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Official DDO Book Thread!

Ajabi
Posts: 1,504
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12/15/2014 3:53:08 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
I thought this ought to be started. Our little family has, here, a plethora of knowledge. I know that a lot of us are avid readers, so why not share our suggestions? So this is a thread we can post the books we are currently reading, and a small summary/why others should read it.

This is also a place we can meet other people with reading similarities. We can question each other, and friends can decide to read the same book together. I hope this thread does not get derailed, please please please only discuss the books you would suggest, or others have suggested. Do not use this thread for personal discussions, please.

So here I'll start. I am currently on the following books.

1. Hamlet by William Shakespeare

I thought it was time to re-read this masterpiece. Its a beautiful tragic play written by William Shakespeare with his classic mixture of magical allusions, and universal drama and tragedy. It follows the Dane, and is set in Denmark. A combination of dynamic characters (Horatio <3), and full of beautiful soliloquys.

It is one of Shakespeare's more philosophical plays, especially when considered from an existential view. It questions what makes us do what we do, and who we are as a person. The famous lines "to be or not to be" are taken from this play only. A combination of skepticism, transcendence, and questions to the essence of humans, I'd say this Shakespeare at this absolute best.

2. Iqbal's Concept of God by Salman Raschid

Mohammed Iqbal was a Pakistani philosopher, and a devout student of McTaggart (under whom he received his doctorate). He first studied at Cambridge, until he left for Germany and spent numerous years there. After he came back to Pakistan, and established himself as one of the best poets of the Urdu language. While his poetry is beautiful I personally disagree with his philosophy, I find it contradictory, and misleading.

Iqbal denied all the proofs of God, and believed reason could not postulate a God. His epistemic position was a knock off Hegel at best. The book "Iqbal's Concept of God" is a harsh critique of Iqbal's concept of God, and his book "Reconstruction of Religious Thought In Islam".

Raschid is an alumni of Cambridge University, and has taught Philosophy at Harvard University. He is engaging, and one does not need to have read Iqbal to be able to appreciate his criticisms on Iqbal. It closely follows a religious (Islamic) and philosophical critique of Iqbal, which is harsh, yet amazingly logical, even if at times unfair.

3. The Collected Poems of William Butler Yeats

If you ask me, the Romanticists were nothing compared to Yeats. His poems are engaging, deeply though provoking, profoundly philosophical. His lines are beautiful, and read with a sadness, and a near transcendent beauty. The universal aspects of man are highlighted time and time again in his numerous poems.

"Sweetheart, do not love too long:
I loved long and long
And grew to be out of fashion
Like an old song.

All through the years of our youth
Neither could have known
Their own thought from the other's
We were so much at one.

But O, in a minute she changed -
O do not love too long,
Or you will grow out of fashion
Like an old song."

I hardly think there is anyone else who can compare to Yeats in the twenthieth century in matters of lyrical poems. He is truly spectacular. His poems range from epic, to lyrical, to moral, to sad.

Well this is me, I hope you like the above books if you choose to read them. All of them should be easily available. If you have any questions PM me or ask me here, or just share your own.

I do hope this thread takes off.
headphonegut
Posts: 4,122
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12/15/2014 4:47:10 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
Great thread mate.

This is it by Alan Watts

This book is a collection of essays by Watts and he focuses on the spiritual and its relation to ordinary life. And delves into what we need to do to realize that "this" is basically "it".

Linguistic Anthropology by Duranti

In this book he attempts to define, refocus, and explain the interdisciplinary need for linguistic anthropology. Its uses and practices in the context of anthropology. How it is important that we see it as an "essential role in mediating...aspects of human existence".

Wisdom sits in places by Keith H. Basso

Essentially an ethnographic book by Basso and his account of the Western Apache. Focusing on Places and their meaning to people, and how they (places' meaning) develop and change with time, specifically on the Weatern Apache. With commentary on the Western Apaches culture, insights into the psyche in the context of anthropology, and a brilliant and second to none in the way of recounting his travels with the Western Apache.

I recommend also reading Notes on the Balanese cockfight by Geertz A short article.
crying to soldiers coming home to their dogs why do I torment myself with these videos?
SebUK
Posts: 850
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12/15/2014 1:34:12 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 12/15/2014 3:53:08 AM, Ajabi wrote:
I thought this ought to be started. Our little family has, here, a plethora of knowledge. I know that a lot of us are avid readers, so why not share our suggestions? So this is a thread we can post the books we are currently reading, and a small summary/why others should read it.

This is also a place we can meet other people with reading similarities. We can question each other, and friends can decide to read the same book together. I hope this thread does not get derailed, please please please only discuss the books you would suggest, or others have suggested. Do not use this thread for personal discussions, please.

So here I'll start. I am currently on the following books.

1. Hamlet by William Shakespeare

I thought it was time to re-read this masterpiece. Its a beautiful tragic play written by William Shakespeare with his classic mixture of magical allusions, and universal drama and tragedy. It follows the Dane, and is set in Denmark. A combination of dynamic characters (Horatio <3), and full of beautiful soliloquys.

It is one of Shakespeare's more philosophical plays, especially when considered from an existential view. It questions what makes us do what we do, and who we are as a person. The famous lines "to be or not to be" are taken from this play only. A combination of skepticism, transcendence, and questions to the essence of humans, I'd say this Shakespeare at this absolute best.


2. Iqbal's Concept of God by Salman Raschid

Mohammed Iqbal was a Pakistani philosopher, and a devout student of McTaggart (under whom he received his doctorate). He first studied at Cambridge, until he left for Germany and spent numerous years there. After he came back to Pakistan, and established himself as one of the best poets of the Urdu language. While his poetry is beautiful I personally disagree with his philosophy, I find it contradictory, and misleading.

Iqbal denied all the proofs of God, and believed reason could not postulate a God. His epistemic position was a knock off Hegel at best. The book "Iqbal's Concept of God" is a harsh critique of Iqbal's concept of God, and his book "Reconstruction of Religious Thought In Islam".

Raschid is an alumni of Cambridge University, and has taught Philosophy at Harvard University. He is engaging, and one does not need to have read Iqbal to be able to appreciate his criticisms on Iqbal. It closely follows a religious (Islamic) and philosophical critique of Iqbal, which is harsh, yet amazingly logical, even if at times unfair.


3. The Collected Poems of William Butler Yeats

If you ask me, the Romanticists were nothing compared to Yeats. His poems are engaging, deeply though provoking, profoundly philosophical. His lines are beautiful, and read with a sadness, and a near transcendent beauty. The universal aspects of man are highlighted time and time again in his numerous poems.

"Sweetheart, do not love too long:
I loved long and long
And grew to be out of fashion
Like an old song.

All through the years of our youth
Neither could have known
Their own thought from the other's
We were so much at one.

But O, in a minute she changed -
O do not love too long,
Or you will grow out of fashion
Like an old song."

I hardly think there is anyone else who can compare to Yeats in the twenthieth century in matters of lyrical poems. He is truly spectacular. His poems range from epic, to lyrical, to moral, to sad.

Well this is me, I hope you like the above books if you choose to read them. All of them should be easily available. If you have any questions PM me or ask me here, or just share your own.

I do hope this thread takes off.

I would like to suggest a book I read a long time ago (*2* YEARS ;0 ) 'The Next 100 years' by George Friedman . It explains a lot about the trends currently happening and what they are likely to lead to .
I WILL DECIDE WHAT THIS DEBATE IS ABOUT. I AM SPIRITUAL, NOT RELIGIOYUS. YOU DONT HAVE TO BE RELIGIOUS TO BELIEVE IN GOD, AND YOU DO WORSHIP MONEY IF YOU CARE MORE ABOUT YOUR WALLET THAAN YOU DO THE POOR. YOU ARE A TROLL THAT IS OUT FOR ATTENTUION."- SitaraMusica
whiteflame
Posts: 1,378
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12/15/2014 6:03:53 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Alright, so I'll go ahead and post three of my favorite books here. These are among my absolute favorites, though certainly not alone in that regard. I'll be focusing on fiction here, as that has been my greatest interest of late.

1. Catch-22, by Joseph Heller

If I had to put one of these books at the top of my list, it would be this one. I read it back in high school and it's stuck with me as one of the most vivid reading experiences I've ever had. Some of you may have been required to read this for classes, and thus may have had a different experience from me, but I think it might be worth picking up again.

Catch-22 is a story regarding the insanity of war. Insanity is a key theme throughout the book, as the perspective remains on one character who is, without a doubt, insane. He's been driven insane by having to engage in multiple bombing raids, putting his life at great risk to kill many people. However, as he knows he is insane, he can't be discharged from the army, because only a sane person would know his own insanity. This tortured logic drags the reader into that insanity with the characters, as the story jumps between time points.

War itself also becomes a major underpinning of the book, as characters die pointless deaths, seek refuge from the truth in hallucination, and are eventually forced to acknowledge the real insanity of war that lurks beneath their own.

2. Cat's Cradle, by Kurt Vonnegut

Vonnegut is still my favorite author, and I've read practically everything he ever wrote. All of his books are relatively short and chock full of black humor, and they all spoil the ending early on, focusing on the journey to reach it. I could recommend great short stories like Welcome the Monkey House and Harrison Bergeron, or the mind-bending craziness that is the Sirens of Titan, but I would be remiss if I left out my favorite book of his here.

Cat's Cradle is narrated by the son of a quirky lead scientist who worked on the Manhattan Project. Tasked with creating a means for tanks and artillery to cross swamps, this scientist devised a chemical called Ice-9, which, when interacting with any body of water, would freeze it into a form that was akin to ice, only with a much higher melting temperature and much more solidity. And, as the book reveals, it has worked too well. All of the world's oceans, as well as their connected sources of water, have turned to Ice-9.

It's an incredible journey to reach that end, and one I feel anyone would be engrossed with.

3. Ready Player One, by Ernest Cline

Now, onto something more recent. This book is really the most fun for gamers and those who lived through the 80's, but take it from me, anyone can enjoy it immensely.

Imagine a world where we spend more time on our computers than in the real world. It doesn't seem so far away, given the easy availability of Internet sources. But realistically, we're still far off from it - most businesses function in real office buildings, people have to interact to go to school (for the most part), and in the end, all we're really doing is staring at a screen.

The setting in this book changes that. An eccentric game designer creates a new system called the Oasis, an interactive world where people are plunged into the online environment with visors and gloves that control their actions. It's a place where you can, almost literally, spend every waking moment. You can work, go to school, shop, play games, and even earning a living using its currency alone. The Oasis combines every aspect of the Internet with every game, movie, television, and yes, even book universe folded into one. A gigantic, almost never ending space where every experience is literally at your fingertips, if you have the money to access them, the Oasis is a startling leap forward that earned the company that conceived of it, and the eccentric owner, incomparable amounts of money. Much of this has come at the cost of the real world, where many problems such as fuel and housing are in horrible shape.

At the beginning of this story, that owner dies, leaving behind a video will given solely by his avatar. In it, he reveals that the sole inheritor of his fortune will be the person bright enough to locate a deeply hidden Easter egg found somewhere inside of the Oasis, on one of its innumerable planets in one of its innumerable universes. The clues to finding it lie in that owner's interests, which focus mainly on gaming and every bit of 80's trends and trivia. Tens of billions of dollars and ownership of the Oasis are at stake, and many search for it. Yet years drag on and no one, not a soul has found a clue as to where that Easter egg is hidden.

But a breakthrough does happen, and the race for the Easter egg begins in earnest.