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Is the Public Sector a Lucrative Career?

wrichcirw
Posts: 11,196
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12/17/2012 12:47:02 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
The first two paragraphs in the hyperlinked article:

California Highway Patrol division chief Jeff Talbott retired last year as the best-paid officer in the 12 most-populous U.S. states, collecting $483,581 in salary, pension and other compensation.

Talbott, 53, received $280,259 for accrued leave and vacation time and took a new job running the public-safety department at a private university in Southern California. He also began collecting an annual pension of $174,888 from the state.

http://www.bloomberg.com...

Unionization, overtime, and (just maybe) abuse of power...this is YOUR tax dollars at work. Is this appropriate?
At 8/9/2013 9:41:24 AM, wrichcirw wrote:
If you are civil with me, I will be civil to you. If you decide to bring unreasonable animosity to bear in a reasonable discussion, then what would you expect other than to get flustered?
malcolmxy
Posts: 2,855
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12/23/2012 2:12:25 AM
Posted: 3 years ago
At 12/17/2012 12:47:02 PM, wrichcirw wrote:
The first two paragraphs in the hyperlinked article:

California Highway Patrol division chief Jeff Talbott retired last year as the best-paid officer in the 12 most-populous U.S. states, collecting $483,581 in salary, pension and other compensation.

Talbott, 53, received $280,259 for accrued leave and vacation time and took a new job running the public-safety department at a private university in Southern California. He also began collecting an annual pension of $174,888 from the state.

http://www.bloomberg.com...

Unionization, overtime, and (just maybe) abuse of power...this is YOUR tax dollars at work. Is this appropriate?

It's like any other system. Some people figure out how to game the system. Given that he had a job, at least for a time, where one of the downsides of going to work was that he had a highly increased chance of violent death, this example, as extreme as it is (and equally rare as well) really doesn't offend me.

College football coaches being the highest paid state employees in each state with a public college that has a major football program, which also doesn't really offend me, registers higher on my radar than that guy does.
War is over, if you want it.

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DudeWithoutTheE
Posts: 53
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12/26/2012 1:10:31 PM
Posted: 3 years ago
The Government is quite a large sector of the economy. In a state as large as California, there are going to be thousands and thousands of employees, and one of them by definition has to be the best paid (and this guy is the single best paid in the 12 biggest states, which says to me that State governments on the whole are relatively prudent). Do I think it is conceivable that the head of a large organization like Cali Highway Patrol deserves $400 grand? Yeah, sure, why not. Most private companies would likely pay a guy with equivalent experience and responsibility in their particular area quite a lot more. It's probably a comparably responsible job with, say, an MLB general manager, and those guys get paid somewhere in the region of $500k-$2m, but have a lot less job security.

The bigger issue for me with the public sector is less the guys at the top, and more the guys with relatively limited skillsets who happen to work in areas where downing tools can create acute harm to the rest of the economy/society using that fact to extort the government. A great example being NY garbage men or London metro drivers.