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Requesting intensely critical feedback

Xerdex
Posts: 19
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2/6/2016 1:07:00 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
Hi, whoever reads this, I am criticising my argument and I would like some input as well!

-Start criticism-
An assertion that was not explained: "Another consequence of giving out too much homework is that students are brainwashed into following a notoriously inefficient way of studying: studying more."

I don't think my argument was general enough, I did not consider a student that is excelling.
-End criticism-

Overall,
1) Is my argument sound?
2) Can you spot any fallacies?
3) Were you convinced?

Thanks to anyone who helps find the faults in my argument!
famousdebater
Posts: 3,938
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2/6/2016 1:50:44 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/6/2016 1:07:00 PM, Xerdex wrote:
Hi, whoever reads this, I am criticising my argument and I would like some input as well!

-Start criticism-
An assertion that was not explained: "Another consequence of giving out too much homework is that students are brainwashed into following a notoriously inefficient way of studying: studying more."

I don't think my argument was general enough, I did not consider a student that is excelling.
-End criticism-

Overall,
1) Is my argument sound?
2) Can you spot any fallacies?
3) Were you convinced?

Thanks to anyone who helps find the faults in my argument!

So am I criticizing the bold?
"Life calls the tune, we dance."
John Galsworthy
Xerdex
Posts: 19
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2/6/2016 3:28:41 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
Sorry, I may have been unclear. I would love you to criticise my whole argument in the debate. The start & end criticism wrapping was my criticism on my argument. Thanks
whiteflame
Posts: 1,378
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2/6/2016 4:35:33 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
Hope this is what you're looking for.

"Teachers give out too much homework."

This is actually the only point you make that addresses the resolution. The resolution is "Do teachers give us too much gomework?", and since we're going to give the instigator the benefit of the doubt and fix his spelling mistake on homework, that means the resolution is focused on whether or not teachers give too much homework, not whether or not giving too much homework is beneficial, which is the focus of the rest of your argument.

This is also an assertion. Saying that they give too much homework is just stating what your side has to uphold on this particular resolution. It doesn't give any warrants or evidence showing that that's the case. Chances are there are some polls out there that would help you here. You also would have to give some idea of what too much homework looks like. You left that rather nebulous, and I'm not clear where to draw the line between what's too much and what's just right. If I don't know where that dividing line is, then the difference is always perceptual, making it rather difficult to assess whether or not the resolution is true.

"The purposes of homework is to instil discipline, force revision and application of the material learnt in class (i.e. further study out of class.)"

This seems like a partial concession to me. You're giving away reasons why homework is beneficial, reasons your opponent never articulated. One way to win this debate more easily is just to argue that homework in general is too much, and then argue that there are either no benefits or the harms outweigh the benefits. Giving your opponent specific points to argue that homework is beneficial is not a good way to start out.

"Too much homework can see detrimental effects on the student's attitude and understanding for the material. The reason is that homework is disliked due to dullness and lack of engagement, especially when given out excessively because most students do not like doing tedious tasks."

There are some jumps in logic here. You're assuming that, whatever too much homework is, it's going to be dull and it's going to be tedious. What about if a teacher gives out highly diverse homework that pushes students to use a lot of different faculties? You're assuming the content of that homework rather than assessing the "more vs. less" dynamic. Similarly, you're not explaining why dull or tedious work results in a lack of engagement. That might seem obvious, but you giving reasons why tedious work is inherently disengaging would have bolstered this point.

"Thus, when teachers give out too much homework, these students rush and complete it with a "just-enough" attitude in hopes to escape the consequence of not doing it. It is clear that the practicality of homework is nullified because these students aren't revising & applying the content most effectively. Additionally, there will most likely be a lack of appreciation of the content hence the intended skills that the students are meant to learn study the subject will unlikely be gained."

Again, logical leaps. Why does tedious homework result in students rushing through those assignments? Why don't grades suffice as a reason for students to try harder on their homework? Why does tediousness inherently push students towards that "just-enough" attitude? The latter statements have no clear reasoning. Why should I buy that more homework results in less revising and application of content? Why would content go underappreciated due to its volume being larger? Why wouldn't repeated emphasis increase appreciation of the material?

"Another consequence of giving out too much homework is that students are brainwashed into following a notoriously inefficient way of studying: studying more."

Another assertion. Why is studying more "a notoriously inefficient way of studying"? That seems counter-intuitive to me. And how is pushing students towards this linear increase in studying brainwashing? This point just doesn't have the warrants behind it that it needs.

"There needs to be a balance with volume of homework sent, not too less (ineffective) or not too much (tedious)."

I think this sets you up for trouble. Now you're pushing yourself to argue for a "just right" amount of homework, and that means you're expanding your burden, as you have to show that whatever is too little and whatever is too much is not good, and that there's some nebulous middle ground that teachers should hold to. Sounds good in theory, not exactly simple to defend.
famousdebater
Posts: 3,938
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2/6/2016 5:10:41 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/6/2016 3:28:41 PM, Xerdex wrote:
Sorry, I may have been unclear. I would love you to criticise my whole argument in the debate. The start & end criticism wrapping was my criticism on my argument. Thanks

You should probably read whiteflame's critique above this post.
"Life calls the tune, we dance."
John Galsworthy
diarrhea_of_a_wimpy_kid
Posts: 146
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2/6/2016 6:57:47 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/6/2016 4:35:33 PM, whiteflame wrote:
Hope this is what you're looking for.

"Teachers give out too much homework."

This is actually the only point you make that addresses the resolution. The resolution is "Do teachers give us too much gomework?", and since we're going to give the instigator the benefit of the doubt and fix his spelling mistake on homework, that means the resolution is focused on whether or not teachers give too much homework, not whether or not giving too much homework is beneficial, which is the focus of the rest of your argument.

This is also an assertion. Saying that they give too much homework is just stating what your side has to uphold on this particular resolution. It doesn't give any warrants or evidence showing that that's the case. Chances are there are some polls out there that would help you here. You also would have to give some idea of what too much homework looks like. You left that rather nebulous, and I'm not clear where to draw the line between what's too much and what's just right. If I don't know where that dividing line is, then the difference is always perceptual, making it rather difficult to assess whether or not the resolution is true.

"The purposes of homework is to instil discipline, force revision and application of the material learnt in class (i.e. further study out of class.)"

This seems like a partial concession to me. You're giving away reasons why homework is beneficial, reasons your opponent never articulated. One way to win this debate more easily is just to argue that homework in general is too much, and then argue that there are either no benefits or the harms outweigh the benefits. Giving your opponent specific points to argue that homework is beneficial is not a good way to start out.

"Too much homework can see detrimental effects on the student's attitude and understanding for the material. The reason is that homework is disliked due to dullness and lack of engagement, especially when given out excessively because most students do not like doing tedious tasks."

There are some jumps in logic here. You're assuming that, whatever too much homework is, it's going to be dull and it's going to be tedious. What about if a teacher gives out highly diverse homework that pushes students to use a lot of different faculties? You're assuming the content of that homework rather than assessing the "more vs. less" dynamic. Similarly, you're not explaining why dull or tedious work results in a lack of engagement. That might seem obvious, but you giving reasons why tedious work is inherently disengaging would have bolstered this point.

"Thus, when teachers give out too much homework, these students rush and complete it with a "just-enough" attitude in hopes to escape the consequence of not doing it. It is clear that the practicality of homework is nullified because these students aren't revising & applying the content most effectively. Additionally, there will most likely be a lack of appreciation of the content hence the intended skills that the students are meant to learn study the subject will unlikely be gained."

Again, logical leaps. Why does tedious homework result in students rushing through those assignments? Why don't grades suffice as a reason for students to try harder on their homework? Why does tediousness inherently push students towards that "just-enough" attitude? The latter statements have no clear reasoning. Why should I buy that more homework results in less revising and application of content? Why would content go underappreciated due to its volume being larger? Why wouldn't repeated emphasis increase appreciation of the material?

"Another consequence of giving out too much homework is that students are brainwashed into following a notoriously inefficient way of studying: studying more."

Another assertion. Why is studying more "a notoriously inefficient way of studying"? That seems counter-intuitive to me. And how is pushing students towards this linear increase in studying brainwashing? This point just doesn't have the warrants behind it that it needs.

"There needs to be a balance with volume of homework sent, not too less (ineffective) or not too much (tedious)."

I think this sets you up for trouble. Now you're pushing yourself to argue for a "just right" amount of homework, and that means you're expanding your burden, as you have to show that whatever is too little and whatever is too much is not good, and that there's some nebulous middle ground that teachers should hold to. Sounds good in theory, not exactly simple to defend.

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Wylted
Posts: 21,167
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2/6/2016 7:28:07 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
There are actually studies done to show the proper amount of homework for each age group and goes on to explain why. I'd argue that kids on average have too little though. There should be assigned homework atleast 3 days a week for the entirety of summer break also. Given the studies done to show that poor kids fall behind during the summer, or if they don't go to year round school.
Xerdex
Posts: 19
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2/7/2016 12:44:08 PM
Posted: 10 months ago
At 2/6/2016 4:35:33 PM, whiteflame wrote:
Hope this is what you're looking for.

"Teachers give out too much homework."

This is actually the only point you make that addresses the resolution. The resolution is "Do teachers give us too much gomework?", and since we're going to give the instigator the benefit of the doubt and fix his spelling mistake on homework, that means the resolution is focused on whether or not teachers give too much homework, not whether or not giving too much homework is beneficial, which is the focus of the rest of your argument.

This is also an assertion. Saying that they give too much homework is just stating what your side has to uphold on this particular resolution. It doesn't give any warrants or evidence showing that that's the case. Chances are there are some polls out there that would help you here. You also would have to give some idea of what too much homework looks like. You left that rather nebulous, and I'm not clear where to draw the line between what's too much and what's just right. If I don't know where that dividing line is, then the difference is always perceptual, making it rather difficult to assess whether or not the resolution is true.

"The purposes of homework is to instil discipline, force revision and application of the material learnt in class (i.e. further study out of class.)"

This seems like a partial concession to me. You're giving away reasons why homework is beneficial, reasons your opponent never articulated. One way to win this debate more easily is just to argue that homework in general is too much, and then argue that there are either no benefits or the harms outweigh the benefits. Giving your opponent specific points to argue that homework is beneficial is not a good way to start out.

"Too much homework can see detrimental effects on the student's attitude and understanding for the material. The reason is that homework is disliked due to dullness and lack of engagement, especially when given out excessively because most students do not like doing tedious tasks."

There are some jumps in logic here. You're assuming that, whatever too much homework is, it's going to be dull and it's going to be tedious. What about if a teacher gives out highly diverse homework that pushes students to use a lot of different faculties? You're assuming the content of that homework rather than assessing the "more vs. less" dynamic. Similarly, you're not explaining why dull or tedious work results in a lack of engagement. That might seem obvious, but you giving reasons why tedious work is inherently disengaging would have bolstered this point.

"Thus, when teachers give out too much homework, these students rush and complete it with a "just-enough" attitude in hopes to escape the consequence of not doing it. It is clear that the practicality of homework is nullified because these students aren't revising & applying the content most effectively. Additionally, there will most likely be a lack of appreciation of the content hence the intended skills that the students are meant to learn study the subject will unlikely be gained."

Again, logical leaps. Why does tedious homework result in students rushing through those assignments? Why don't grades suffice as a reason for students to try harder on their homework? Why does tediousness inherently push students towards that "just-enough" attitude? The latter statements have no clear reasoning. Why should I buy that more homework results in less revising and application of content? Why would content go underappreciated due to its volume being larger? Why wouldn't repeated emphasis increase appreciation of the material?

"Another consequence of giving out too much homework is that students are brainwashed into following a notoriously inefficient way of studying: studying more."

Another assertion. Why is studying more "a notoriously inefficient way of studying"? That seems counter-intuitive to me. And how is pushing students towards this linear increase in studying brainwashing? This point just doesn't have the warrants behind it that it needs.

"There needs to be a balance with volume of homework sent, not too less (ineffective) or not too much (tedious)."

I think this sets you up for trouble. Now you're pushing yourself to argue for a "just right" amount of homework, and that means you're expanding your burden, as you have to show that whatever is too little and whatever is too much is not good, and that there's some nebulous middle ground that teachers should hold to. Sounds good in theory, not exactly simple to defend.

Wow, outstanding analysis! Thank you so much for helping me detect issues with my thinking, I'm really grateful.

I will take this beautiful critique on board, think about it for a while, then try to not make the same mistakes in the future, as well as applying them to daily life :D