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Google Wave for Debating?

KRFournier
Posts: 690
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7/8/2009 6:56:43 PM
Posted: 7 years ago
For those that have not heard of Google Wave, there is a preview at http://wave.google.com....

Essentially, it's a very free-form and flexible way to communicate and collaborate. It got me thinking about debate styles and formatting. For instance, some people really like to debate line-by-line, which of course gets tedious when you have to re-read the opponent's content every round. With Google wave, you could just insert comments right in line and use the "playback" feature to follow the flow of discussion. Could be interesting.

I'm curious what others think. I am not proposing this as a change to DDO as we all know DDO will not be changed anytime soon. I'm more interested in this on a theoretical level. If you have time, I encourage you to watch the demo (it's long) as it is really the only way to appreciate Google Wave's aspirations.
ChristianM
Posts: 1,764
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7/8/2009 6:58:22 PM
Posted: 7 years ago
At 7/8/2009 6:56:43 PM, KRFournier wrote:
For those that have not heard of Google Wave, there is a preview at http://wave.google.com....

Essentially, it's a very free-form and flexible way to communicate and collaborate. It got me thinking about debate styles and formatting. For instance, some people really like to debate line-by-line, which of course gets tedious when you have to re-read the opponent's content every round. With Google wave, you could just insert comments right in line and use the "playback" feature to follow the flow of discussion. Could be interesting.

I'm curious what others think. I am not proposing this as a change to DDO as we all know DDO will not be changed anytime soon. I'm more interested in this on a theoretical level. If you have time, I encourage you to watch the demo (it's long) as it is really the only way to appreciate Google Wave's aspirations.

Well as you said KRF, its more of a live thing. Which means you would have to make plans in order to debate someone.
wjmelements
Posts: 8,206
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7/8/2009 7:00:50 PM
Posted: 7 years ago
I'm so used to this format, I don't think I'd be tolerant of an alternative.
in the blink of an eye you finally see the light
KRFournier
Posts: 690
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7/8/2009 10:42:13 PM
Posted: 7 years ago
At 7/8/2009 6:58:22 PM, usafkid1121 wrote:

Well as you said KRF, its more of a live thing. Which means you would have to make plans in order to debate someone.

On the contrary, waves are persisted online. The demo focuses on how waves stay up to date in real time when users simultaneously add to it, but it need not be that way. In fact, the inspiration for wave was to merge the back-and-forth nature of email with the free form nature of instant messaging.

As for whether or not it's good for debate, I might agree with wjmelements that it might not be suitable for formal debates. Theoretically, if I were to imagine something like Google Wave incorporated into DDO, it would be an option. I've always felt that users should be able to create debates in a format that suites their tastes. After all, there are plenty of LD debaters that I imagine would love an LD debate format. The wave format could be ideal for very informal debates focused on play-by-play interchange.
Rolf
Posts: 1
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8/4/2009 1:06:33 PM
Posted: 7 years ago
Speaking for myself (not Google):

Some Google Wave benefits for friendly debates include:

1. As mentioned, contextual replying to a specific sentence is easy.

2. If you happen to be online at the same time, by default you can see what the other person's composing. If you see notice them composing a long message explaining the evidence that Paris is the capital of France (which they think proves abortion is right/wrong), if you're feeling nice you can tell them you agree that Paris is the capital of France and save them the time of composing their long message.

3. Contextual spellchecking (Lars' example is that "icland is an icland" resolves to "Iceland is an island")

4. Extensibility; for example, a third party could add a robot to do fact-checking. Another third-party could add an extension for voting, still another might have an extension allowing kibitzers to contextually comment and allowing a debater to import a kibitz comment into the main debate).