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Understanding Geo

Wallstreetatheist
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3/21/2013 1:30:57 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
5 Unexpected Downsides of High Intelligence...... #2. You're More Likely to Believe Bullsh!t

We're sure that at some point, someone has told you that you can't get anywhere without an education, and for the most part, they're right. And you're much more likely to pursue that education if you're starting out with a high IQ. According to renowned intelligenceologists who painstakingly measured every goddamn thing that you can associate with IQ, test scores were "the best single predictor of an individual's years of education."

Why? Well, their theory goes that smarter students do better in school (Cracked breaks new ground yet again!), which leads to more encouragement from teachers and parents, which in turn leads to more motivation to stay in school, then yadda yadda yadda, bingo-bango, master's degree in economics!
So What's the Problem?
It turns out that all this book learnin' is teaching you more than just the Pythagorean theorem -- it's also making it easier for you to believe some laughably wrong and even seriously weird stuff.

One problem is that education leads to one overall inaccurate belief: You think you're smarter than you are. Three studies have found that people who fall for investment scams are better-educated than the average person but don't seek advice because they think they're immune to making mistakes. In one study, researchers found that 94 percent of college professors think their work is superior to their peers'. These fellows fail to realize that intelligence doesn't always translate to real-world ability, and thus they tend to overestimate the quality of their work.

Whoa! Sure is getting crowded at the smart end of the bell curve. Right, guys?
It seems to go back to the old saying about how the wisest man is the one who realizes he knows nothing. Or, as Michael Shermer, the author of Why People Believe Weird Things, puts it: "Smart people believe weird things because they are skilled at defending beliefs they arrived at for non-smart reasons."
That's why the more education you get, the more likely you are to believe in, say, ghosts and the supernatural. One study found that 23 percent of college freshman believed in the paranormal, compared with 31 percent of seniors and 34 percent of graduate students. Which leads us to wonder ... what the fvck are schools teaching these days?

Source: http://www.cracked.com...
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Primal Diet. Lifting. Reading. Psychedelics. Cold-Approach Pickup. Music.
Wallstreetatheist
Posts: 7,132
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3/21/2013 1:32:10 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
I don't hate Geo; I merely think he believes some laughably ridiculous stuff.
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Primal Diet. Lifting. Reading. Psychedelics. Cold-Approach Pickup. Music.
RyuuKyuzo
Posts: 3,074
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3/21/2013 1:37:52 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/21/2013 1:30:57 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
5 Unexpected Downsides of High Intelligence...... #2. You're More Likely to Believe Bullsh!t

We're sure that at some point, someone has told you that you can't get anywhere without an education, and for the most part, they're right. And you're much more likely to pursue that education if you're starting out with a high IQ. According to renowned intelligenceologists who painstakingly measured every goddamn thing that you can associate with IQ, test scores were "the best single predictor of an individual's years of education."


Why? Well, their theory goes that smarter students do better in school (Cracked breaks new ground yet again!), which leads to more encouragement from teachers and parents, which in turn leads to more motivation to stay in school, then yadda yadda yadda, bingo-bango, master's degree in economics!
So What's the Problem?
It turns out that all this book learnin' is teaching you more than just the Pythagorean theorem -- it's also making it easier for you to believe some laughably wrong and even seriously weird stuff.


One problem is that education leads to one overall inaccurate belief: You think you're smarter than you are. Three studies have found that people who fall for investment scams are better-educated than the average person but don't seek advice because they think they're immune to making mistakes. In one study, researchers found that 94 percent of college professors think their work is superior to their peers'. These fellows fail to realize that intelligence doesn't always translate to real-world ability, and thus they tend to overestimate the quality of their work.


Whoa! Sure is getting crowded at the smart end of the bell curve. Right, guys?
It seems to go back to the old saying about how the wisest man is the one who realizes he knows nothing. Or, as Michael Shermer, the author of Why People Believe Weird Things, puts it: "Smart people believe weird things because they are skilled at defending beliefs they arrived at for non-smart reasons."
That's why the more education you get, the more likely you are to believe in, say, ghosts and the supernatural. One study found that 23 percent of college freshman believed in the paranormal, compared with 31 percent of seniors and 34 percent of graduate students. Which leads us to wonder ... what the fvck are schools teaching these days?


Source: http://www.cracked.com...

This is why I started debating. I didn't want to end up wrapped in a fog of my own ideology so thick that no amount of reason or facts could reach me. I figured the best way to do this is to constantly hammer-out any flaws in my world view via constant conflict in the world of debate.
If you're reading this, you're awesome and you should feel awesome.
Wallstreetatheist
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3/21/2013 1:52:23 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/21/2013 1:37:52 AM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
This is why I started debating. I didn't want to end up wrapped in a fog of my own ideology so thick that no amount of reason or facts could reach me. I figured the best way to do this is to constantly hammer-out any flaws in my world view via constant conflict in the world of debate.

Stay strong, bruthah! Remind yourself that every day you spend refining and hammering the iron sword of your reasoning is a day you don't spend being Geo or Charles. Now go my son, learn more advanced symbolic logic, make haste!
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GeoLaureate8
Posts: 12,252
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3/21/2013 2:24:03 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
1. It is assumed that I don't change or shed beliefs. My many years of debating have resulted in me refining my worldview, sharpening my critical thinking skills, focusing on new areas and dropping focus on things that are less tangible. As the years go by, my position is refined and the tangible basis grows.

2. I think we should really ask why normal people believe normal things. These are the most unjustified beliefs of all. One might think, "Reptilians, obviously ludicrous and ridiculous, that is definitely outside the norm." Introduce holographic theory, overlapping parallel universes, and interdimensional frequencies and it is no longer far-fetched. Famous physicist, Dr. Michio Kaku said that because we are tuned to one frequency, there may be in fact dinosaurs in your living room and you wouldn't even notice. You might say "but there's no evidence." Perhaps, but one barrier put up by "skeptics" and normal people has just been shattered. The presumption that such postulations of interdimensional aliens is ridiculous and unlikely is now shattered. It is in fact rather likely and make sense given the new context of understanding of modern physics.

Source: www.youtube.com/watch?v=rVWWQKU_-G0

3. People have what is called normalcy bias. "The normalcy bias, or normality bias, refers to a mental state people enter when facing a disaster. It causes people to underestimate both the possibility of a disaster occurring and its possible effects. This often results in situations where people fail to adequately prepare for a disaster, and on a larger scale, the failure of governments to include the populace in its disaster preparations. The assumption that is made in the case of the normalcy bias is that since a disaster never has occurred then it never will occur. It also results in the inability of people to cope with a disaster once it occurs. People with a normalcy bias have difficulties reacting to something they have not experienced before. People also tend to interpret warnings in the most optimistic way possible, seizing on any ambiguities to infer a less serious situation."

http://en.wikipedia.org...

A perfect example of this is when academic professor, Alan Dershowitz said after Alex Jones rant on CNN, "people don't want to believe their government is carrying out these atrocities." Exactly. His attempt to discredit Alex Jones backfired.
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
Wnope
Posts: 6,924
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3/21/2013 4:35:51 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I'll be honest...this entire thread is pretty douche-bag-ish.

It kind reminds me of white people explaining why black people think the way they do.
imabench
Posts: 21,230
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3/21/2013 4:49:39 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
where exactly did geo say this?
Kevin24018 : "He's just so mean it makes me want to ball up my fists and stamp on the ground"
Geogeer: "Nobody is dumb enough to become my protege."

7/14/16 = The Presidency Dies

DDO: THE MOVIE = http://www.debate.org...
http://www.debate.org...

VP of DDO from Dec 14th 2014 to Jan 1st 2015
000ike
Posts: 11,196
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3/21/2013 4:54:05 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
being a heretic that's mistaken is better than being a contrarian attention whore.

Eating up any conspiracy about any public figure or event and broadcasting it as fact at first whiff,.... I'm not sure how anyone can say geo isn't the latter.
"A stupid despot may constrain his slaves with iron chains; but a true politician binds them even more strongly with the chain of their own ideas" - Michel Foucault
GeoLaureate8
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3/21/2013 5:06:21 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/21/2013 4:54:05 PM, 000ike wrote:
being a heretic that's mistaken is better than being a contrarian attention whore.

Eating up any conspiracy about any public figure or event and broadcasting it as fact at first whiff,.... I'm not sure how anyone can say geo isn't the latter.

False. I don't believe in moon landing hoax theory, Bigfoot, lochness monster, Roswell crash, Jewish conspiracies, the no-plane 9/11 conspiracy, the number-coincidence theories, etc.
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
imabench
Posts: 21,230
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3/21/2013 5:22:37 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/21/2013 5:06:21 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
At 3/21/2013 4:54:05 PM, 000ike wrote:
being a heretic that's mistaken is better than being a contrarian attention whore.

Eating up any conspiracy about any public figure or event and broadcasting it as fact at first whiff,.... I'm not sure how anyone can say geo isn't the latter.

False. I don't believe in moon landing hoax theory,

but you do believe the moon itself is fake...

Bigfoot, lochness monster,

Didnt you say that its credible to believe that George Bush is a reptile from another multiverse or something?

Roswell crash, Jewish conspiracies,

but you do have doubts that antisemitism has never existed....

the no-plane 9/11 conspiracy,

but you do believe in a lot of other 9/11 conspiracies besides the no-plane theory yes?

the number-coincidence theories, etc.
Kevin24018 : "He's just so mean it makes me want to ball up my fists and stamp on the ground"
Geogeer: "Nobody is dumb enough to become my protege."

7/14/16 = The Presidency Dies

DDO: THE MOVIE = http://www.debate.org...
http://www.debate.org...

VP of DDO from Dec 14th 2014 to Jan 1st 2015
GeoLaureate8
Posts: 12,252
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3/21/2013 5:47:39 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/21/2013 5:22:37 PM, imabench wrote:
At 3/21/2013 5:06:21 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
At 3/21/2013 4:54:05 PM, 000ike wrote:
being a heretic that's mistaken is better than being a contrarian attention whore.

Eating up any conspiracy about any public figure or event and broadcasting it as fact at first whiff,.... I'm not sure how anyone can say geo isn't the latter.

False. I don't believe in moon landing hoax theory,

but you do believe the moon itself is fake...

No. Russian scientists said it's artificial and hollow.

Bigfoot, lochness monster,

Didnt you say that its credible to believe that George Bush is a reptile from another multiverse or something?

Not quite.

Roswell crash, Jewish conspiracies,

but you do have doubts that antisemitism has never existed....

I don't believe anti-Semitism is prevalent or significant in recent times. Clearly the Holocaust was anti-Semitic and a small number of racist people are anti-Semitic. But as Noam Chomsky points out, anti-Semitism is largely blown out of proportion.

the no-plane 9/11 conspiracy,

but you do believe in a lot of other 9/11 conspiracies besides the no-plane theory yes?

Michael Springman, head of the Visa Dept. admitted that the CIA and DoD told them to let the hijackers into America, Dick Cheney took control of NORAD right before 9/11, and the 9/11 Commission Chairman said the government agreed to lie to the public about 9/11.

The point is, I don't believe in every conspiracy theory.
"We must raise the standard of the Old, free, decentralized, and strictly limited Republic."
-- Murray Rothbard

"The worst thing that can happen to a good cause is, not to be skillfully attacked, but to be ineptly defended."
-- Frederic Bastiat
sadolite
Posts: 8,842
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3/21/2013 9:09:16 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
Highly intellectual people will defend failed ideas and policies to such lengths that they will convince themselves to the contrary rather than admit they are wrong. Washington DC is my source and it is run and controlled by intellectuals. Every single program that Washington has introduced is a complete failure and bankrupt. Yet "all" want to keep them in place and continue to fund them as they are. Reform just means rename it and business as usual. It is nearly impossible for an intellectual to admit they made a mistake or failed. They would rather live a lie. (opinion) The trademark of an intellectuals ideas being challenged is always the same. Marginalize and personal insult the character and intellegence of the questioner. (opinion through years of personal experience and observation)
It's not your views that divide us, it's what you think my views should be that divides us.

If you think I will give up my rights and forsake social etiquette to make you "FEEL" better you are sadly mistaken

If liberal democrats would just stop shooting people gun violence would drop by 90%
YYW
Posts: 36,392
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3/21/2013 9:19:30 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/21/2013 1:32:10 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
I don't hate Geo; I merely think he believes some laughably ridiculous stuff.

I don't hate him either (or even disagree with any of the points you've raised), but this thread was kind of douchy.
Tsar of DDO
Wallstreetatheist
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3/22/2013 12:10:47 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/21/2013 9:19:30 PM, YYW wrote:
At 3/21/2013 1:32:10 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
I don't hate Geo; I merely think he believes some laughably ridiculous stuff.

I don't hate him either (or even disagree with any of the points you've raised), but this thread was kind of douchy.

I perceived that risk when I made the post. I don't regret posting this though.
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YYW
Posts: 36,392
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3/22/2013 12:17:16 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/22/2013 12:10:47 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
At 3/21/2013 9:19:30 PM, YYW wrote:
At 3/21/2013 1:32:10 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
I don't hate Geo; I merely think he believes some laughably ridiculous stuff.

I don't hate him either (or even disagree with any of the points you've raised), but this thread was kind of douchy.

I perceived that risk when I made the post. I don't regret posting this though.


Fair enough.
Tsar of DDO
RyuuKyuzo
Posts: 3,074
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3/22/2013 10:54:48 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/22/2013 12:17:16 AM, YYW wrote:
At 3/22/2013 12:10:47 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
At 3/21/2013 9:19:30 PM, YYW wrote:
At 3/21/2013 1:32:10 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
I don't hate Geo; I merely think he believes some laughably ridiculous stuff.

I don't hate him either (or even disagree with any of the points you've raised), but this thread was kind of douchy.

I perceived that risk when I made the post. I don't regret posting this though.


Fair enough.

I perceived that risk when I killed those kids. I don't regret killing them though.
.
.
Fair enough.
If you're reading this, you're awesome and you should feel awesome.
Wallstreetatheist
Posts: 7,132
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3/22/2013 11:22:35 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/22/2013 10:54:48 AM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 3/22/2013 12:17:16 AM, YYW wrote:
At 3/22/2013 12:10:47 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
At 3/21/2013 9:19:30 PM, YYW wrote:
At 3/21/2013 1:32:10 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
I don't hate Geo; I merely think he believes some laughably ridiculous stuff.

I don't hate him either (or even disagree with any of the points you've raised), but this thread was kind of douchy.

I perceived that risk when I made the post. I don't regret posting this though.


Fair enough.

I perceived that risk when I killed those kids. I don't regret killing them though.
.
.
Fair enough.

Reductio ad absurdum
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RyuuKyuzo
Posts: 3,074
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3/22/2013 11:44:14 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/22/2013 11:22:35 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
At 3/22/2013 10:54:48 AM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 3/22/2013 12:17:16 AM, YYW wrote:
At 3/22/2013 12:10:47 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
At 3/21/2013 9:19:30 PM, YYW wrote:
At 3/21/2013 1:32:10 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
I don't hate Geo; I merely think he believes some laughably ridiculous stuff.

I don't hate him either (or even disagree with any of the points you've raised), but this thread was kind of douchy.

I perceived that risk when I made the post. I don't regret posting this though.


Fair enough.

I perceived that risk when I killed those kids. I don't regret killing them though.
.
.
Fair enough.

Reductio ad absurdum

can be a valid form of argumentation.
If you're reading this, you're awesome and you should feel awesome.
Wallstreetatheist
Posts: 7,132
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3/22/2013 12:04:16 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/22/2013 11:44:14 AM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 3/22/2013 11:22:35 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
At 3/22/2013 10:54:48 AM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 3/22/2013 12:17:16 AM, YYW wrote:
At 3/22/2013 12:10:47 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
At 3/21/2013 9:19:30 PM, YYW wrote:
At 3/21/2013 1:32:10 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
I don't hate Geo; I merely think he believes some laughably ridiculous stuff.

I don't hate him either (or even disagree with any of the points you've raised), but this thread was kind of douchy.

I perceived that risk when I made the post. I don't regret posting this though.


Fair enough.

I perceived that risk when I killed those kids. I don't regret killing them though.
.
.
Fair enough.

Reductio ad absurdum

can be a valid form of argumentation

when it builds on assertions which are actually present in the argument it is deconstructing
DRUG HARM: http://imgur.com...
Primal Diet. Lifting. Reading. Psychedelics. Cold-Approach Pickup. Music.
RyuuKyuzo
Posts: 3,074
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3/22/2013 12:08:16 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/22/2013 12:04:16 PM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
At 3/22/2013 11:44:14 AM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 3/22/2013 11:22:35 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
At 3/22/2013 10:54:48 AM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 3/22/2013 12:17:16 AM, YYW wrote:
At 3/22/2013 12:10:47 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
At 3/21/2013 9:19:30 PM, YYW wrote:
At 3/21/2013 1:32:10 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
I don't hate Geo; I merely think he believes some laughably ridiculous stuff.

I don't hate him either (or even disagree with any of the points you've raised), but this thread was kind of douchy.

I perceived that risk when I made the post. I don't regret posting this though.


Fair enough.

I perceived that risk when I killed those kids. I don't regret killing them though.
.
.
Fair enough.

Reductio ad absurdum

can be a valid form of argumentation

when it builds on assertions which are actually present in the argument it is deconstructing

If you don't think this is a valid use of reductio, we can debate it.
If you're reading this, you're awesome and you should feel awesome.
RoyLatham
Posts: 4,488
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3/22/2013 12:31:31 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
I think everyone has to build an intellectual model of the world to provide quick answers to problems. If we endlessly pondered every question we'd freeze up and never get anything done. The instinct of intellectual model building is then applied to answer questions when the only really appropriate answer is "I don't know." The human survival advantage is in forming theories, and it works on average even though many theories are wrong.

I think Shermer has it right. Smart people are better at rationalizing nuts theories. Universities have the additional problem that profs are in fact extremely knowledgeable about some things. They then improperly generalize that to believing the know everything. The Union of Concerned Scientists makes a living by getting Nobel laureates to sign onto idiotic statements about things outside of the Nobels' expertise.

The traditional purpose of religion was to explain things that could not be explained logically, like why it rains or why volcanoes erupt. Fantastic ideologies now have taken over that function.
Double_R
Posts: 4,886
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3/22/2013 2:37:05 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/21/2013 2:24:03 AM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
2. I think we should really ask why normal people believe normal things. These are the most unjustified beliefs of all. One might think, "Reptilians, obviously ludicrous and ridiculous, that is definitely outside the norm." Introduce holographic theory, overlapping parallel universes, and interdimensional frequencies and it is no longer far-fetched. Famous physicist, Dr. Michio Kaku said that because we are tuned to one frequency, there may be in fact dinosaurs in your living room and you wouldn't even notice. You might say "but there's no evidence." Perhaps, but one barrier put up by "skeptics" and normal people has just been shattered. The presumption that such postulations of interdimensional aliens is ridiculous and unlikely is now shattered. It is in fact rather likely and make sense given the new context of understanding of modern physics.

I think you just made the OP's point. The difference between the beliefs of "intelligent people" vs. "normal people" is often that normal people base their beliefs on what is real to their 5 senses, while intelligent people tend to rely mostly on their own intellect as a 6th sense. This can be really good, or really bad depending on how they use it.

Look at what you just said. Sure dinosaurs in our living room is scientifically conceivable, however no one can prove this is real. It is just a concept made up by some "smart" guys who then rationalized it. To find out whether our "smart" theories are real we perform science experiments. Most of these experiments fail because as much intelligence as it took to get to that point, there are almost always factors we didn't anticipate. So in the end, until our beliefs are proven they will always be based on nothing more then what we are willing to accept.

Which brings us to your conspiracy theories. You can sit and rationalize them all you want, but I highly doubt you have ever experienced anything that justifies your belief that they are real in the world you actually live in. Take 911 as an example. If it was the work of Bush and his cronies then there would be literally thousands of co-conspirators living among us with the knowledge that they participated in the murder of 3,000 innocent people, yet none of them has ever spoken about it. Have you ever met anyone who would agree to that? I highly doubt that, yet you accept it anyway because you have rationalized it. In other words you dismiss what your life experience has demonstrated to you to believe what your "intelligence" is telling you. Well you are not the only intelligent person out there, and many intelligent people disagree with your rationalizing so perhaps you should give your real life experiences a little more weight.
RyuuKyuzo
Posts: 3,074
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3/22/2013 4:05:23 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/22/2013 12:08:16 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 3/22/2013 12:04:16 PM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
At 3/22/2013 11:44:14 AM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 3/22/2013 11:22:35 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
At 3/22/2013 10:54:48 AM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 3/22/2013 12:17:16 AM, YYW wrote:
At 3/22/2013 12:10:47 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
At 3/21/2013 9:19:30 PM, YYW wrote:
At 3/21/2013 1:32:10 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
I don't hate Geo; I merely think he believes some laughably ridiculous stuff.

I don't hate him either (or even disagree with any of the points you've raised), but this thread was kind of douchy.

I perceived that risk when I made the post. I don't regret posting this though.


Fair enough.

I perceived that risk when I killed those kids. I don't regret killing them though.
.
.
Fair enough.

Reductio ad absurdum

can be a valid form of argumentation

when it builds on assertions which are actually present in the argument it is deconstructing

If you don't think this is a valid use of reductio, we can debate it.

http://cdn.memegenerator.net...
If you're reading this, you're awesome and you should feel awesome.
sadolite
Posts: 8,842
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3/22/2013 7:08:32 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
"You should give your real life experiences a little more weight."

Exactly. Now lets take a look at "real life results" that have come from......................
They are irrefutable. That is, if you are going to be intellectually honest.
It's not your views that divide us, it's what you think my views should be that divides us.

If you think I will give up my rights and forsake social etiquette to make you "FEEL" better you are sadly mistaken

If liberal democrats would just stop shooting people gun violence would drop by 90%
mattrodstrom
Posts: 12,028
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3/22/2013 11:42:53 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/21/2013 5:06:21 PM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
the no-plane 9/11 conspiracy, the number-coincidence theories, etc.

I'm pretty sure I heard you going on about missiles..
at the Very Least regarding the Pentagon explosion.
"He who does not know how to put his will into things at least puts a meaning into them: that is, he believes there is a will in them already."

Metaphysics:
"The science.. which deals with the fundamental errors of mankind - but as if they were the fundamental truths."
RyuuKyuzo
Posts: 3,074
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3/23/2013 2:10:20 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/22/2013 4:05:23 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 3/22/2013 12:08:16 PM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 3/22/2013 12:04:16 PM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
At 3/22/2013 11:44:14 AM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 3/22/2013 11:22:35 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
At 3/22/2013 10:54:48 AM, RyuuKyuzo wrote:
At 3/22/2013 12:17:16 AM, YYW wrote:
At 3/22/2013 12:10:47 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
At 3/21/2013 9:19:30 PM, YYW wrote:
At 3/21/2013 1:32:10 AM, Wallstreetatheist wrote:
I don't hate Geo; I merely think he believes some laughably ridiculous stuff.

I don't hate him either (or even disagree with any of the points you've raised), but this thread was kind of douchy.

I perceived that risk when I made the post. I don't regret posting this though.


Fair enough.

I perceived that risk when I killed those kids. I don't regret killing them though.
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Fair enough.

Reductio ad absurdum

can be a valid form of argumentation

when it builds on assertions which are actually present in the argument it is deconstructing

If you don't think this is a valid use of reductio, we can debate it.

http://cdn.memegenerator.net...

I guess I scared him away...
If you're reading this, you're awesome and you should feel awesome.
muzebreak
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3/23/2013 2:21:08 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 3/21/2013 2:24:03 AM, GeoLaureate8 wrote:
1. It is assumed that I don't change or shed beliefs. My many years of debating have resulted in me refining my worldview, sharpening my critical thinking skills, focusing on new areas and dropping focus on things that are less tangible. As the years go by, my position is refined and the tangible basis grows.

2. I think we should really ask why normal people believe normal things. These are the most unjustified beliefs of all. One might think, "Reptilians, obviously ludicrous and ridiculous, that is definitely outside the norm." Introduce holographic theory, overlapping parallel universes, and interdimensional frequencies and it is no longer far-fetched. Famous physicist, Dr. Michio Kaku said that because we are tuned to one frequency, there may be in fact dinosaurs in your living room and you wouldn't even notice.

Yes, he did indeed say this. But that doesn't mean that this is actually possible. Just that according to a theory, or multiple theories, that make sense, and therefore might be true, it is possible for a dinosaur to be stomping around a point that corresponds spatially with your living room. This does not mean that this dinosaur can move from the dimension that it is in, to our, that it can even exist in our universe, or that it wants to control our political framework. Those are still far-fetched ideas.

You might say "but there's no evidence." Perhaps, but one barrier put up by "skeptics" and normal people has just been shattered. The presumption that such postulations of interdimensional aliens is ridiculous and unlikely is now shattered. It is in fact rather likely and make sense given the new context of understanding of modern physics.

Source: www.youtube.com/watch?v=rVWWQKU_-G0

3. People have what is called normalcy bias. "The normalcy bias, or normality bias, refers to a mental state people enter when facing a disaster. It causes people to underestimate both the possibility of a disaster occurring and its possible effects. This often results in situations where people fail to adequately prepare for a disaster, and on a larger scale, the failure of governments to include the populace in its disaster preparations. The assumption that is made in the case of the normalcy bias is that since a disaster never has occurred then it never will occur. It also results in the inability of people to cope with a disaster once it occurs. People with a normalcy bias have difficulties reacting to something they have not experienced before. People also tend to interpret warnings in the most optimistic way possible, seizing on any ambiguities to infer a less serious situation."

http://en.wikipedia.org...

A perfect example of this is when academic professor, Alan Dershowitz said after Alex Jones rant on CNN, "people don't want to believe their government is carrying out these atrocities." Exactly. His attempt to discredit Alex Jones backfired.
"Every kid starts out as a natural-born scientist, and then we beat it out of them. A few trickle through the system with their wonder and enthusiasm for science intact." - Carl Sagan

This is the response of the defenders of Sparta to the Commander of the Roman Army: "If you are a god, you will not hurt those who have never injured you. If you are a man, advance - you will find men equal to yourself. And women.