject matter is violent? Why do you think that?

Yes.

If you answered yes to the above, do you think that is inherent?

No, but it is common.

Do you think rappers are generally misogynists, or want to strengthen women in society?

Misogynists..

If you answered yes to the above, how many rappers are you basing that answer off of? Are they popular, or lesser known?

Generic impression of a person who rarely listens to rap.

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact in music? Why?

Negative. Promoted violent sexualization of women.

Do you believe rap is music?

No.

Do you believe rap music ought to be considered art?

Yes.

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on black American culture? Why?

Negative. Same reasons as above. Glorifies violence.
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PetersSmith
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9/19/2016 3:53:52 AM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 9/19/2016 1:22:30 AM, 1harderthanyouthink wrote:
I want to pose these questions on DDO, to see what answers I get. Not many people I know of here listen to much rap music, so I think the answers I get here could be an interesting point for discussion regardless of who it comes from.

I want anyone who comes across this thread to answer the questions, whether or not they are a common listener of rap music.

Do you think rap music's subject matter is violent? Why do you think that?

Rap has a tendency to be about violence, is sexist, and about drugs and alcohol. I "think" this because it's in the lyrics themselves.

If you answered yes to the above, do you think that is inherent?

I think that "rap" could be about anything, but most "rappers" have a tendency to lean towards those topics because they're ghetto trash.

If you answered no to the above, why do you think people believe that?

---

Do you think rappers are generally misogynists, or want to strengthen women in society?

Misogynists. I haven't heard one rap song trying to empower women.

If you answered yes to the above, how many rappers are you basing that answer off of? Are they popular, or lesser known?

Every popular one pretty much except for maybe Eminem.

---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact in music? Why?

Negative. It's not melodic, it has no tune or beat, is normally full of disgusting language and vulgarity, and it promotes negative stereotypes.

Do you believe rap is music?

Nope.

Do you believe rap music ought to be considered art?

No.
---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on black American culture? Why?

Negative. It glorifies the stereotypes that whites see in them (the trashy, ghetto type that we perceive as dangerous).

---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on overall American culture? Why?

Negative. As stated before, it glorifies the negatives in blacks and removes the rhythm and harmony of music.

---

Why do you think rap has declined in concentration of political content since the 1990s? Did you know prior to right now that this decline has happened?

Probably because the Civil Rights issue has been solved and blacks have taken more to activism. And, generally, rap today seem to be the rappers bathing in their own negative stereotypes. Id din't even know there were "raps" about politics except for Epic Rap Battles of History, which I don't consider rap.

---

I look forward to any answers.
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tejretics
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9/19/2016 11:44:10 AM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 9/19/2016 1:22:30 AM, 1harderthanyouthink wrote:
Do you think rap music's subject matter is violent? Why do you think that?

Depends on the specific song in question. The genre isn't violent.

Do you think rappers are generally misogynists, or want to strengthen women in society?

The average rapper isn't misogynist.

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact in music? Why?

Neutral. I don't personally find anything special about it. I dislike it, generally, but I dislike a lot of genres.

Do you believe rap is music?

Yes.

Do you believe rap music ought to be considered art?

Yes.

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on black American culture? Why?

Not a fan of race-based culture in general - no comment.

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on overall American culture? Why?

Neutral. It isn't significant enough.

Why do you think rap has declined in concentration of political content since the 1990s? Did you know prior to right now that this decline has happened?

I didn't know.
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9/19/2016 6:36:16 PM
Posted: 2 months ago
Regardless of your feelings on rap, denying that rap is music is to disregard every definition of music. Rap has lyrics, tonal melodies, and strong rhythms, among other characteristic musical themes, so there's no way rap couldn't be classified as music.
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Quadrunner
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9/19/2016 11:54:08 PM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 9/19/2016 1:22:30 AM, 1harderthanyouthink wrote:
I want to pose these questions on DDO, to see what answers I get. Not many people I know of here listen to much rap music, so I think the answers I get here could be an interesting point for discussion regardless of who it comes from.

I want anyone who comes across this thread to answer the questions, whether or not they are a common listener of rap music.

Do you think rap music's subject matter is violent? Why do you think that?

It used to be, but seems to be less so now. Its more about sex these days.

If you answered yes to the above, do you think that is inherent?

If you answered no to the above, why do you think people believe that?

Rap sympathizes with inner city problems. Many rappers took it a little far and romanticized the gangster lifestyle in the 1990's-2000's. Personally that image is still what I think of when I think of typical rap, and then I have 2 other categories, being the original stuff which I love, and sissy rap which I'm not to big on.

---

Do you think rappers are generally misogynists, or want to strengthen women in society?

Neither. I think they like their B!tches. That is all.

If you answered yes to the above, how many rappers are you basing that answer off of? Are they popular, or lesser known?

---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact in music? Why?

I'd say negative, and not because I don't like rap but because I have this love/hate relationship with it. I love some of the better rap songs, but a generic rap song sounds AWFUL, and an "eh" effort just isn't enough. Now that its influence is spreading to other genre's I am seeing negative applications throughout the industry as a whole. Have you heard one of those country rap songs?

Do you believe rap is music?

I can understand why people call it noise, but personally I believe its music unless you are treating it like noise.

Do you believe rap music ought to be considered art?

YES

---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on black American culture? Why?

Honestly I have no idea, but I'm sure it wasn't positive in recent times simply because of the subject content.

---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on overall American culture? Why?

Neutral. It just is what it is.

---

Why do you think rap has declined in concentration of political content since the 1990s? Did you know prior to right now that this decline has happened?

I think that its become more of a machine, similar to the pop industry. In general, I see less originality, less uniqueness now, and though I'm not the big enough fan to know if that's how it actually is, I would normally attribute that to overly strong producers that are weakening artists in order to dip into generic money makers that "everyone can relate to".

---

I look forward to any answers.
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R0b1Billion
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9/24/2016 4:37:28 PM
Posted: 2 months ago
At 9/19/2016 1:22:30 AM, 1harderthanyouthink wrote:

Do you think rap music's subject matter is violent? Why do you think that?

No. I have seen Christian raps about God before. They were horrid, but they do exist as as extreme outlier. The question you mean to ask is "is hip hop's subject matter violent?" The answer to that question is that hip hop is aggressive.

If you answered yes to the above, do you think that is inherent?

Certainly. Non-agressive rap would be difficult to classify as hip hop. Hip hop is about youth and vigor, being raised in the ghetto and fighting back to survive. Even a rather timid song, like 93 till infinity by souls of mischief, has obvious aggressive passages.

Do you think rappers are generally misogynists, or want to strengthen women in society?

Being able to control women is an important aspect of the vitality of a young man in the ghetto. In the hip hop culture, women seek strength. It is rather carnal, but this phenomenon is certainly not limited to the hip hop culture, it exists ubiquitously throughout most cultures. Many women actually prefer to be dominated, I'm not saying it is healthy or natural, but girls, particularly ones who lack a strong, healthy father figure, seek out men who project strength. Hip hoppers may not be inherently misogynistic, but they understand that to get what they want out of women they must dominate them.

If you answered yes to the above, how many rappers are you basing that answer off of? Are they popular, or lesser known?

I would be very surprised for you to supply me an example of a rapper who doesn't display a distinct dominance over women.

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact in music? Why?

Well it has branched out into rock a bit, so I guess that is positive. It introduces a new style for people to use to express themselves.

Do you believe rap is music?

That is not up for debate.

Do you believe rap music ought to be considered art?

That is not up for debate. I wouldn't waste my time arguing with somebody who denied these any longer than I would entertain flat-earth discussions.

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on black American culture? Why?

At first glance it is negative but one has to realize that the cart and the horse are flipped here. Hip hop is a response to negative circumstances, not a cause. If your good suburban teenager listens to it and is tainted by the message, I would argue that child was already tainted to begin with.

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on overall American culture? Why?

Again hip hop is an expression of culture, it is culture itself manifesting into a message. It is circular to say that culture damages culture.

Why do you think rap has declined in concentration of political content since the 1990s? Did you know prior to right now that this decline has happened?

Popular music follows the dollar. More dollars are spent on more trivial subject matter.
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Dujec
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10/16/2016 8:37:10 AM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 9/19/2016 1:22:30 AM, 1harderthanyouthink wrote:
I want to pose these questions on DDO, to see what answers I get. Not many people I know of here listen to much rap music, so I think the answers I get here could be an interesting point for discussion regardless of who it comes from.


I hated rap for a long mainly because of the materialism = happiness theme and inflated egos. I've been listening for a few years and I really enjoy it now.

I want anyone who comes across this thread to answer the questions, whether or not they are a common listener of rap music.

Do you think rap music's subject matter is violent? Why do you think that?


Yes, I think it's ingrained as part of the ego complex. There are lot of violent references that are just for posturing imo.

If you answered yes to the above, do you think that is inherent?


No, and I think a lot of artists are changing and even shaming that outdated meme.

If you answered no to the above, why do you think people believe that?

---

Because it is so common in the past and change has been slow to change.


Do you think rappers are generally misogynists, or want to strengthen women in society?


I think it's still very common but the new generation is calling out the douche rappers that still act like this.

If you answered yes to the above, how many rappers are you basing that answer off of? Are they popular, or lesser known?

---

Several that are popular and it's still the norm among old school but the tipping point is coming and there are more and more women popular rappers (Santigold, Angel Haze etc) out there that are killing it.


Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact in music? Why?


It's kind of like twitter. If you can ignore the majority of hater trolls there are lot of fun positive people out there.

Do you believe rap is music?


Yes, definitely.

Do you believe rap music ought to be considered art?

---

Yes, like any other style of music.


Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on black American culture? Why?

---

I don't think I can speak to that but I'd refer to my comment about it's impact on music.


Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on overall American culture? Why?

---

"

Why do you think rap has declined in concentration of political content since the 1990s? Did you know prior to right now that this decline has happened?

---

If I had to guess it's due to general disinterest in a corrupt, changeless system, especially from millennials.


I look forward to any answers.
Blade-of-Truth
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10/26/2016 6:16:18 AM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 9/19/2016 1:22:30 AM, 1harderthanyouthink wrote:
I want to pose these questions on DDO, to see what answers I get. Not many people I know of here listen to much rap music, so I think the answers I get here could be an interesting point for discussion regardless of who it comes from.

I want anyone who comes across this thread to answer the questions, whether or not they are a common listener of rap music.

Do you think rap music's subject matter is violent? Why do you think that?

This is a complicated question. I think "mainstream" rap primarily consists of violent subject matter. Just look at the current chicago bang or trap music trend. With that said, there is certainly great underground rap that consists mostly of intelligent or politically fueled lyrics.

As to why current mainstream rap has a love affair with violent subject matter, I think we need to look back to the 90's when gangster rap first took off. All of today's rappers grew up on that music. You'll hear these new guys saying how Tupac, Snoop, Biggie, and others were inspiring for them - but those guys are all the godfathers of gangster rap, and the violence fueled lyrics of that age is carried through into the next generation due to them serving as their inspiration while growing up.

Furthermore, and importantly, not all mainstream rap is violent. Kendrick Lamar, J. Cole, and even Drake all put out decent "rap" that isn't necessarily ridden with violent subject matter. I think, at the end of the day, the main demographic of consumers for this music live and experience rougher environments and situations, thus they can connect easier to the violence captured in the subject matter of mainstream rap. This is a truth with all music though - country artists sing about situations that occur mainly in rural environments, etc., so it logically follows that mainstream rap taps into that violent subject matter to better connect with an audience that experiences those things in their lived environments.

If you answered yes to the above, do you think that is inherent?

If I take inherent to mean something that is a characteristic attribute then yes and no. Rap fans vary greatly from true hip-hop heads who listen to underground stuff only, fans of battle rap who listen mainly to battle rappers, chicago bang fans who listen only to that new mumble rap, or southern rap fans who enjoy slower beats or smoother flows.

So, I think, depending on the demographic they are trying to appeal to, yes it's inherent, since that's what connects most to the consumer they are wanting to attract. But, it's not inherent in the forms of rap that appeal to fans who aren't necessarily attracted to violent subject matter.

Do you think rappers are generally misogynists, or want to strengthen women in society?

Ahh man, that's tough to answer. Alot of mainstream rappers generally come off as misogynists. Be it because they still heavily rely on "video girls" in their music videos - completely objectifying them - or because they're always rapping about getting bitches or women being submissive or in submissive roles.

However, there are also alot of underground and older rappers who support equality. Immortal Technique is one that immediately comes to mind. I do think though, ultimately, that rappers as a whole tend to lean more to the misogynist side.

If you answered yes to the above, how many rappers are you basing that answer off of? Are they popular, or lesser known?

Mostly the popular rappers these days. Some also give off mixed signals, such as Drake. In his R&B songs he clearly plays up women because that's who he's trying to sell those specific records to, but then he has some rap songs in which he refers to women as bitches and has them jumping around him in his videos while in skimpy outfits - basically objectifying them.

I think the lesser known artists don't do it as much, mostly because they haven't broken out yet into the mainstream and don't have to align their own messages with the ones that tend to sell well in the mainstream scene such as rapping about "bitches" or having music videos of them raining money on strippers and stuff.

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact in music? Why?

Depends what type of rap, seriously. Mainstream rap is mostly garbage that fails to really advance or contribute to the rap game as a whole. So in that sense I'd say its had a negative impact. Underground rap is still alive and well though, and certainly positive for the most part.

Do you believe rap is music?

Depends on the type of rap, lol. But honestly, what we define as music can range so much from person to person. I personally believe that most rap is music, but some of this new mumble rap is straight garbage.

Do you believe rap music ought to be considered art?

Some forms of rap, yes. I think battle rap is an art-form, as is certain underground rap. Beautiful beats could be considered an art form as well. Kanye, love him or hate him, was the last real pioneer in the rap producing scene, really capitalizing on using the human voice as instruments in his beats and I firmly believe that such creativity is an act of art. He truly furthered "music theory" in regard to the rap beat making scene.

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on black American culture? Why?

I think mainstream rap has had a negative impact. These kids grow up on these music videos that objectify women and treat them like garbage. So then these kids try to emulate what they see because it's all they know and the cycle of abuse just continues onwards.

It's so funny how some of these artists are such hypocrites as well. I saw a Snoop Dogg video that featured girls topless getting money dropped on them or walking around on all fours like a dog with a collar and leash.... just awful stuff. But in reality Snoop hasn't ever cheated on his wife and is incredibly loyal as a family man, even being quoted one time saying his wife is the master of the house. So they aren't even being real... they're acting like these dominating men when in reality they are good to their women behind the scenes. This, to me, is the most troubling aspect of it all, and speaks volumes about how these guys are giving up their power to positively influence their fans for the sake of sales.

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on overall American culture? Why?

I think this would be neutral only because rap isn't "too" influential in the grand scheme of things. After the assassinations of Tupac and Biggie, the rap game sort of quieted down. There's still rap events or happenings that make the national news circuits, but rarely.

Why do you think rap has declined in concentration of political content since the 1990s? Did you know prior to right now that this decline has happened?

Underground rap hasn't in the slightest. Mainstream rap? Probably because of the deaths of Tupac and Biggie. Things really changed when that happened, and from then on so did the lyrical content. They created a gangster rap scene and left a huge vacuum that was quickly filled with all sorts of content-copycats. Unfortunately, those copy cats failed to include political messages and the next generation of "all-gangster, no truth" was born. The intelligent rappers were pushed underground.

I also think the collaboration between record execs and the private prison industry that started in the early 90's played a major role - but that's a story for another day. It's just odd that several major record labels own stock in these prisons. Selling violent music creates more convicts, so it's a win win.
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Dujec
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10/26/2016 11:59:50 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/26/2016 6:16:18 AM, Blade-of-Truth wrote:

This is a complicated question. I think "mainstream" rap primarily consists of violent subject matter. Just look at the current chicago bang or trap music trend. With that said, there is certainly great underground rap that consists mostly of intelligent or politically fueled lyrics.

As to why current mainstream rap has a love affair with violent subject matter, I think we need to look back to the 90's when gangster rap first took off. All of today's rappers grew up on that music. You'll hear these new guys saying how Tupac, Snoop, Biggie, and others were inspiring for them - but those guys are all the godfathers of gangster rap, and the violence fueled lyrics of that age is carried through into the next generation due to them serving as their inspiration while growing up.

Furthermore, and importantly, not all mainstream rap is violent. Kendrick Lamar, J. Cole, and even Drake all put out decent "rap" that isn't necessarily ridden with violent subject matter. I think, at the end of the day, the main demographic of consumers for this music live and experience rougher environments and situations, thus they can connect easier to the violence captured in the subject matter of mainstream rap. This is a truth with all music though - country artists sing about situations that occur mainly in rural environments, etc., so it logically follows that mainstream rap taps into that violent subject matter to better connect with an audience that experiences those things in their lived environments.

If you answered yes to the above, do you think that is inherent?

If I take inherent to mean something that is a characteristic attribute then yes and no. Rap fans vary greatly from true hip-hop heads who listen to underground stuff only, fans of battle rap who listen mainly to battle rappers, chicago bang fans who listen only to that new mumble rap, or southern rap fans who enjoy slower beats or smoother flows.

So, I think, depending on the demographic they are trying to appeal to, yes it's inherent, since that's what connects most to the consumer they are wanting to attract. But, it's not inherent in the forms of rap that appeal to fans who aren't necessarily attracted to violent subject matter.

Do you think rappers are generally misogynists, or want to strengthen women in society?

Ahh man, that's tough to answer. Alot of mainstream rappers generally come off as misogynists. Be it because they still heavily rely on "video girls" in their music videos - completely objectifying them - or because they're always rapping about getting bitches or women being submissive or in submissive roles.

However, there are also alot of underground and older rappers who support equality. Immortal Technique is one that immediately comes to mind. I do think though, ultimately, that rappers as a whole tend to lean more to the misogynist side.

If you answered yes to the above, how many rappers are you basing that answer off of? Are they popular, or lesser known?

Mostly the popular rappers these days. Some also give off mixed signals, such as Drake. In his R&B songs he clearly plays up women because that's who he's trying to sell those specific records to, but then he has some rap songs in which he refers to women as bitches and has them jumping around him in his videos while in skimpy outfits - basically objectifying them.

I think the lesser known artists don't do it as much, mostly because they haven't broken out yet into the mainstream and don't have to align their own messages with the ones that tend to sell well in the mainstream scene such as rapping about "bitches" or having music videos of them raining money on strippers and stuff.

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact in music? Why?

Depends what type of rap, seriously. Mainstream rap is mostly garbage that fails to really advance or contribute to the rap game as a whole. So in that sense I'd say its had a negative impact. Underground rap is still alive and well though, and certainly positive for the most part.

Do you believe rap is music?

Depends on the type of rap, lol. But honestly, what we define as music can range so much from person to person. I personally believe that most rap is music, but some of this new mumble rap is straight garbage.

Do you believe rap music ought to be considered art?

Some forms of rap, yes. I think battle rap is an art-form, as is certain underground rap. Beautiful beats could be considered an art form as well. Kanye, love him or hate him, was the last real pioneer in the rap producing scene, really capitalizing on using the human voice as instruments in his beats and I firmly believe that such creativity is an act of art. He truly furthered "music theory" in regard to the rap beat making scene.

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on black American culture? Why?

I think mainstream rap has had a negative impact. These kids grow up on these music videos that objectify women and treat them like garbage. So then these kids try to emulate what they see because it's all they know and the cycle of abuse just continues onwards.

It's so funny how some of these artists are such hypocrites as well. I saw a Snoop Dogg video that featured girls topless getting money dropped on them or walking around on all fours like a dog with a collar and leash.... just awful stuff. But in reality Snoop hasn't ever cheated on his wife and is incredibly loyal as a family man, even being quoted one time saying his wife is the master of the house. So they aren't even being real... they're acting like these dominating men when in reality they are good to their women behind the scenes. This, to me, is the most troubling aspect of it all, and speaks volumes about how these guys are giving up their power to positively influence their fans for the sake of sales.

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on overall American culture? Why?

I think this would be neutral only because rap isn't "too" influential in the grand scheme of things. After the assassinations of Tupac and Biggie, the rap game sort of quieted down. There's still rap events or happenings that make the national news circuits, but rarely.

Why do you think rap has declined in concentration of political content since the 1990s? Did you know prior to right now that this decline has happened?

Underground rap hasn't in the slightest. Mainstream rap? Probably because of the deaths of Tupac and Biggie. Things really changed when that happened, and from then on so did the lyrical content. They created a gangster rap scene and left a huge vacuum that was quickly filled with all sorts of content-copycats. Unfortunately, those copy cats failed to include political messages and the next generation of "all-gangster, no truth" was born. The intelligent rappers were pushed underground.

I also think the collaboration between record execs and the private prison industry that started in the early 90's played a major role - but that's a story for another day. It's just odd that several major record labels own stock in these prisons. Selling violent music creates more convicts, so it's a win win.

^ I'd like to change my answers.

Rappers are some of the most amazing lyricists out there; the rhyme schemes and word play can be outright astounding and qualify the genre as art imo. Not being a musician, these are often the main draw for me.

I agree you find the most substantial social/political or thoughtful lyrics with underground artists. I think this is true of any genre though. Signed rappers are also pressured to keep the old tropes going.
Blade-of-Truth
Posts: 5,036
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10/27/2016 7:16:59 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/26/2016 11:59:50 PM, Dujec wrote:
^ I'd like to change my answers.

Rappers are some of the most amazing lyricists out there; the rhyme schemes and word play can be outright astounding and qualify the genre as art imo. Not being a musician, these are often the main draw for me.

I absolutely agree. I often find that most good lyricists in the rap game would also make equally good poets, and some often do participate in spoken-word or poetry slam competitions. I personally enjoy multi-syllabic rappers. Check out the video I've included, all of these guys are extremely talented in my opinion:

I agree you find the most substantial social/political or thoughtful lyrics with underground artists. I think this is true of any genre though. Signed rappers are also pressured to keep the old tropes going.

Yup, I agree!
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Dujec
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10/28/2016 9:23:13 PM
Posted: 1 month ago
At 10/27/2016 7:16:59 PM, Blade-of-Truth wrote:
At 10/26/2016 11:59:50 PM, Dujec wrote:
^ I'd like to change my answers.

Rappers are some of the most amazing lyricists out there; the rhyme schemes and word play can be outright astounding and qualify the genre as art imo. Not being a musician, these are often the main draw for me.

I absolutely agree. I often find that most good lyricists in the rap game would also make equally good poets, and some often do participate in spoken-word or poetry slam competitions. I personally enjoy multi-syllabic rappers. Check out the video I've included, all of these guys are extremely talented in my opinion:

I agree you find the most substantial social/political or thoughtful lyrics with underground artists. I think this is true of any genre though. Signed rappers are also pressured to keep the old tropes going.

Yup, I agree!

Great video, I'll look up some of those artists I'm not familiar with. Eminem definitely had an influence on Multi-syllabic Rhyming and just set the bar higher. It would be great to see a video like this for some modern rap. You can skip to 2:58 to see rhyme columns for 2002's Lose Yourself:

https://www.youtube.com...
armoredcat
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11/15/2016 4:42:02 AM
Posted: 3 weeks ago
At 9/19/2016 1:22:30 AM, 1harderthanyouthink wrote:
I want to pose these questions on DDO, to see what answers I get. Not many people I know of here listen to much rap music, so I think the answers I get here could be an interesting point for discussion regardless of who it comes from.

I want anyone who comes across this thread to answer the questions, whether or not they are a common listener of rap music.

Do you think rap music's subject matter is violent? Why do you think that?

It can be, but you have to accept dat when you listen

If you answered yes to the above, do you think that is inherent?

not always, usually

If you answered no to the above, why do you think people believe that?

idk
---

Do you think rappers are generally misogynists, or want to strengthen women in society?

misogynist lines, though i dont consider them misogynists. mostly. once again, something you gotta listen thru
If you answered yes to the above, how many rappers are you basing that answer off of? Are they popular, or lesser known?


lil wayne, even though i think hes good. kendrick, eminem, jay, they all had misogynist lines.
---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact in music? Why?

positive. its amazing in how intelligent ppl can be rapping. im an aspiring rapper myself. wordplay in rap is amazing.

Do you believe rap is music?


yes, of course. dats not even a question.

Do you believe rap music ought to be considered art?


yeah
---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on black American culture? Why?


positive, it's helped them express the troubles they had
---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on overall American culture? Why?

once again, it helped them state how they feel
---

Why do you think rap has declined in concentration of political content since the 1990s? Did you know prior to right now that this decline has happened?

i didn't see the decline there
---

I look forward to any answers.
xus00HAY
Posts: 1,390
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11/26/2016 2:27:11 AM
Posted: 1 week ago
Rap is not music ,it is a type of noise.
This may be a matter of opinion, but that is what it sounds like to me and many other people.
ShabShoral
Posts: 3,235
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12/1/2016 6:28:05 AM
Posted: 1 week ago
At 9/19/2016 1:22:30 AM, 1harderthanyouthink wrote:
I want to pose these questions on DDO, to see what answers I get. Not many people I know of here listen to much rap music, so I think the answers I get here could be an interesting point for discussion regardless of who it comes from.

I want anyone who comes across this thread to answer the questions, whether or not they are a common listener of rap music.

Do you think rap music's subject matter is violent? Why do you think that?
Some rap is.
If you answered yes to the above, do you think that is inherent?
No, by the nature of "some".
If you answered no to the above, why do you think people believe that?
Because a large amount of it is, and, more importantly, the majority of popular rap is.
---

Do you think rappers are generally misogynists, or want to strengthen women in society?
Neither.
If you answered yes to the above, how many rappers are you basing that answer off of? Are they popular, or lesser known?

---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact in music? Why?
Neutral. The rap I like I really like; the rap I don't I really dislike.
Do you believe rap is music?
Sure?
Do you believe rap music ought to be considered art?
Sure
---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on black American culture? Why?
Overall, negative. Much of it glorifies a life that should be avoided at all costs.
---

Do you think rap has had a positive, negative, or neutral impact on overall American culture? Why?
Same as above.
---

Why do you think rap has declined in concentration of political content since the 1990s? Did you know prior to right now that this decline has happened?
$$$.

Yes.
---

I look forward to any answers.
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GrimlyF
Posts: 93
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12/4/2016 2:05:22 AM
Posted: 4 days ago
Rap isn't "music". How many instrumental Rap songs have made No1 in the charts?. Hah hah hah. You laugh at the stupid question, " Raps about the lyrics, man, not the mus........And there you pause because Rap has little to do with music except as background noise to move to. Rap is little more than stream-of-consciousness, wishful thinking. Rap fans get to be tough, manly men for 3minutes and then back to their mundane, weedy little lives. Yes, they'd slap that bitch, shoot that cop and own that car for 3mins. Decades ago it was said of Fred Astaire " can't sing, can't act, can dance a little. Rap " stars" also "can't sing,can't dance and can't act".
See the happy moron: he doesn't give a damn:I wish I were a moron:My God! perhaps I am!. Anonymous.