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American exceptionalism on DDO

Philocat
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3/25/2015 3:59:55 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I'm not sure if exceptionalism is the best word for this phenomenon, but it's the closest word I can think of.

But anyway, what I've noticed on here is that a lot of people, in debates, forums or polls, act as if America is the only country in the world. Examples of this being:

1. People assuming, in debates regarding legalisation, that the debate is concerning American legislation even if that is not specified.

2. People citing statistics just about the USA and seeing them as an acceptable source even when the debate does not particularly pertain to the USA.

3. People using 'X is legal' to mean the same thing as 'X is legal in the USA'.

4. People referring to 'our country' or 'our constitution'. In other words, people assuming that the person they are conversing with is also an American.

5. People using constitutional arguments. For example, often I see debates on gay marriage where people state that 'the constitution demands that gay people be allowed to get married', yet they often use such arguments even if it is not specified whether the debate is about gay marriage in America, or even that their opponent is American and actually gives a damn what the constitution says.

6. People using American political jargon such as 'common core' and 'federal reserve'. I personally understand these terms, but it is a push to expect non-Americans to know these terms as if they are general knowledge. If I spoke to an American on here and used British political jargon such as 'the exchequer' or 'antidisestablishmentarianism' they would most likely get confused and throw a tantrum.

I know that there are a lot of Americans on DDO, but this is no excuse for presuming that America is the 'default' country or that everyone should exclusively care about the state of American society or government.

What brought this up is a debate I saw recently where someone used arguments that only apply to American society and then appeared to go on to reprimand their opponent for not specifying that they supposed to be discussing the issue worldwide and not just America.
This just goes to show how people will assume you are talking about America even if this is never even mentioned.
ConservativePolitico
Posts: 8,210
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3/25/2015 4:55:02 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/25/2015 3:59:55 PM, Philocat wrote:
I'm not sure if exceptionalism is the best word for this phenomenon, but it's the closest word I can think of.

But anyway, what I've noticed on here is that a lot of people, in debates, forums or polls, act as if America is the only country in the world. Examples of this being:

1. People assuming, in debates regarding legalisation, that the debate is concerning American legislation even if that is not specified.

2. People citing statistics just about the USA and seeing them as an acceptable source even when the debate does not particularly pertain to the USA.

3. People using 'X is legal' to mean the same thing as 'X is legal in the USA'.

4. People referring to 'our country' or 'our constitution'. In other words, people assuming that the person they are conversing with is also an American.

5. People using constitutional arguments. For example, often I see debates on gay marriage where people state that 'the constitution demands that gay people be allowed to get married', yet they often use such arguments even if it is not specified whether the debate is about gay marriage in America, or even that their opponent is American and actually gives a damn what the constitution says.

6. People using American political jargon such as 'common core' and 'federal reserve'. I personally understand these terms, but it is a push to expect non-Americans to know these terms as if they are general knowledge. If I spoke to an American on here and used British political jargon such as 'the exchequer' or 'antidisestablishmentarianism' they would most likely get confused and throw a tantrum.

I know that there are a lot of Americans on DDO, but this is no excuse for presuming that America is the 'default' country or that everyone should exclusively care about the state of American society or government.


What brought this up is a debate I saw recently where someone used arguments that only apply to American society and then appeared to go on to reprimand their opponent for not specifying that they supposed to be discussing the issue worldwide and not just America.
This just goes to show how people will assume you are talking about America even if this is never even mentioned.

The vast majority of us are American. Since we're talking to primarily other Americans we default to speaking colloquially about our country. If I had to tack on "in the US" or "I'm talking about America" to everything I said it'd be a hassle when most people know already. If they don't know, they ask, then we inform the person we're speaking about America. Simple.
Philocat
Posts: 728
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3/25/2015 5:16:32 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/25/2015 4:55:02 PM, ConservativePolitico wrote:
At 3/25/2015 3:59:55 PM, Philocat wrote:
I'm not sure if exceptionalism is the best word for this phenomenon, but it's the closest word I can think of.

But anyway, what I've noticed on here is that a lot of people, in debates, forums or polls, act as if America is the only country in the world. Examples of this being:

1. People assuming, in debates regarding legalisation, that the debate is concerning American legislation even if that is not specified.

2. People citing statistics just about the USA and seeing them as an acceptable source even when the debate does not particularly pertain to the USA.

3. People using 'X is legal' to mean the same thing as 'X is legal in the USA'.

4. People referring to 'our country' or 'our constitution'. In other words, people assuming that the person they are conversing with is also an American.

5. People using constitutional arguments. For example, often I see debates on gay marriage where people state that 'the constitution demands that gay people be allowed to get married', yet they often use such arguments even if it is not specified whether the debate is about gay marriage in America, or even that their opponent is American and actually gives a damn what the constitution says.

6. People using American political jargon such as 'common core' and 'federal reserve'. I personally understand these terms, but it is a push to expect non-Americans to know these terms as if they are general knowledge. If I spoke to an American on here and used British political jargon such as 'the exchequer' or 'antidisestablishmentarianism' they would most likely get confused and throw a tantrum.

I know that there are a lot of Americans on DDO, but this is no excuse for presuming that America is the 'default' country or that everyone should exclusively care about the state of American society or government.


What brought this up is a debate I saw recently where someone used arguments that only apply to American society and then appeared to go on to reprimand their opponent for not specifying that they supposed to be discussing the issue worldwide and not just America.
This just goes to show how people will assume you are talking about America even if this is never even mentioned.

The vast majority of us are American. Since we're talking to primarily other Americans we default to speaking colloquially about our country. If I had to tack on "in the US" or "I'm talking about America" to everything I said it'd be a hassle when most people know already. If they don't know, they ask, then we inform the person we're speaking about America. Simple.

I see why you think that, although it is still somewhat presumptuous to assume an American framework simply because most people on DDO are American.
ConservativePolitico
Posts: 8,210
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3/25/2015 5:17:40 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/25/2015 5:16:32 PM, Philocat wrote:
At 3/25/2015 4:55:02 PM, ConservativePolitico wrote:
At 3/25/2015 3:59:55 PM, Philocat wrote:
I'm not sure if exceptionalism is the best word for this phenomenon, but it's the closest word I can think of.

But anyway, what I've noticed on here is that a lot of people, in debates, forums or polls, act as if America is the only country in the world. Examples of this being:

1. People assuming, in debates regarding legalisation, that the debate is concerning American legislation even if that is not specified.

2. People citing statistics just about the USA and seeing them as an acceptable source even when the debate does not particularly pertain to the USA.

3. People using 'X is legal' to mean the same thing as 'X is legal in the USA'.

4. People referring to 'our country' or 'our constitution'. In other words, people assuming that the person they are conversing with is also an American.

5. People using constitutional arguments. For example, often I see debates on gay marriage where people state that 'the constitution demands that gay people be allowed to get married', yet they often use such arguments even if it is not specified whether the debate is about gay marriage in America, or even that their opponent is American and actually gives a damn what the constitution says.

6. People using American political jargon such as 'common core' and 'federal reserve'. I personally understand these terms, but it is a push to expect non-Americans to know these terms as if they are general knowledge. If I spoke to an American on here and used British political jargon such as 'the exchequer' or 'antidisestablishmentarianism' they would most likely get confused and throw a tantrum.

I know that there are a lot of Americans on DDO, but this is no excuse for presuming that America is the 'default' country or that everyone should exclusively care about the state of American society or government.


What brought this up is a debate I saw recently where someone used arguments that only apply to American society and then appeared to go on to reprimand their opponent for not specifying that they supposed to be discussing the issue worldwide and not just America.
This just goes to show how people will assume you are talking about America even if this is never even mentioned.

The vast majority of us are American. Since we're talking to primarily other Americans we default to speaking colloquially about our country. If I had to tack on "in the US" or "I'm talking about America" to everything I said it'd be a hassle when most people know already. If they don't know, they ask, then we inform the person we're speaking about America. Simple.

I see why you think that, although it is still somewhat presumptuous to assume an American framework simply because most people on DDO are American.

No its not. It's simply practical.
Philocat
Posts: 728
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3/25/2015 5:19:59 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/25/2015 5:17:40 PM, ConservativePolitico wrote:
At 3/25/2015 5:16:32 PM, Philocat wrote:
At 3/25/2015 4:55:02 PM, ConservativePolitico wrote:
At 3/25/2015 3:59:55 PM, Philocat wrote:
I'm not sure if exceptionalism is the best word for this phenomenon, but it's the closest word I can think of.

But anyway, what I've noticed on here is that a lot of people, in debates, forums or polls, act as if America is the only country in the world. Examples of this being:

1. People assuming, in debates regarding legalisation, that the debate is concerning American legislation even if that is not specified.

2. People citing statistics just about the USA and seeing them as an acceptable source even when the debate does not particularly pertain to the USA.

3. People using 'X is legal' to mean the same thing as 'X is legal in the USA'.

4. People referring to 'our country' or 'our constitution'. In other words, people assuming that the person they are conversing with is also an American.

5. People using constitutional arguments. For example, often I see debates on gay marriage where people state that 'the constitution demands that gay people be allowed to get married', yet they often use such arguments even if it is not specified whether the debate is about gay marriage in America, or even that their opponent is American and actually gives a damn what the constitution says.

6. People using American political jargon such as 'common core' and 'federal reserve'. I personally understand these terms, but it is a push to expect non-Americans to know these terms as if they are general knowledge. If I spoke to an American on here and used British political jargon such as 'the exchequer' or 'antidisestablishmentarianism' they would most likely get confused and throw a tantrum.

I know that there are a lot of Americans on DDO, but this is no excuse for presuming that America is the 'default' country or that everyone should exclusively care about the state of American society or government.


What brought this up is a debate I saw recently where someone used arguments that only apply to American society and then appeared to go on to reprimand their opponent for not specifying that they supposed to be discussing the issue worldwide and not just America.
This just goes to show how people will assume you are talking about America even if this is never even mentioned.

The vast majority of us are American. Since we're talking to primarily other Americans we default to speaking colloquially about our country. If I had to tack on "in the US" or "I'm talking about America" to everything I said it'd be a hassle when most people know already. If they don't know, they ask, then we inform the person we're speaking about America. Simple.

I see why you think that, although it is still somewhat presumptuous to assume an American framework simply because most people on DDO are American.

No its not. It's simply practical.

Well I'd say it's both ;)
ConservativePolitico
Posts: 8,210
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3/25/2015 5:21:47 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/25/2015 5:19:59 PM, Philocat wrote:
At 3/25/2015 5:17:40 PM, ConservativePolitico wrote:
At 3/25/2015 5:16:32 PM, Philocat wrote:
At 3/25/2015 4:55:02 PM, ConservativePolitico wrote:
At 3/25/2015 3:59:55 PM, Philocat wrote:
I'm not sure if exceptionalism is the best word for this phenomenon, but it's the closest word I can think of.

But anyway, what I've noticed on here is that a lot of people, in debates, forums or polls, act as if America is the only country in the world. Examples of this being:

1. People assuming, in debates regarding legalisation, that the debate is concerning American legislation even if that is not specified.

2. People citing statistics just about the USA and seeing them as an acceptable source even when the debate does not particularly pertain to the USA.

3. People using 'X is legal' to mean the same thing as 'X is legal in the USA'.

4. People referring to 'our country' or 'our constitution'. In other words, people assuming that the person they are conversing with is also an American.

5. People using constitutional arguments. For example, often I see debates on gay marriage where people state that 'the constitution demands that gay people be allowed to get married', yet they often use such arguments even if it is not specified whether the debate is about gay marriage in America, or even that their opponent is American and actually gives a damn what the constitution says.

6. People using American political jargon such as 'common core' and 'federal reserve'. I personally understand these terms, but it is a push to expect non-Americans to know these terms as if they are general knowledge. If I spoke to an American on here and used British political jargon such as 'the exchequer' or 'antidisestablishmentarianism' they would most likely get confused and throw a tantrum.

I know that there are a lot of Americans on DDO, but this is no excuse for presuming that America is the 'default' country or that everyone should exclusively care about the state of American society or government.


What brought this up is a debate I saw recently where someone used arguments that only apply to American society and then appeared to go on to reprimand their opponent for not specifying that they supposed to be discussing the issue worldwide and not just America.
This just goes to show how people will assume you are talking about America even if this is never even mentioned.

The vast majority of us are American. Since we're talking to primarily other Americans we default to speaking colloquially about our country. If I had to tack on "in the US" or "I'm talking about America" to everything I said it'd be a hassle when most people know already. If they don't know, they ask, then we inform the person we're speaking about America. Simple.

I see why you think that, although it is still somewhat presumptuous to assume an American framework simply because most people on DDO are American.

No its not. It's simply practical.

Well I'd say it's both ;)

Why is it presumptuous to talk from the default position of American to other Americans?
Philocat
Posts: 728
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3/25/2015 5:24:01 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/25/2015 5:21:47 PM, ConservativePolitico wrote:
At 3/25/2015 5:19:59 PM, Philocat wrote:
At 3/25/2015 5:17:40 PM, ConservativePolitico wrote:
At 3/25/2015 5:16:32 PM, Philocat wrote:
At 3/25/2015 4:55:02 PM, ConservativePolitico wrote:
At 3/25/2015 3:59:55 PM, Philocat wrote:
I'm not sure if exceptionalism is the best word for this phenomenon, but it's the closest word I can think of.

But anyway, what I've noticed on here is that a lot of people, in debates, forums or polls, act as if America is the only country in the world. Examples of this being:

1. People assuming, in debates regarding legalisation, that the debate is concerning American legislation even if that is not specified.

2. People citing statistics just about the USA and seeing them as an acceptable source even when the debate does not particularly pertain to the USA.

3. People using 'X is legal' to mean the same thing as 'X is legal in the USA'.

4. People referring to 'our country' or 'our constitution'. In other words, people assuming that the person they are conversing with is also an American.

5. People using constitutional arguments. For example, often I see debates on gay marriage where people state that 'the constitution demands that gay people be allowed to get married', yet they often use such arguments even if it is not specified whether the debate is about gay marriage in America, or even that their opponent is American and actually gives a damn what the constitution says.

6. People using American political jargon such as 'common core' and 'federal reserve'. I personally understand these terms, but it is a push to expect non-Americans to know these terms as if they are general knowledge. If I spoke to an American on here and used British political jargon such as 'the exchequer' or 'antidisestablishmentarianism' they would most likely get confused and throw a tantrum.

I know that there are a lot of Americans on DDO, but this is no excuse for presuming that America is the 'default' country or that everyone should exclusively care about the state of American society or government.


What brought this up is a debate I saw recently where someone used arguments that only apply to American society and then appeared to go on to reprimand their opponent for not specifying that they supposed to be discussing the issue worldwide and not just America.
This just goes to show how people will assume you are talking about America even if this is never even mentioned.

The vast majority of us are American. Since we're talking to primarily other Americans we default to speaking colloquially about our country. If I had to tack on "in the US" or "I'm talking about America" to everything I said it'd be a hassle when most people know already. If they don't know, they ask, then we inform the person we're speaking about America. Simple.

I see why you think that, although it is still somewhat presumptuous to assume an American framework simply because most people on DDO are American.

No its not. It's simply practical.

Well I'd say it's both ;)

Why is it presumptuous to talk from the default position of American to other Americans?

It's presumptuous to assume that you are talking to an American, especially considering DDO is an international website.
WillYouMarryMe
Posts: 247
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3/25/2015 5:25:28 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/25/2015 3:59:55 PM, Philocat wrote:
I'm not sure if exceptionalism is the best word for this phenomenon, but it's the closest word I can think of.

But anyway, what I've noticed on here is that a lot of people, in debates, forums or polls, act as if America is the only country in the world. Examples of this being:

1. People assuming, in debates regarding legalisation, that the debate is concerning American legislation even if that is not specified.

2. People citing statistics just about the USA and seeing them as an acceptable source even when the debate does not particularly pertain to the USA.

I think that's mostly because stats on US stuff are way easier to obtain than for other countries.


3. People using 'X is legal' to mean the same thing as 'X is legal in the USA'.

4. People referring to 'our country' or 'our constitution'. In other words, people assuming that the person they are conversing with is also an American.

5. People using constitutional arguments. For example, often I see debates on gay marriage where people state that 'the constitution demands that gay people be allowed to get married', yet they often use such arguments even if it is not specified whether the debate is about gay marriage in America, or even that their opponent is American and actually gives a damn what the constitution says.

6. People using American political jargon such as 'common core' and 'federal reserve'. I personally understand these terms, but it is a push to expect non-Americans to know these terms as if they are general knowledge. If I spoke to an American on here and used British political jargon such as 'the exchequer' or 'antidisestablishmentarianism' they would most likely get confused and throw a tantrum.

I know that there are a lot of Americans on DDO, but this is no excuse for presuming that America is the 'default' country or that everyone should exclusively care about the state of American society or government.


What brought this up is a debate I saw recently where someone used arguments that only apply to American society and then appeared to go on to reprimand their opponent for not specifying that they supposed to be discussing the issue worldwide and not just America.
This just goes to show how people will assume you are talking about America even if this is never even mentioned.
16kadams
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3/25/2015 5:31:51 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Using US stats can apply to the UK, lol. UK stats are used in a healthcare debate, for example. WYMM used a study from Canada in his debate with thett. So that point is just silly.

As to the rest, so what? Most people here are American. It makes sense that we would assume a debate is about America. We aren't saying that America is better (*cough* it is *cough*). It's just that we're the majority so we make assumptions
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PetersSmith
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3/25/2015 5:38:58 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/25/2015 3:59:55 PM, Philocat wrote:
I'm not sure if exceptionalism is the best word for this phenomenon, but it's the closest word I can think of.
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TBR
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3/25/2015 5:58:13 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/25/2015 3:59:55 PM, Philocat wrote:
I'm not sure if exceptionalism is the best word for this phenomenon, but it's the closest word I can think of.

But anyway, what I've noticed on here is that a lot of people, in debates, forums or polls, act as if America is the only country in the world. Examples of this being:

1. People assuming, in debates regarding legalisation, that the debate is concerning American legislation even if that is not specified.

2. People citing statistics just about the USA and seeing them as an acceptable source even when the debate does not particularly pertain to the USA.

3. People using 'X is legal' to mean the same thing as 'X is legal in the USA'.

4. People referring to 'our country' or 'our constitution'. In other words, people assuming that the person they are conversing with is also an American.

5. People using constitutional arguments. For example, often I see debates on gay marriage where people state that 'the constitution demands that gay people be allowed to get married', yet they often use such arguments even if it is not specified whether the debate is about gay marriage in America, or even that their opponent is American and actually gives a damn what the constitution says.

6. People using American political jargon such as 'common core' and 'federal reserve'. I personally understand these terms, but it is a push to expect non-Americans to know these terms as if they are general knowledge. If I spoke to an American on here and used British political jargon such as 'the exchequer' or 'antidisestablishmentarianism' they would most likely get confused and throw a tantrum.

I know that there are a lot of Americans on DDO, but this is no excuse for presuming that America is the 'default' country or that everyone should exclusively care about the state of American society or government.


What brought this up is a debate I saw recently where someone used arguments that only apply to American society and then appeared to go on to reprimand their opponent for not specifying that they supposed to be discussing the issue worldwide and not just America.
This just goes to show how people will assume you are talking about America even if this is never even mentioned.

Yes. I am guilt of it too.
Mirza
Posts: 16,992
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3/25/2015 5:58:38 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
I have commented on this before, but differently to how you have done so. There is an issue with the site design, not merely the demographics. For newer members who happen to be from say, Europe, it becomes a dull experience from the very beginning when one has to fill out issues, choose political parties or presidents, of which every option is almost exclusively American. This is completely idiotic on a site that aims for an international pool of members, and not merely from that one country. It is understandable that Americans argue from their own country's perspective when there is obvious bias toward their society and issues in the very design, and the main demographics here as well.

Of course, this doesn't excuse the ignorant little kids who keep addressing one with a tone that is clearly aimed at Americans, in spite of the fact that one's profile says the country of residence is another one.
UtherPenguin
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3/25/2015 6:12:43 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/25/2015 3:59:55 PM, Philocat wrote:
I'm not sure if exceptionalism is the best word for this phenomenon, but it's the closest word I can think of.

But anyway, what I've noticed on here is that a lot of people, in debates, forums or polls, act as if America is the only country in the world. Examples of this being:

1. People assuming, in debates regarding legalisation, that the debate is concerning American legislation even if that is not specified.

2. People citing statistics just about the USA and seeing them as an acceptable source even when the debate does not particularly pertain to the USA.

3. People using 'X is legal' to mean the same thing as 'X is legal in the USA'.

4. People referring to 'our country' or 'our constitution'. In other words, people assuming that the person they are conversing with is also an American.

5. People using constitutional arguments. For example, often I see debates on gay marriage where people state that 'the constitution demands that gay people be allowed to get married', yet they often use such arguments even if it is not specified whether the debate is about gay marriage in America, or even that their opponent is American and actually gives a damn what the constitution says.

6. People using American political jargon such as 'common core' and 'federal reserve'. I personally understand these terms, but it is a push to expect non-Americans to know these terms as if they are general knowledge. If I spoke to an American on here and used British political jargon such as 'the exchequer' or 'antidisestablishmentarianism' they would most likely get confused and throw a tantrum.

I know that there are a lot of Americans on DDO, but this is no excuse for presuming that America is the 'default' country or that everyone should exclusively care about the state of American society or government.


What brought this up is a debate I saw recently where someone used arguments that only apply to American society and then appeared to go on to reprimand their opponent for not specifying that they supposed to be discussing the issue worldwide and not just America.
This just goes to show how people will assume you are talking about America even if this is never even mentioned.

I remember doing a thread asking a similar question in the Politics section ( http://www.debate.org... )
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Chuz-Life
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3/25/2015 8:24:01 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/25/2015 3:59:55 PM, Philocat wrote:
I'm not sure if exceptionalism is the best word for this phenomenon, but it's the closest word I can think of.

But anyway, what I've noticed on here is that a lot of people, in debates, forums or polls, act as if America is the only country in the world. Examples of this being:

1. People assuming, in debates regarding legalisation, that the debate is concerning American legislation even if that is not specified.

2. People citing statistics just about the USA and seeing them as an acceptable source even when the debate does not particularly pertain to the USA.

3. People using 'X is legal' to mean the same thing as 'X is legal in the USA'.

4. People referring to 'our country' or 'our constitution'. In other words, people assuming that the person they are conversing with is also an American.

5. People using constitutional arguments. For example, often I see debates on gay marriage where people state that 'the constitution demands that gay people be allowed to get married', yet they often use such arguments even if it is not specified whether the debate is about gay marriage in America, or even that their opponent is American and actually gives a damn what the constitution says.

6. People using American political jargon such as 'common core' and 'federal reserve'. I personally understand these terms, but it is a push to expect non-Americans to know these terms as if they are general knowledge. If I spoke to an American on here and used British political jargon such as 'the exchequer' or 'antidisestablishmentarianism' they would most likely get confused and throw a tantrum.

I know that there are a lot of Americans on DDO, but this is no excuse for presuming that America is the 'default' country or that everyone should exclusively care about the state of American society or government.


What brought this up is a debate I saw recently where someone used arguments that only apply to American society and then appeared to go on to reprimand their opponent for not specifying that they supposed to be discussing the issue worldwide and not just America.
This just goes to show how people will assume you are talking about America even if this is never even mentioned.

You raise many fair points and I am guilty of most of them In my defense though, I would post the same way regardless of what country I might be in. If I were in Canada, I would orient my comments around Canadian laws and sources. . . If I were in the U.K. I would be primarily focused on the laws there (and I would probably ignore the fact that this is an international website no matter what country I was from)
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sadolite
Posts: 8,838
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3/25/2015 8:43:26 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 3/25/2015 5:16:32 PM, Philocat wrote:
At 3/25/2015 4:55:02 PM, ConservativePolitico wrote:
At 3/25/2015 3:59:55 PM, Philocat wrote:
I'm not sure if exceptionalism is the best word for this phenomenon, but it's the closest word I can think of.

But anyway, what I've noticed on here is that a lot of people, in debates, forums or polls, act as if America is the only country in the world. Examples of this being:

1. People assuming, in debates regarding legalisation, that the debate is concerning American legislation even if that is not specified.

2. People citing statistics just about the USA and seeing them as an acceptable source even when the debate does not particularly pertain to the USA.

3. People using 'X is legal' to mean the same thing as 'X is legal in the USA'.

4. People referring to 'our country' or 'our constitution'. In other words, people assuming that the person they are conversing with is also an American.

5. People using constitutional arguments. For example, often I see debates on gay marriage where people state that 'the constitution demands that gay people be allowed to get married', yet they often use such arguments even if it is not specified whether the debate is about gay marriage in America, or even that their opponent is American and actually gives a damn what the constitution says.

6. People using American political jargon such as 'common core' and 'federal reserve'. I personally understand these terms, but it is a push to expect non-Americans to know these terms as if they are general knowledge. If I spoke to an American on here and used British political jargon such as 'the exchequer' or 'antidisestablishmentarianism' they would most likely get confused and throw a tantrum.

I know that there are a lot of Americans on DDO, but this is no excuse for presuming that America is the 'default' country or that everyone should exclusively care about the state of American society or government.


What brought this up is a debate I saw recently where someone used arguments that only apply to American society and then appeared to go on to reprimand their opponent for not specifying that they supposed to be discussing the issue worldwide and not just America.
This just goes to show how people will assume you are talking about America even if this is never even mentioned.

The vast majority of us are American. Since we're talking to primarily other Americans we default to speaking colloquially about our country. If I had to tack on "in the US" or "I'm talking about America" to everything I said it'd be a hassle when most people know already. If they don't know, they ask, then we inform the person we're speaking about America. Simple.

I see why you think that, although it is still somewhat presumptuous to assume an American framework simply because most people on DDO are American.

That is exactly what it is "Presumptuous" The vast majority of the users are American. Maybe the word "default" would make you feel better.
It's not your views that divide us, it's what you think my views should be that divides us.

If you think I will give up my rights and forsake social etiquette to make you "FEEL" better you are sadly mistaken

If liberal democrats would just stop shooting people gun violence would drop by 90%