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Feedback on related texts or reccomendations

famer
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2/7/2015 4:45:31 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
Hello everyone. I'd just like some feedback, of sorts in these two choices of these two related texts that I've chosen to utilize this year as part of my English study. For those who don't know, or at least just within the Australian education system, we follow a "module" or otherwise known as an "area of study". For years 2015-2019, we follow the "Discovery" module.

I was originally planning on using Ang Lee's film "Life of Pi" as a predominant related text to use this year, but only found out that this is a prescribed text available within other government schools and therefore I am not permitted to use it. Joy oh joy. So now I've been actively trying to find other useful texts that I could possibly use. I'll present the two that I've found. Just want some feedback on whether or not these would be good choices.

1. Diogenes -- by John William Waterhouse
Form: Neoclassicist oil painting

Whilst this somewhat historical oil painting (1882) does effectively demonstrate values of discovery, I'm not entirely sure if there's enough to talk about within an exam situation to outline all of the ideas within the written essay part. However, I feel as if the central element of materialistic obsession will at least work well for me for the time being because it contrasts well with the Robert Gray poem (my prescribed text) "North Coast Town" that epitomizes the overwhelming commercialization of the town. As outlined in a sample essay response that uses Diogene the discovery elements are clarified (NOT WRITTEN BY ME):

Waterhouse's 1882 Diogenes portrays a philosopher who rejects the superficial values of classical Greek society by living a life of self-denial. Diogenes' insights into the corruption of the fashionable world lead him to live in the Athenian marketplace and critique those who surrounded him. Waterhouse shows Diogenes in darkness and shadows, contrasting him with the idyllic depiction of the colorful females whose gazes are directed towards him. Juxtaposed with their joyous expressions, the philosopher appears morose, as his discoveries have led him to adopt a cynical attitude towards the World. Vectors leading to the shadows draw the responder's eyes towards Diogenes, and the brightness of the summer weather contrasts with his dark clothes and grim expression. Waterhouse demonstrates that intellectual discoveries do not always lead to happiness, and that individuals who are oblivious to problems in the world around them may lead a life of ignorant happiness.

Second text I've been seriously considering is

2. Sword Art Online (SEASON 1 ONLY)
Form: Japanese animation series (Not going to use the manga version)

Oh yes that's right, despite seeing some SAO themed mafias/discussions/debates out there, this choice came to me on my own accord about a week ago. Different elements of discovery (arguably) are presented, or at least can utilize logical arguments to prove the existence of discovery themes. Some parts that I've decided to possibly use include

- the reality of Kirito v.s. Asuna's relationship within SAO. Contrast between virtual gaming experience and the external reality due to a 2-year long experience within the virtual reality.
- The triangular family relationship between Kirito, Asuna and Yui. The unasked, confronting discovery of Yui being the incredible product of artificial intelligence.
- SAO, the new reality (?). Can't quite remember which episode, but sometime near the scene when Kirito/Asuna dine on the S-Type ingredient and Asuna discusses that the 2-year long stay within SAO have caused majority of SAO players to live in it as their own reality, abandoning the external reality, outside of their Nerve-Gear (Can't be bothered to clear the game, lose their lives in the Front Line etc.)

Whilst these two texts are rather questionable in nature, I'd just like osme feedback on the reliability to use these texts for an overall module-based study on Discovery? Just to note that the element of Discovery has to be rather open-ended to enable a suitable answer within any question in relationship to discovery. E.g.:

1. Has the discovery changed the person
2. Is it an unexpected discovery or an carefully planned discovery?
3. What influenced the discovery?

And so forth. Please just give me an idea on whether or not it'd be suitable to use in an exam situation/good for study.

And, if there is any kind of text that you would recommend, please let me know the text, form and a brief summary of the element/presentation of discovery and how it's conveyed.

Cheers for anyone that helps out/bothered to read all of this.
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