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Marketing

Safou
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4/4/2015 11:50:21 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
I want to know if you think that Marketing is really important to the society? What is Marketing for you? What are its main objectives?
Thank you !
Mikal
Posts: 11,270
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4/4/2015 11:56:35 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/4/2015 11:50:21 AM, Safou wrote:
I want to know if you think that Marketing is really important to the society? What is Marketing for you? What are its main objectives?
Thank you !

Sadly since Marketing is now my primary job, I def can confirm its a necessity
ResponsiblyIrresponsible
Posts: 12,398
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4/4/2015 12:20:48 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
It's definitely useful and pivotal to a capitalist economy, though as an upright, condescending economist, I'm obligated to trash-talk it, as my buddies and I often do.

In reality, marketers operate with respect to the following question: "How can we trick people to buy this piece of crap?" There are a number of, obviously, psychological games they tend to play to influence behavior in some way, though this obviously doesn't discount the amount of research necessary to do so.

So, sure, it's important to society -- but I haven't any respect for the discipline.
~ResponsiblyIrresponsible

DDO's Economics Messiah
Mikal
Posts: 11,270
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4/4/2015 12:27:55 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/4/2015 12:20:48 PM, ResponsiblyIrresponsible wrote:
It's definitely useful and pivotal to a capitalist economy, though as an upright, condescending economist, I'm obligated to trash-talk it, as my buddies and I often do.

In reality, marketers operate with respect to the following question: "How can we trick people to buy this piece of crap?" There are a number of, obviously, psychological games they tend to play to influence behavior in some way, though this obviously doesn't discount the amount of research necessary to do so.

So, sure, it's important to society -- but I haven't any respect for the discipline.

That is not always true. It's not always some shady thing, where you are trying to trick people into buying a bad product. You are trying to push your product over others in a competitive way. If you did it false, that is against the law as well. You can't claim certain products operate in certain ways, and then it not do anything you said.

The practice itself is actually fun
ResponsiblyIrresponsible
Posts: 12,398
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4/4/2015 12:40:30 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/4/2015 12:27:55 PM, Mikal wrote:
At 4/4/2015 12:20:48 PM, ResponsiblyIrresponsible wrote:
It's definitely useful and pivotal to a capitalist economy, though as an upright, condescending economist, I'm obligated to trash-talk it, as my buddies and I often do.

In reality, marketers operate with respect to the following question: "How can we trick people to buy this piece of crap?" There are a number of, obviously, psychological games they tend to play to influence behavior in some way, though this obviously doesn't discount the amount of research necessary to do so.

So, sure, it's important to society -- but I haven't any respect for the discipline.

That is not always true. It's not always some shady thing, where you are trying to trick people into buying a bad product. You are trying to push your product over others in a competitive way. If you did it false, that is against the law as well. You can't claim certain products operate in certain ways, and then it not do anything you said.

The practice itself is actually fun

I think there's a difference between what you're arguing marketing isn't necessarily about -- shady, illegal activity -- and what I'm referring to. Undoubtedly, most market campaigns are perfect legitimate and legally permissible, but there are still broader moral questions that, to me, boil down to deception.

For instance, it's totally possible -- and I could probably think of a few examples off the top of my head -- to say almost nothing at all, but make people *think* you said more: i.e., to instill the idea in people's heads that your product offers more than it actually does. Legally, you're totally fine -- what you did is perfectly legitimate, but nevertheless it plays off people's ignorance and stupidity. Even political ad campaigns play the same role.
~ResponsiblyIrresponsible

DDO's Economics Messiah
ResponsiblyIrresponsible
Posts: 12,398
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4/4/2015 12:43:55 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
To be fair, though, the two marketing classes I've taken thus far were more so art classes than they were probing research and market analysis. That, and the fact that my condescending, self-aggrandizing professor wasn't an academic and refused to cede to people who so clearly knew more than him -- i.e., he thought statistics from the US Department of Energy were "biased" -- made my experience rather terrible. My thoughts on marketing are, to some degree, conditioned by my experience, though nevertheless I think the crux of the discipline is in fact to deceive people and perpetuate consumerism.
~ResponsiblyIrresponsible

DDO's Economics Messiah