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"Resolved"

UndeniableReality
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4/28/2015 11:03:01 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
Why is it so common to start debate propositions with "Resolved"? Here are a few reasons I don't understand this practice:

1) If it was resolved, why debate it?

2) Many of the debate topics, such as "Does god exist", have never been objectively resolved in the past. Is it not arrogant to think that one is going to resolve the question in a debate on DDO?

3) As far as I can tell, adding "Resolved" to the proposition or question has no impact on the rules of the debate or how it will play out, making it practically identical to the debate topic without the word "Resolved" preceding it.

Am I missing something obvious?
The-Voice-of-Truth
Posts: 6,542
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4/28/2015 11:05:44 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2015 11:03:01 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
Why is it so common to start debate propositions with "Resolved"? Here are a few reasons I don't understand this practice:

It means that the debate is going to resolve the issue.

1) If it was resolved, why debate it?

Again, "resolved" is meant to indicate that the debate will resolve the issue being debated.

2) Many of the debate topics, such as "Does god exist", have never been objectively resolved in the past. Is it not arrogant to think that one is going to resolve the question in a debate on DDO?

It is common practice, even in real-life debates, for the resolution to begin with "resolved." It is not really arrogant.

3) As far as I can tell, adding "Resolved" to the proposition or question has no impact on the rules of the debate or how it will play out, making it practically identical to the debate topic without the word "Resolved" preceding it.

Like I said, common practice in all debate settings.

Am I missing something obvious?

Well yeah.
Suh dude

"Because we all know who the most important snowflake in the wasteland is... It's YOU, champ! You're a special snowflake." -Vaarka, 01:30 in the hangouts

"Screw laying siege to Korea. That usually takes an hour or so." -Vaarka

"Crap, what is my religion again?" -Vaarka

I'm Rick Harrison and this is my pawn shop. I work here with my old man and my son, Big Hoss, and in 23 years I've learned one thing. You never know what is gonna come through that door.
footballchris561
Posts: 23
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4/28/2015 11:16:56 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2015 11:03:01 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
Why is it so common to start debate propositions with "Resolved"? Here are a few reasons I don't understand this practice:

1) If it was resolved, why debate it?

2) Many of the debate topics, such as "Does god exist", have never been objectively resolved in the past. Is it not arrogant to think that one is going to resolve the question in a debate on DDO?

3) As far as I can tell, adding "Resolved" to the proposition or question has no impact on the rules of the debate or how it will play out, making it practically identical to the debate topic without the word "Resolved" preceding it.

Am I missing something obvious?

I agree. Regardless of the intention, the fact of having 'Resolved' in the title of the debate changes nothing. I don't know if it is arrogant but it is definitely unnecessary where we are debating for recreation.
UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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4/28/2015 11:19:18 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2015 11:05:44 AM, The-Voice-of-Truth wrote:
At 4/28/2015 11:03:01 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
Why is it so common to start debate propositions with "Resolved"? Here are a few reasons I don't understand this practice:

It means that the debate is going to resolve the issue.

1) If it was resolved, why debate it?

Again, "resolved" is meant to indicate that the debate will resolve the issue being debated.

2) Many of the debate topics, such as "Does god exist", have never been objectively resolved in the past. Is it not arrogant to think that one is going to resolve the question in a debate on DDO?

It is common practice, even in real-life debates, for the resolution to begin with "resolved." It is not really arrogant.

3) As far as I can tell, adding "Resolved" to the proposition or question has no impact on the rules of the debate or how it will play out, making it practically identical to the debate topic without the word "Resolved" preceding it.

Like I said, common practice in all debate settings.

Am I missing something obvious?

Well yeah.

That's a little funny. How often do debates truly resolve issues, and how does one know a priori that a given debate will in fact resolve an issue?
whiteflame
Posts: 1,378
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4/28/2015 11:46:27 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2015 11:03:01 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
Why is it so common to start debate propositions with "Resolved"? Here are a few reasons I don't understand this practice:

1) If it was resolved, why debate it?

2) Many of the debate topics, such as "Does god exist", have never been objectively resolved in the past. Is it not arrogant to think that one is going to resolve the question in a debate on DDO?

3) As far as I can tell, adding "Resolved" to the proposition or question has no impact on the rules of the debate or how it will play out, making it practically identical to the debate topic without the word "Resolved" preceding it.

Am I missing something obvious?

Resolved isn't just used in debate, but what it is used for is to make clear what the affirmative team is supporting, what the negative team is negating, and what those in the audience are to choose either to adopt or reject. Resolved simply establishes that, for the group gathered here, in the context of this debate and without outside influences, we either accept or reject the following statement. It's the same basis by which a city council might pass a motion - we're not establishing any major answer to some extremely important question, but rather how people see it based on the arguments given in this session and, in the case of the council, what actions should be taken as a result.
UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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4/28/2015 11:57:07 AM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2015 11:46:27 AM, whiteflame wrote:
At 4/28/2015 11:03:01 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
Why is it so common to start debate propositions with "Resolved"? Here are a few reasons I don't understand this practice:

1) If it was resolved, why debate it?

2) Many of the debate topics, such as "Does god exist", have never been objectively resolved in the past. Is it not arrogant to think that one is going to resolve the question in a debate on DDO?

3) As far as I can tell, adding "Resolved" to the proposition or question has no impact on the rules of the debate or how it will play out, making it practically identical to the debate topic without the word "Resolved" preceding it.

Am I missing something obvious?

Resolved isn't just used in debate, but what it is used for is to make clear what the affirmative team is supporting, what the negative team is negating, and what those in the audience are to choose either to adopt or reject. Resolved simply establishes that, for the group gathered here, in the context of this debate and without outside influences, we either accept or reject the following statement. It's the same basis by which a city council might pass a motion - we're not establishing any major answer to some extremely important question, but rather how people see it based on the arguments given in this session and, in the case of the council, what actions should be taken as a result.

I'm not seeing how adding "Resolved" to a question or proposition makes it clear what the affirmative team is supporting and what the negative team is negating?

If you mean that it means that whatever the outcome of the debate, we will now act upon it, then I can see that. It doesn't quite fit with how it is used on this site though, at least.
The-Voice-of-Truth
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4/28/2015 12:05:27 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2015 11:19:18 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 4/28/2015 11:05:44 AM, The-Voice-of-Truth wrote:
At 4/28/2015 11:03:01 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
Why is it so common to start debate propositions with "Resolved"? Here are a few reasons I don't understand this practice:

It means that the debate is going to resolve the issue.

1) If it was resolved, why debate it?

Again, "resolved" is meant to indicate that the debate will resolve the issue being debated.

2) Many of the debate topics, such as "Does god exist", have never been objectively resolved in the past. Is it not arrogant to think that one is going to resolve the question in a debate on DDO?

It is common practice, even in real-life debates, for the resolution to begin with "resolved." It is not really arrogant.

3) As far as I can tell, adding "Resolved" to the proposition or question has no impact on the rules of the debate or how it will play out, making it practically identical to the debate topic without the word "Resolved" preceding it.

Like I said, common practice in all debate settings.

Am I missing something obvious?

Well yeah.

That's a little funny. How often do debates truly resolve issues, and how does one know a priori that a given debate will in fact resolve an issue?

It is common practice. It doesn't ever truly resolve an issue. People just do it to do it.
Suh dude

"Because we all know who the most important snowflake in the wasteland is... It's YOU, champ! You're a special snowflake." -Vaarka, 01:30 in the hangouts

"Screw laying siege to Korea. That usually takes an hour or so." -Vaarka

"Crap, what is my religion again?" -Vaarka

I'm Rick Harrison and this is my pawn shop. I work here with my old man and my son, Big Hoss, and in 23 years I've learned one thing. You never know what is gonna come through that door.
bsh1
Posts: 27,503
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4/28/2015 12:08:34 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
It's a common way to being resolutions. It stems from a more formal iteration of "be it resolved that." Basically, it the affirmative is asked to uphold that the motion or topic should be resolved, and so when the affirmative reads the topic, they typically include "resolved" as a preface.
Live Long and Prosper

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"Twilight isn't just about obtuse metaphors between cannibalism and premarital sex, it also teaches us the futility of hope." - Raisor

"[Bsh1] is the Guinan of DDO." - ButterCatX

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UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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4/28/2015 12:11:02 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2015 12:05:27 PM, The-Voice-of-Truth wrote:
At 4/28/2015 11:19:18 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 4/28/2015 11:05:44 AM, The-Voice-of-Truth wrote:
At 4/28/2015 11:03:01 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
Why is it so common to start debate propositions with "Resolved"? Here are a few reasons I don't understand this practice:

It means that the debate is going to resolve the issue.

1) If it was resolved, why debate it?

Again, "resolved" is meant to indicate that the debate will resolve the issue being debated.

2) Many of the debate topics, such as "Does god exist", have never been objectively resolved in the past. Is it not arrogant to think that one is going to resolve the question in a debate on DDO?

It is common practice, even in real-life debates, for the resolution to begin with "resolved." It is not really arrogant.

3) As far as I can tell, adding "Resolved" to the proposition or question has no impact on the rules of the debate or how it will play out, making it practically identical to the debate topic without the word "Resolved" preceding it.

Like I said, common practice in all debate settings.

Am I missing something obvious?

Well yeah.

That's a little funny. How often do debates truly resolve issues, and how does one know a priori that a given debate will in fact resolve an issue?

It is common practice. It doesn't ever truly resolve an issue. People just do it to do it.

I'm sure there's a deeper rationale than that.
The-Voice-of-Truth
Posts: 6,542
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4/28/2015 12:11:45 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2015 12:11:02 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:05:27 PM, The-Voice-of-Truth wrote:
At 4/28/2015 11:19:18 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 4/28/2015 11:05:44 AM, The-Voice-of-Truth wrote:
At 4/28/2015 11:03:01 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
Why is it so common to start debate propositions with "Resolved"? Here are a few reasons I don't understand this practice:

It means that the debate is going to resolve the issue.

1) If it was resolved, why debate it?

Again, "resolved" is meant to indicate that the debate will resolve the issue being debated.

2) Many of the debate topics, such as "Does god exist", have never been objectively resolved in the past. Is it not arrogant to think that one is going to resolve the question in a debate on DDO?

It is common practice, even in real-life debates, for the resolution to begin with "resolved." It is not really arrogant.

3) As far as I can tell, adding "Resolved" to the proposition or question has no impact on the rules of the debate or how it will play out, making it practically identical to the debate topic without the word "Resolved" preceding it.

Like I said, common practice in all debate settings.

Am I missing something obvious?

Well yeah.

That's a little funny. How often do debates truly resolve issues, and how does one know a priori that a given debate will in fact resolve an issue?

It is common practice. It doesn't ever truly resolve an issue. People just do it to do it.

I'm sure there's a deeper rationale than that.

Look at Bsh's post.
Suh dude

"Because we all know who the most important snowflake in the wasteland is... It's YOU, champ! You're a special snowflake." -Vaarka, 01:30 in the hangouts

"Screw laying siege to Korea. That usually takes an hour or so." -Vaarka

"Crap, what is my religion again?" -Vaarka

I'm Rick Harrison and this is my pawn shop. I work here with my old man and my son, Big Hoss, and in 23 years I've learned one thing. You never know what is gonna come through that door.
UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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4/28/2015 12:13:29 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2015 12:08:34 PM, bsh1 wrote:
It's a common way to being resolutions. It stems from a more formal iteration of "be it resolved that." Basically, it the affirmative is asked to uphold that the motion or topic should be resolved, and so when the affirmative reads the topic, they typically include "resolved" as a preface.

That was typed out a bit hastily so I'm not sure I'm understanding it correctly. Are you saying that it means that the debate should attempt to resolve the issue? It sounds like that implies a burden of proof as well?
whiteflame
Posts: 1,378
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4/28/2015 12:13:49 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2015 11:57:07 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 4/28/2015 11:46:27 AM, whiteflame wrote:
At 4/28/2015 11:03:01 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
Why is it so common to start debate propositions with "Resolved"? Here are a few reasons I don't understand this practice:

1) If it was resolved, why debate it?

2) Many of the debate topics, such as "Does god exist", have never been objectively resolved in the past. Is it not arrogant to think that one is going to resolve the question in a debate on DDO?

3) As far as I can tell, adding "Resolved" to the proposition or question has no impact on the rules of the debate or how it will play out, making it practically identical to the debate topic without the word "Resolved" preceding it.

Am I missing something obvious?

Resolved isn't just used in debate, but what it is used for is to make clear what the affirmative team is supporting, what the negative team is negating, and what those in the audience are to choose either to adopt or reject. Resolved simply establishes that, for the group gathered here, in the context of this debate and without outside influences, we either accept or reject the following statement. It's the same basis by which a city council might pass a motion - we're not establishing any major answer to some extremely important question, but rather how people see it based on the arguments given in this session and, in the case of the council, what actions should be taken as a result.

I'm not seeing how adding "Resolved" to a question or proposition makes it clear what the affirmative team is supporting and what the negative team is negating?

It makes it clear what the context is for how the debate should be evaluated. If we just ask a question or make a declarative statement, people can agree or disagree with it, and we move on. The question is not whether an external viewer agrees or disagrees, but rather whether that person, following the arguments given, would affirm or negate the resolution.

If you mean that it means that whatever the outcome of the debate, we will now act upon it, then I can see that. It doesn't quite fit with how it is used on this site though, at least.

Since most "resolved" resolutions should be applied to policy debates, it is mainly how it's used. In other cases, if we resolve to accept a position instead, then that's fine too. It may not result in action being taken, which doesn't necessarily resolve a given issue, but the debate itself is resolved. Just like a policy decision can be reversed, though, so can the views following the resolution of a given issue.
UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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4/28/2015 12:16:42 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2015 12:13:49 PM, whiteflame wrote:
At 4/28/2015 11:57:07 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 4/28/2015 11:46:27 AM, whiteflame wrote:
At 4/28/2015 11:03:01 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
Why is it so common to start debate propositions with "Resolved"? Here are a few reasons I don't understand this practice:

1) If it was resolved, why debate it?

2) Many of the debate topics, such as "Does god exist", have never been objectively resolved in the past. Is it not arrogant to think that one is going to resolve the question in a debate on DDO?

3) As far as I can tell, adding "Resolved" to the proposition or question has no impact on the rules of the debate or how it will play out, making it practically identical to the debate topic without the word "Resolved" preceding it.

Am I missing something obvious?

Resolved isn't just used in debate, but what it is used for is to make clear what the affirmative team is supporting, what the negative team is negating, and what those in the audience are to choose either to adopt or reject. Resolved simply establishes that, for the group gathered here, in the context of this debate and without outside influences, we either accept or reject the following statement. It's the same basis by which a city council might pass a motion - we're not establishing any major answer to some extremely important question, but rather how people see it based on the arguments given in this session and, in the case of the council, what actions should be taken as a result.

I'm not seeing how adding "Resolved" to a question or proposition makes it clear what the affirmative team is supporting and what the negative team is negating?

It makes it clear what the context is for how the debate should be evaluated. If we just ask a question or make a declarative statement, people can agree or disagree with it, and we move on. The question is not whether an external viewer agrees or disagrees, but rather whether that person, following the arguments given, would affirm or negate the resolution.

If you mean that it means that whatever the outcome of the debate, we will now act upon it, then I can see that. It doesn't quite fit with how it is used on this site though, at least.

Since most "resolved" resolutions should be applied to policy debates, it is mainly how it's used. In other cases, if we resolve to accept a position instead, then that's fine too. It may not result in action being taken, which doesn't necessarily resolve a given issue, but the debate itself is resolved. Just like a policy decision can be reversed, though, so can the views following the resolution of a given issue.

I think I understand now. It seems like a subtle distinction, but not exactly useless. I thought all debates were meant to be evaluated by whether someone would affirm or negate the resolution, rather than whether they would agree or disagree with it.
ben2974
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4/28/2015 12:17:30 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2015 11:19:18 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 4/28/2015 11:05:44 AM, The-Voice-of-Truth wrote:
At 4/28/2015 11:03:01 AM, UndeniableReality wrote:
Why is it so common to start debate propositions with "Resolved"? Here are a few reasons I don't understand this practice:

It means that the debate is going to resolve the issue.

1) If it was resolved, why debate it?

Again, "resolved" is meant to indicate that the debate will resolve the issue being debated.

2) Many of the debate topics, such as "Does god exist", have never been objectively resolved in the past. Is it not arrogant to think that one is going to resolve the question in a debate on DDO?

It is common practice, even in real-life debates, for the resolution to begin with "resolved." It is not really arrogant.

3) As far as I can tell, adding "Resolved" to the proposition or question has no impact on the rules of the debate or how it will play out, making it practically identical to the debate topic without the word "Resolved" preceding it.

Like I said, common practice in all debate settings.

Am I missing something obvious?

Well yeah.

That's a little funny. How often do debates truly resolve issues, and how does one know a priori that a given debate will in fact resolve an issue?

I think it just means within the context of the parties involved with the issue. Between the parties, it will be resolved.
bsh1
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4/28/2015 12:18:02 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2015 12:13:29 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:08:34 PM, bsh1 wrote:
It's a common way to being resolutions. It stems from a more formal iteration of "be it resolved that." Basically, it the affirmative is asked to uphold that the motion or topic should be resolved, and so when the affirmative reads the topic, they typically include "resolved" as a preface.

That was typed out a bit hastily so I'm not sure I'm understanding it correctly. Are you saying that it means that the debate should attempt to resolve the issue? It sounds like that implies a burden of proof as well?

No. So, there are two ways of phrasing a topic:

Resolved: Justice requires the Recognition of Animal Rights
Be it resolved that Justice requires the Recognition of Animal Rights

Both iterations are asking the house--that is to say, the audience--to take up the motion. It's not a statement of the burden of proof so much so as it is indicating that the motion needs to be approved or not approved.
Live Long and Prosper

I'm a Bish.


"Twilight isn't just about obtuse metaphors between cannibalism and premarital sex, it also teaches us the futility of hope." - Raisor

"[Bsh1] is the Guinan of DDO." - ButterCatX

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bsh1
Posts: 27,503
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4/28/2015 12:18:21 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
Think of it as a rhetorical device.
Live Long and Prosper

I'm a Bish.


"Twilight isn't just about obtuse metaphors between cannibalism and premarital sex, it also teaches us the futility of hope." - Raisor

"[Bsh1] is the Guinan of DDO." - ButterCatX

Follow the DDOlympics
: http://www.debate.org...

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UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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4/28/2015 12:21:03 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2015 12:18:02 PM, bsh1 wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:13:29 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:08:34 PM, bsh1 wrote:
It's a common way to being resolutions. It stems from a more formal iteration of "be it resolved that." Basically, it the affirmative is asked to uphold that the motion or topic should be resolved, and so when the affirmative reads the topic, they typically include "resolved" as a preface.

That was typed out a bit hastily so I'm not sure I'm understanding it correctly. Are you saying that it means that the debate should attempt to resolve the issue? It sounds like that implies a burden of proof as well?

No. So, there are two ways of phrasing a topic:

Resolved: Justice requires the Recognition of Animal Rights
Be it resolved that Justice requires the Recognition of Animal Rights

Both iterations are asking the house--that is to say, the audience--to take up the motion. It's not a statement of the burden of proof so much so as it is indicating that the motion needs to be approved or not approved.

I understand now (except I'm not familiar with that usage of the term "iteration", but now I'm just being pedantic). Thanks, that helps a lot.

My only remaining question is this: isn't that the default for any debate? Or is it explicitly excluding the "undecided" vote?
mishapqueen
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4/28/2015 12:28:44 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
It's a cross over from debates in political spheres, such as parliament. Also it shows the stance taken. Most people don't debate about topics where they are certain they are wrong. Only a few ( ahem Wylted) argue for things they don't believe in.
You cannot choose whether or not you will live by rules, but you can choose which rules you will live by. --Me

"I was wrong. Squirrels are objectively superior to bunnies in every conceivable dimension."
--Joey

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Nunc aut Numquam
bsh1
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4/28/2015 12:48:11 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2015 12:21:03 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:18:02 PM, bsh1 wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:13:29 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:08:34 PM, bsh1 wrote:
It's a common way to being resolutions. It stems from a more formal iteration of "be it resolved that." Basically, it the affirmative is asked to uphold that the motion or topic should be resolved, and so when the affirmative reads the topic, they typically include "resolved" as a preface.

That was typed out a bit hastily so I'm not sure I'm understanding it correctly. Are you saying that it means that the debate should attempt to resolve the issue? It sounds like that implies a burden of proof as well?

No. So, there are two ways of phrasing a topic:

Resolved: Justice requires the Recognition of Animal Rights
Be it resolved that Justice requires the Recognition of Animal Rights

Both iterations are asking the house--that is to say, the audience--to take up the motion. It's not a statement of the burden of proof so much so as it is indicating that the motion needs to be approved or not approved.

I understand now (except I'm not familiar with that usage of the term "iteration", but now I'm just being pedantic). Thanks, that helps a lot.

http://www.merriam-webster.com...

My only remaining question is this: isn't that the default for any debate? Or is it explicitly excluding the "undecided" vote?

I mean, it is more of a rhetorical device than anything else. It really doesn't have any practical meaning.
Live Long and Prosper

I'm a Bish.


"Twilight isn't just about obtuse metaphors between cannibalism and premarital sex, it also teaches us the futility of hope." - Raisor

"[Bsh1] is the Guinan of DDO." - ButterCatX

Follow the DDOlympics
: http://www.debate.org...

Open Debate Topics Project: http://www.debate.org...
UndeniableReality
Posts: 1,897
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4/28/2015 12:51:34 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2015 12:48:11 PM, bsh1 wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:21:03 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:18:02 PM, bsh1 wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:13:29 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:08:34 PM, bsh1 wrote:
It's a common way to being resolutions. It stems from a more formal iteration of "be it resolved that." Basically, it the affirmative is asked to uphold that the motion or topic should be resolved, and so when the affirmative reads the topic, they typically include "resolved" as a preface.

That was typed out a bit hastily so I'm not sure I'm understanding it correctly. Are you saying that it means that the debate should attempt to resolve the issue? It sounds like that implies a burden of proof as well?

No. So, there are two ways of phrasing a topic:

Resolved: Justice requires the Recognition of Animal Rights
Be it resolved that Justice requires the Recognition of Animal Rights

Both iterations are asking the house--that is to say, the audience--to take up the motion. It's not a statement of the burden of proof so much so as it is indicating that the motion needs to be approved or not approved.

I understand now (except I'm not familiar with that usage of the term "iteration", but now I'm just being pedantic). Thanks, that helps a lot.

http://www.merriam-webster.com...

Yes. Those are the usages I am familiar with.

My only remaining question is this: isn't that the default for any debate? Or is it explicitly excluding the "undecided" vote?

I mean, it is more of a rhetorical device than anything else. It really doesn't have any practical meaning.

Well, the way you stated it before seems to convey some practical meaning. If it were really just a rhetorical device, why use it?
bsh1
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4/28/2015 12:58:55 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2015 12:51:34 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:48:11 PM, bsh1 wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:21:03 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:18:02 PM, bsh1 wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:13:29 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:08:34 PM, bsh1 wrote:
It's a common way to being resolutions. It stems from a more formal iteration of "be it resolved that." Basically, it the affirmative is asked to uphold that the motion or topic should be resolved, and so when the affirmative reads the topic, they typically include "resolved" as a preface.

That was typed out a bit hastily so I'm not sure I'm understanding it correctly. Are you saying that it means that the debate should attempt to resolve the issue? It sounds like that implies a burden of proof as well?

No. So, there are two ways of phrasing a topic:

Resolved: Justice requires the Recognition of Animal Rights
Be it resolved that Justice requires the Recognition of Animal Rights

Both iterations are asking the house--that is to say, the audience--to take up the motion. It's not a statement of the burden of proof so much so as it is indicating that the motion needs to be approved or not approved.

I understand now (except I'm not familiar with that usage of the term "iteration", but now I'm just being pedantic). Thanks, that helps a lot.

http://www.merriam-webster.com...

Yes. Those are the usages I am familiar with.

Right, so in this case "resolved" is an iteration, albeit with slightly different phrasing, of "be it resolved."

My only remaining question is this: isn't that the default for any debate? Or is it explicitly excluding the "undecided" vote?

I mean, it is more of a rhetorical device than anything else. It really doesn't have any practical meaning.

Well, the way you stated it before seems to convey some practical meaning. If it were really just a rhetorical device, why use it?

It used to have meaning, but now it's more of a vestige of an older way of framing debates.
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UndeniableReality
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4/28/2015 1:02:29 PM
Posted: 1 year ago
At 4/28/2015 12:58:55 PM, bsh1 wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:51:34 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:48:11 PM, bsh1 wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:21:03 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:18:02 PM, bsh1 wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:13:29 PM, UndeniableReality wrote:
At 4/28/2015 12:08:34 PM, bsh1 wrote:
It's a common way to being resolutions. It stems from a more formal iteration of "be it resolved that." Basically, it the affirmative is asked to uphold that the motion or topic should be resolved, and so when the affirmative reads the topic, they typically include "resolved" as a preface.

That was typed out a bit hastily so I'm not sure I'm understanding it correctly. Are you saying that it means that the debate should attempt to resolve the issue? It sounds like that implies a burden of proof as well?

No. So, there are two ways of phrasing a topic:

Resolved: Justice requires the Recognition of Animal Rights
Be it resolved that Justice requires the Recognition of Animal Rights

Both iterations are asking the house--that is to say, the audience--to take up the motion. It's not a statement of the burden of proof so much so as it is indicating that the motion needs to be approved or not approved.

I understand now (except I'm not familiar with that usage of the term "iteration", but now I'm just being pedantic). Thanks, that helps a lot.

http://www.merriam-webster.com...

Yes. Those are the usages I am familiar with.

Right, so in this case "resolved" is an iteration, albeit with slightly different phrasing, of "be it resolved."

Got it.

My only remaining question is this: isn't that the default for any debate? Or is it explicitly excluding the "undecided" vote?

I mean, it is more of a rhetorical device than anything else. It really doesn't have any practical meaning.

Well, the way you stated it before seems to convey some practical meaning. If it were really just a rhetorical device, why use it?

It used to have meaning, but now it's more of a vestige of an older way of framing debates.

Fair enough. That's enough for me to think it should be dropped.